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for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 



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MOTION PICTURE 

HERALD 




REVIEWS 

(In Product Digest) 

An American Romance 
Mystery Man 
The Last Horseman 



OP 




Welcome, Mr. Washington J ^,(__ 



Follow the Leader 
Candles at Nine 
Law Men 
Minstrel Man 



TELEVISION: 

8 Will supplement radio and screen with- 
out conflict" — M. H. Aylesworth 

'Will have no effect until satisfactory 
profit becomes available" — Paul Raibourn 

13 CURRENT HIT SONGS FROM 
SCREEN; ONE FROM BROADWAY 

FREE MOVIE DAY" SUPPLIES 
FINAL BOND DRIVE PUSH 



JULY I, 1944 



VOL 156, NO. I 



Entered as second-class matter, January 12, 1931, at the Post Oit : ee at New York City, U.S.A., under the act of March 1879. Pub- 
lished tceckly bv Quialc\ Publishing Co., Inc., at 1270 Sixth Avenue, Hockefeller Center. New York 20, AT. Y. Subscription prices: $5.00 
a year in the Americas, $10.00 a year Foreign. Single copy, 25 cents. All contents copyright 1944 by Quiglcy Publishing Company. 



"What a Summer Show 
Better than a cooling plant!" 



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MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



COLY1N BROWN, Publisher 


MARTIN QUIGLEY 
President and Editor-in-Chief 


TERRY RAMSAYE, Editor 


Vol. 156, No. 1 


OP 


July 1, 1944 



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FREE MOVIE DAY" 



THE "Fighting Fifth" War Loan campaign reaches its 
patriotic peak appropriately in the week of the Fourth 
of July with its dynamically promoted "Free Movie Day", 
July 6, with admissions for premiums on bond sales. 

Interesting adventure in a saturation barrage of radio pro- 
motion in cooperation with the theatres, starting the night of 
July 5, promises a new test of the medium. 

The hope and prospect is for the biggest war loan day in 
the experience of this, the biggest of wars. 

This war is consuming money at the same mad rate that 
powder burns in a rocket. 

While we spend Over There we must buy over here. 
The guns of victory are hungry. 



THE BENJAMIN WARNER 

WITH pride and reverence the sons of the House of 
Warner view the honor to their father, and the 
founder, in the launching of the S.S. Bwijamin War- 
ner, christened in his name, to take the water Saturday at 
the Kaiser yards at Richmond, California. 

The occasion is an event of the industry of the motion pic- 
ture, too. It was in the natal year of "the story picture", 1905, 
that the late Mr. Sam Warner discovered the screen and 
opportunity. A traveling projection equipment and one print 
of "The Great Train Robbery" were for sale, for $150. The 
father took fifty dollars out of his till, and pawned his gold 
watch and chain for a hundred. Thereupon the Four Warner 
Brothers, Sam and Harry and Albert and Jack, were in the 
movies. Now there is a third generation, represented by 
Captain Jack L. Warner, Jr., who is probably somewhere in 
Normandy, fighting for the land of liberty to which his grand- 
father came from Poland so long ago. 

The ties of family and the qualities of filial devotion so 
characteristic of the Warners are reflected in the arrangement 
by which Mrs. Annie Robbins, eldest daughter of Benjamin, 
is to be the matron of honor at the launching, where Miss Lita 
B. Warner, daughter of Sam Warner, will sponsor the brave 
ship, which is, incidentally, the last of the Liberties. The 
invocation is to be by the Reverend Dr. Rudolph I. Coffee, 
who many a year ago officiated at the weddings of Mr. Harry 
M. and Major Albert Warner. It is a proud day for Benjamin 
and all the members of the House of Warner. They have 
written a chapter in the American saga. 

Appropriately, on this patriotic occasion, a large scale model 
of the Statue of Liberty is to be unveiled at the shipyards in 
sequel to the launching of the ship. 



AN expression of the responsibly patriotic Americanism 
of this motion picture family came last week in a 
message from Mr. Harry Warner to an exhibitor 
gathering in which he discussed the obligation of the 
screen, saying: 

"Whether a producer makes a picture for pleasure or for 
profit, for pure entertainment or for pure education — or just 



for art's sake — he is up against the incontrovertible fact that 
it will produce some effect, for good or for bad, on its 
audiences." 

A lot of the customers know that, too. Responsibility runs 
from studio stage to theatre screen. 

* * * 

THE screen's performance across the years has been 
marked by a growing awareness of the debt of conscience 
which Mr. Warner so succinctly states. There have been, 
and will ever continue to be, shortcomings and erring enter- 
prises, but in the main the course of the motion picture has 
been in the service of the commonwealth. 

That has been an important element in the success of the 
screen and its rise to dominance as entertainment. It has 
offered the best for the most people for the least money. 
The stage has lost ground continuously since the motion pic- 
ture became competent, and the whole answer is not to be 
had in the economic advantages of picture production and 
distribution. A large part of it is in the greater responsive- 
ness of the films to the wishes, ideals and ambitions of the 
Common Man. 

The stage, losing to the films, sought to win by addressing 
itself to minorities with acutely socially conscious and message- 
laden drama. The result has been ever shrinking audiences. 
Now the stage is a fading art because it does not deliver to 
the people. It costs too much in saying too little to too few. 

So it comes that Mr. John Golden has made a gift of 
$100,000 to a fund and movement for "the cultural advance- 
ment of the legitimate theatre", as announced by the 
Dramatists Guild in New York. Mr. Golden says: "The theatre 
needs more playwrights and more good actors. For years a 
subsidized — national or civic — theatre, free to produce the 
finer things and at low prices for the people, has been 
devoutly wished." 

Half of Mr. Golden's gift is for that, and the rest for 
"encouragement and relief for dramatists, actors and others 
in the legitimate theatre". 

That rather tells the story. The truly popular arts, competent 
in the service of the multitudes, need no subsidies. They pay 
their way with profitable service. 

In a larger sense there is only one art — the art of expres- 
sion, the telling of stories and the conveyance of emotions. 
The older mediums, like stage and opera, wane into ineffective 
age, supported by the generosity of sentiment. The motion 
picture has prospered into its dominance as the new better 
way of saying and telling. It will stay dominant so long as it 
is the better way and continues its policy for serving the 
whole people. 



WAR and NEWSREELS 

AS was to be expected, last week's observation on this 
page about newsreels and the war has brought 
reverberations. It was stated flatly that the substi- 
tution of a pre-canned two-reeler from the War Department 
on the subject of the Invasion-to-come for what the newsreel 
editors had prepared on the same subject, and in the same 

[Continued on following page] 



THIS WEEK IN THE NEWS 



On to Chicago 



HOLLYWOOD was stoutly represented at the 
Republican National Convention at the Chi- 
cago Stadium this week. Louella Parsons, 
Hedda Hopper and Gracie Allen converged at 
the clambake equipped with typewriters, politi- 
cal primers and dizzy hats to aid in writing 
their columns. David O. Selznick and Cecil 
B. DeMille, producers, attended as delegates 
from California. Will H. Hays, president of the 
Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, was present, as an observer. Clare 
Booth Luce, who is related to the movies by 
marriage, was much in evidence, on the plat- 
form, over the air and before the news cameras. 
; She is always on Time. 

Miss Parsons, in her column Monday said 
the political big wigs asked her questions 
"about their screen favorites. They wanted to 
know about Lana Turner, Betty Grable, Clark 
Gable and all the others. I can't be rude," 
she explained, "so I must stop and tell them. 
But how am I going to get my political edu- 
cation if they insist on talking about movies." 

Miss Allen told reporters she was "positive- 
ly not running for president." At midweek, 
Mr. Dewey, who, up to Wednesday, was not 
running for president, was the convention's 
nominee. 



WAR and NEWSREELS 



[Continued from preceding page] 

intent, was an invasion of the newsreel and 
of the motion picture. It substituted two reels 
of pre-canned anticipation of the Invasion, 
prepared by the War Department, for the 
normal one-reel release of newsreel prepara- 
tion for the same occasion. For the first time 
in the history of the newsreels, and of this in- 
dustry, they missed an edition. That is no 
trivial precedent. It is no less than saying that 
the newsreels and the organized industry did 
not on this occasion adequately tend to their 
business. That is not correct. 

Meanwhile, among the reverberations, The 
Herald had not been on Broadway more than 
an hour last Friday when its editor had a call 
from the operating head of a major circuit, 
saying in effect that the decision to discard 
the newsreel and use the Government's two- 
reeler was in fact his and that of a contem- 
porary circuit operator. They liked the re- 
lease. The fundamental policy of the newsreel 
was not their special problem. So in sequel 
the newsreels elected to issue the two-reeler 
from the Government in lieu of the normal 
release. That version of the development, 
then, would put the operators of two circuits 
with a total of about fourteen hundred the- 
atres in the position of deciding policy for 
between fourteen and fifteen thousand the- 
atres which were not at the meeting. 

The reluctant newsreel editors made the 
decision in an official sense. It is said that 
even the War Department was astonished. 
The like probably will not happen again. 

— Terry Ramsaye 



SEE television adding to radio, with screen 
role minor Page 13 

RALLY nation's showmen for final push in 
Bond drive Page 15 

PRC to release forty to forty-five features 
next season Page 16 

EXPECT MGM to offer total of thirty-six in 
new season Page 16 

SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Hollywood Scene Page 37 

In the Newsreels Page 33 

Managers' Round Table Page 43 

IN PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION 

Showmen's Reviews Page 1969 

Advance Synopses Page 1971 



13 hit songs from screen, with only one from 
Broadway stage Page 17 

BRITISH Film Council delays pending report 
on monopoly Page 26 

J. ARTHUR Rank to produce story of Mary 
Magdalene Page 28 

BOX Office Champions for the month of 
May Page 36 



Picture Grosses Page 42 

Shorts on Broadway Page 41 

What the Picture Did for Me Page 40 

Short Subjects Chart Page 1972 

The Release Chart Page 1974 



Short Circuit 

NOT even the excitement of convention time 
and the customary genuflection to leading poli- 
ticians sways Western Union, only public me- 
dium for wired messages, from observance of 
the wartime ban on messages congratulatory. 

Thus, Wendell Willkie, 1940 presidential 
candidate, world traveler and writer, and chair- 
man of the board of Twentieth Century-Fox, 
on Wednesday found his wire to New York 
Governor Thomas E. Dewey, rejected. 

Mr. Willkie wanted to congratulate Mr. 
Dewey, from New York City to Albany, upon 
the latter's nomination that day in Chicago by 
the Republicans, 1,056 to 1, for the presidential 
candidacy. 

The Associated Press carried Mr. Willkie's 
message which, after congratulations, said in 
part: "You have one of the greatest opportuni- 
ties in history." 

The same day, Governor Dewey attempted 
to reply to Mr. Willkie, and late that afternoon 
it was not known whether Western Union was 
holding firm. 

Use of a national press service to carry a 
message is not precisely unknown to Holly- 
wood's public relations agents. 



until after the war. The camera plant, says 
the report, is devoted entirely to war work, 
producing precision instruments and parts of 
other mechanisms. "The alien property cus- 
todian holds 98 per cent of the voting stock of 
the company," says Mr. Burpee . . . "and the 
company never shall be allowed to return to 
German ownership. . . ." 



Easy Color 



Films for War 



ANTICIPATING the new demands of the 
war-made functions of photography in the mili- 
tary machine and concerns of government, it 
is announced by General Aniline & Film Cor- 
poration that its Ansco division, concerned 
with photosensitive materials, is to increase its 
capacity some 25 per cent with an investment 
of another million dollars in plant. This ap- 
peared in a report made Thursday to James 
E. Markham, alien property custodian, and his 
predecessor, Leo T. Crowley, through the pres- 
ident, George W. Burpee. The major part of 
Ansco's output for 1943 went to war. Much 
of the product pertains to specialized photo- 
graphic services about which little will be said 



THE great American snapshooter may now 
expose a -color film, develop it at home, and 
in 90 minutes produce a sparkling transparen- 
cy. No longer will he have to wait a week, 
and, during wartime, perhaps months, for that 
transparency. 

This boon was conferred on him this week 
by Ansco, successor to Agfa, which through 
photographic dealers and newspaper advertise- 
ments apprised the public of the development. 
Of the 90 minutes of processing, only 15 re- 
quire darkness. The chemicals required are 
comparatively few, are packaged for home use 
in kits, and are priced for the home user. The 
film is slightly less expensive than Koda- 
chrome, which requires processing by Eastman 
in Rochester. So far, it is available in cut 
film, and in 16mm. Newspaper and photo 
syndicate photographers have reported on it en- 
thusiastically. 

Servicing of the Hollywood industry with 
Ansco color film has not been decided. It is 
understood such servicing would require Ans- 
co plant expansion costing $8,000,000. 



Previewers 

THE Army maps its basic strategies with the 
aid of film. In four film rooms, deep in the 
Army's Pentagon Building headquarters, Wash- 
ington, D. C, high officers assemble regularly 
to see battle films rushed from the various 
fronts. They also see training and orientation 
films, produced by the Signal Corps and by 
Hollywood producers. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



Mr. 100% Rodger s 

THE sales manager's dream of one hundred 
per cent representation came true Wednesday 
when William F. Rodgers, vice-president and 
general sales manager of Metro-GolSwyn- 
Mayer, was notified in Cleveand, where he 
stopped enroute from the studio at Culver City, 
that through the cooperation of theatre own- 
ers, Leo-the-Lion would appear on the screen 
of every regularly operated motion picture 
theatre in the United States of which the sales 
department has a record. 

The final figures disclose that 16,459 thea- 
tres at some time during the Twenty- Year An- 
niversary Week, June 22-28, booked at least 
one subject from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

"It means," Mr. Rodgers said, "that many an 
exhibitor had to rearrange his schedule to in- 
clude an MGM subject in his program during 
the week of June 22-28. That is typical of 
the American showman of the motion picture 
business, and this recognition comes from the 
heart of the business man who has ever given 
unstintingly to the many activities of his com- 
munity." 



Like Peas in Pods 

'MIDST cocktails and trappings of the execu- 
tive dining room at Warner where the food 
standard has resisted some of the strictures of 
war, Ary Lima, general manager for that com- 
pany in Brazil, found time to say and ears to 
hear him say : 

"Brazilians and Americans have the same 
ideals, the same likes and dislikes — and that 
applies to motion pictures, to food and cloth- 
ing — and above all else, to our common ene- 
mies. ... I am pleased to find out that great 
care is being used by the studios to represent 
Latin-American types on the screen as they 
really are in Brazil and the other countries of 
Central and South America. 

"I am eager to tell the Brazilians about the 
work of the CIAA, the Motion Picture Society 
for the Americas, the thorough research and 
foreign departments, and the great staff of 
technical advisers. This, to me, is a practical 
demonstration of good neighborliness and 
courtesy." 



Four -Year Wind • 

MGM'S and David O. Selznick's "Gone With 
the Wind" closed at the Ritz theatre, Leicester 
Square, London, June 9 after a record run of 
four years and two months. London town 
won't be the same without it, according to C. 
A. Lejeune, writing in the New York Times 
last Sunday. Miss Lejeune said the film 
had become "a piece of social history. It has 
been the one constant factor in the changing 
fortunes of World Conflict No. 2." During the 
blitz, when many theatres had to close tem- 
porarily, the customers kept flocking to the 
Ritz to see Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler 
in Technicolor. 

The film played during the fall of Norway, 
the Low Countries and France; the Greek and 
Libyan campaigns; Pearl Harbor, Casablanca 
and Teheran : the North African invasion ; the 



Italian campaign and up to three days after 
the invasion of France. 

MGM statisticians who have been kept busy 
since 1939 tabulating the film's record runs, 
estimate the picture has been seen by a total of 
85,000,000 people throughout the world; 65,- 
000,000 in the U. S. and Canada and 20,000,000 
in foreign countries. 

When it closed at the Ritz in London it had 
chalked up a world's record of 232 consecutive 
weeks at a two-a-day policy. Nearly five years 
ago the picture opened day-and-date at the 
Empire, Palace and Ritz and after five weeks 
at the latter house it continued at both the Pal- 
ace and Empire for additional weeks and then 
reopened at the Ritz. The Selznick film will 
go on the road in England in a second nation- 
wide release. 



No Injunction 

FEDERAL Judge Samuel Mandelbaum in 
New York Tuesday denied May Davies Mar- 
tenet, author, her request for an injunction re- 
straining United Artists Corporation from dis- 
tributing "Voice in the Wind," produced by 
Robert Ripley and Rudolph Monter. 

Miss Martenet claimed the title of the film 
was unlawfully appropriated by the producers, 
whom she is not suing, and seeks an accounting 
of profits derived by United Artists from dis- 
tribution of the film because "Voice in the 
Wind" was the title of a novelette she wrote 
and which was published in McCall's Magazine 
in August, 1942. She had asked for an injunc- 
tion pending determination of her suit for dam- 
ages, stating she sold publication rights to the 
magazine but reserved film rights for herself. 

The distributors said they had spent large 
sums of money in advertising the film and had 
contracted and negotiated for more than 4,000 
showings of the picture. 

The court ruled that "Anyone may use (a 
title) unless some fraud is intended," and that 
"No such claim (of fraud) has been made 
here." 



Tennessee Feuds 

THE MAYOR of Milan, Tenn., J. M. Cros- 
well, is allowing the two local motion picture 
houses to continue their Sunday schedules in 
spite of the fact that a recent election resulted 
in a vote of 150 against Sabbath movies and 51 
in favor. The Mayor said the results did not 
reflect "the will of the people," because the 
polls closed at 4 P.M. instead of 7 P.M., deny- 
ing the toilers the right to cast a vote. 

In Jacksonville, Tenn., where theatres may 
operate on Sunday only if a "free will offering" 
is taken, two exhibitors, J. Virgil Posey and 
H. H. Blakeney were fined $50 each in City 
Court, officials claiming that a 25-cent contri- 
bution was compulsory. 

In Knoxville, Tenn., a new move has been 
started to bring film entertainment to the citi- 
zenry on Sundays. At Meridian, also same 
state, A. L. Royal, owner of the Royal and the 
Ritz, objected to the local clergy interfering 
with his Sabbath schedules, claiming "We are 
only receiving a contribution just the same as 
the preacher solicits a contribution in the 
church." 



Trouble in OCR 

TEMPORARY delay in the development of 
adequate theatre facilities for war production 
areas, a project which the Office of Civilian 
Requirements undertook several months ago, 
was seen in Washington Tuesday as the result 
of the recent resignation of John Eberson, 
theatre consultant to the War Production 
Board, and the reported resignation of George 
McMurphy, chief of the OCR amusement and 
recreation section. 

Only 68 new theatre and remodeling jobs 
have been approved by the OCR out of the 
potential 200 houses which the Government 
agency proposed eventually to provide. It is 
understood the amusement division's difficul- 
ties were climaxed last month when the pres- 
sure of non-theatrical amusement interests, in- 
cluding race track and bowling operators, for 
new facilities aroused a reluctance in WPB 
bureaus to authorize the use of highly critical 
war materials for amusement projects. The 
situation became so serious, it was said, that 
higher officials of OCR and WPB were under- 
stood to have taken a hand. 

Since that time, however, applications for 
new theatres have been held in abeyance with 
the explanation that the manpower situation, 
particularly on the west coast where Fox West 
Coast Theatres planned to build several thea- 
tres, made it impossible to divert labor from 
necessary war plant and war housing construc- 
tions. The Fox West Coast applications are 
still awaiting approval. 



Help Wanted 

CHICAGO night clubs, with or without na- 
tional conventions, have called upon Hollywood 
talent to come to their rescue and save them 
from the depression into which they have been 
thrust by the 30 per cent tax, which went to 
20 per cent this Saturday. The Chez Paree, 
local night club, has been spending an average 
of $8,000 to $10,000 a week for talent and has 
the William Morris Agency combing Holly- 
wood for film stars. So far, the agency has 
come up with Lena Home who is booked for 
August at a reported $3,500 a week. There is 
an attempt being made to bring Gracie Fields 
back in autumn. Ted Lewis is opening in 
July at the Rio Cabana in Chicago, and if, at 
$7,000 per week he fails to bring the crowds 
back, the club plans to give up the ghost. Sev- 
eral other name Hollywood entertainers are 
being approached, but none, as yet, has risen 
to the bait. 



Relief in Canada 

REPEAL of the 10 per cent war tax on films 
and accessories imported into Canada is pro- 
vided in the new Canadian budget, now tabled 
in the House of Commons, Ottawa. The bud- 
get also modifies film company and other cor- 
poration taxes, and would permit business 
losses in one year to be spread over three years 
for computation of corporation taxes. The 
Federal amusement tax remains at 20 per cent. 
Also remaining is the 100 per cent excess 
profits tax. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, published every Saturday by Ouigley Publishing Company, Rockefeller Center, New York City, 20. Telephone Circle 7-3100; Cable address "Quigpubco, New 
York." Martin Ouigley. President; Colvin Brown, Vice-President; Red Kann, Vice-President; T. J. Sullivan, Secretary; Terry Ramsaye, Editor; James D. Ivers, News Editor; Ray Gallagher, 
Advertising Manager; Chicago Bureau, 624 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 5; Hollywood Bureau, Postal Union Life Building, Hollywood, 28. William R. Weaver, editor; Toronto Bureau,' 
242 Millwood Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, W. M. Gladish, correspondent; Montreal Bureau, 265 Vitre St., West, Montreal, Canada, Pat Donovan, correspondent; London Bureau) 
4 Golden Square, London W I, Hope Williams Burnup, manager; Peter Burnup, editor; cable Ouigpubco London; Melbourne Bureau, The Regent Theatre, 191 Collins St., Melbourne, Australia, 
Cliff Holt, correspondent; Sydney Bureau, 17 Archbold Rd., Roseville, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia, Lin Endean, correspondent; Mexico City Bureau, Dr. Carmona y Valle 6, Mexico City] 
l.uis Becerra Celis, correspondent; Buenos Aires Bureau, J. E. Uriburi 126, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Natalio Bruski, correspondent; Rio de Janeiro Bureau, R. Sao Jose, 61, C. Postal 834, Rio 
de Janeiro,_ Brazil, Alfredo C. Machado, correspondent; Montevideo Bureau, P. O. Box 664, Montevideo, Uruguay, Paul Bodo, correspondent; cable Argus Montevideo. Member Audit Bureau 
of Circulations. All contents copyright 1944 by Ouigley Publishing Company. Address all correspondence to the New York Office, Other 0"igley Publications: Better Theatres, Motion Picture 
Daily, International Motion Picture Almanac, and Fame. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I. 1944 



THIS WEEK 



the Camera reports 





"WILSON". The somber person above is Alexander Knox, who portrays our 

First World War President in Darryl Zanuck's $4,000,000 super-feature, 

which Twentieth Century- Fox will begin to release this month in a number of 

special engagements, one of which, the world premiere, will be at the 

Roxy theatre, New York, the company's "key" house. 



Above, appropriately posed, are Mr. Knox and 
his leading lady, Geraldine Fitzgerald, who portrays 
Wilson's second wife in the Darryl Zanuck 
Technicolor production. 





20TH-FOX New York employees held their annual outing 
last week. In the picture above are Jane Harley, 
Spyros Skouras, president, Doris Downes, Annette Downes, 
and Francis L. bHarley, managing director for Great Britain. 




"JANIE". The Warner picturization of the Broadway stage success is 
represented here in two scenes, above and at the right. Above, Robert 
Hutton, Clare Foley and Joyce Reynolds ("Janie"); at the right, in a 
dramatic scene, are Miss Reynolds, Ann Harding, Robert Benchley, 
Miss Foley, Barbara Brown, and Edward Arnold. The picture, Warners' 
first production scheduled for the 1944-45 season, will be released 
September 2. 




I 10 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 




WELCOME HOME. Jane Powell, a former Portland, Ore., girl 

who made good in Hollywood and is the singing star of 

United Artists' "Song of the Open Road", is seen at her broadcast 

in Portland, with Jack Kleepper, UA salesman, and A. J. Sullivan, 

UA branch manager. The picture opened at the 

Broadway theatre there. 




ON THE SET of Paramount's "Star Bright" are 
Lieutenant Colonel C. R. Thompson, producer Lou Harris, left, and 
director Hugh Bennett. Colonel Thompson was formerly 
ordnance officer on Lieutenant General Mark Clark's staff, in Italy. 
Convalescing from illness contracted in Italy, he told the producers 
how important "light" films were for fighting men. 



A STAR IS BORN . . . 
Presenting "Miss 
XTC", Walt Lantz's 
new cartoon character, 
who made her debut 
in "The Greatest Man 
in Siam" and will 
soon be seen in 
"Abou Ben Boogie". 
She was named by 
Miss Eleanor Lukofsky, 
of the Comerford 
circuit, Scranton, who 
received a $100 Bond 
for her nomination. 
The judges in the 
name contest were 
Universal's Maurice 
Bergman, Andy Sha- 
rick, and Mr. Lantz. 





BONDS. The regional 
mid-Fifth War Loan drive 
meeting at LaSalle, III., 
brought many, including, 
in the group above, 
Ralph Lawlor, W. E. Ban- 
ford, Edward Zorn, 
W. G. Bishop, and 
James Murray. 

M.G.THOMAS has been 
appointed branch man- 
ager, at Cincinnati, for 
the Altec Service Cor- 
poration. The appoint- 
ment, by Warren Con- 
nor, district manager in 
Cincinnati for the com- 
pany, was announced 
from the home office in 
New York last week. 




MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 




BONDS, and a booth. This one, set in the lobby of the 
Des Moines theatre in the city of that name, has the 
added attraction of being "womanned" by Miss Betty Fort, 
daughter of Mrs. Pearl Fort, manager of the 
Eastown theatre, Des Moines. 




CONGRATULATIONS. Bob White, right, independent 
exhibitor and co-chairman of the WAC Fifth War Loan cam- 
paign in Oregon, is on the receiving end, at Portland. 
His well wisher is Kenneth M. Martin, executive manager 
of the state War Finance Committee. The occasion was the 
conclusion of the Bond sales meeting at the 
Henry Kaiser shipyard. 




IN PHILADELPHIA, at the Paramount exchange, 

Earle Sweigert, right, receives a bronze award for the sale of 

Bond seats, at the "Going My Way" premiere, from 

Louis J. Finske, while Ulrik Smith, left, watches. 



What they say 

ABOUT TELEVISION: 

The exploring cameraman finds most ex- 
hibitors undisturbed by the new medium 



The Question: Do you think tele- 
vision will bring star competition 
similar to the situation created 
by radio} 



DAVID MATE, Oxford Theatre, Little 
Falls. N. J.: "No ... and f think it 
will help stimulate the motion pic- 
ture business just the same as in the 
early days of radio people' heard 
stars such as Eddie Cantor and were 
anxious to see them in pictures." 



SIDNEY SAMUELSON, business man- 
ager. Eastern Pennsylvania Allied: 
"I do not think television will affect 
Him stars in their theatre aspect 
adversely. Radio builds up stars. I 
think that without doubt television 
will bid tor photogenic stars and in 
that sense be competition; but I still 
maintain the effect will be to build 
up the stars." 



MORRIS BROSKIE. State Theatre, 
West Orange, N. J.: "I personally 
think television will supersede pres- 
ent entertainment and I think it will 
also Improve our business ... by 
interesting the public. The compe- 
tition will be the same as now . . . 
I don't think there will be any 
monopoly. I do think that at the 
beginning the little fellows may per- 
haps be hurt by stars' appearance 
on television." 



HARRY KALMINE. Warner circuit 
general manager: "Television will 
have its own stars; It will make 
them, the same as radio. No mat- 
ter what medium of entertainment 
there is, anyway, the entertainers 
will go from one field to the other. 
I see no threat in it; no more so than 
in radio." 



MRS. HELEN HILDINGER. Hildinger 
circuit, Trenton, N. J.: "I feel that 
at first we will feel the competition 
very strongly, but I feel sure that, 
when the novelty wears off, we will 
again come into our own in the 
theatre. I think stars on television 
will enhance the attraction of the 
motion picture: people will want to 
see the stars again and again . . . 
and on film as well as television." 








12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD. JULY !, 1944 



SEE TELEVISION ADDING TO 
RADIO: SCREEN ROLE MINOR 



OUT of the babel of argument, prediction and worry that has stewed in 
recent months about the present and future of television there came two 
clear statements this week. 

M. H. AYLESWORTH, from his long experience as an authority on com- 
munications, ranging through the screen, radio and newspapers, concludes that 
television is primarily entertainment for the home, that it will be, in effect, 
principally an extension of the present function of radio and without any serious 
disturbance of the present motion picture functions or operations. 

He sees, further, an important role for Hollywood as a reservoir of ready- 
made talent and he is sure that equitable arrangements for the fulfillment of that 
role can be made. 

PAUL RAIBOURN, economist, engineer and television adviser to Paramount 
Pictures Corporation, arrives at the same conclusion, though by a somewhat 
different route. He sees little or no change in existing functions "until a sat- 
isfactory profit becomes, available" through television operation. Even then 
he thinks the motion picture industry will be capable of absorbing the im- 
pact and utilizing the new medium to extend its service. 

In both conclusions there is calm reassurance that the motion picture in- 
dustry as it is now constituted is well prepared, or will be, to retain its 
function, its audience — and its profits. 

Raibourn Says: 

Television "will not have much impact upon 
the motion picture or any other existing form 
of entertainment or culture" until a satisfactory 
profit becomes available, and then "you are 
going to see television jump in an extraordi- 
nary way." 

In the opinion of Paul Raibourn, economist, 
and television adviser to Paramount, the con- 
ditions which will make that satisfactory profit 
are already apparent, and within 10 years, he 
predicted, "television will have replaced a large 
part of our facilities for dissemination of in- 
telligence." 

Mr. Raibourn delivered a critical analysis 
of television's relation to motion pictures, to 
the Radio Executives' Club Television Semi- 
nar in New York last week. 

Motion Picture Film vs. 
Electrical Television 

In arriving at definitions of factors involved 
in analyzing television in its relation to films, 
Mr. Raibourn said: 

"We thus conclude that, basically, it is mo- 
tion picture film versus electrical television 
which represent intrinsically different media 
and that if there is any real question of 'who' 
will shove 'who' around, it is a problem of 
Eastman Kodak, Dupont and Ansco as against 
the Telephone Company, Radio Corporation, 
General Electric, Philco and DuMont rather 
than broadcasting companies as against so- 
called motion picture companies. These two 
latter groups are probably more likely to help 
each other than to hurt each other as they build 
talent for each other and make it popular. Mo- 
tion picture companies may make films for tele- 
vision and television may supplement feature 
film fare in theatre programs. On the other 
hand, television might displace 16mm movies 
in the home or schools in a reasonable period 
of time and thereby destroy the dream of the 
film manufacturing companies of expansion. 

Television's one important Characteristic, its 




PAUL RAIBOURN: "Broadcasting com- 
panies and motion picture companies are 
probably more likely to help each other 
than to hurt each other. . . ." 

ability to record events as they happen is also 
an economic characteristic, Mr. Raibourn not- 
ed. At present that procedure is expensive, 
but it is important because the emotional im- 
pact of certain events demand they be viewed 
as they happen, he pointed out. 

Films not only allow the scene to be viewed 
later ; they allow the choice of the viewing time, 
Mr. Raibourn also noted ; emphasizing that that 
time may be selected at the convenience of the 
audience, and in addition "an order of prece- 
dence can be arranged by which those who see 
are placed in the same time sequence as their 
willingness to pay a large or small amount for 
that privilege." 

Mr. Raibourn then examined the visual im- 
pact of the two mediums, noting a difference 
which, he said, "time will perhaps overcome." 
He alluded to television's "more or less" visu- 

(Continued on following page, column 1) 



Aylesworth Says: 

"Television will not take the place of the 
feature motion picture in the theatre but will 
serve primarily as an added attraction," in the 
opinion of Merlin Hall Aylesworth, executive 
counselor and specialist in communications. 

"Television is basically entertainment for 
the home and, therefore, in my opinion, will 
not prove serious competition for the mo- 
tion picture industry. Hollywood, however, 
will play an important role in the television 
to come," Mr. Aylesworth declared in an in- 
terview in his office high in RCA's towering 
Radio City home. 

First president of the National Broadcasting 
Company in 1926, which post he held for 10 
years, Mr. Aylesworth has had practical knowl- 
edge of the film industry during his career as 
attorney and radio and newspaper executive. 
From 1935 to 1937 he was chairman of the 
board of Radio-Keith-Orpheum Corp., RKO 
Radio Pictures and Pathe News. He still is 
chairman of the board of Radio City Music 
Hall. 

Sees Place of Television 
In Theatre Limited 

Mr. Aylesworth was emphatic in declaring 
that "although television will have its base in 
'pictures,' it will be serviced by the radio in- 
dustry and sold to sponsors by the broadcast- 
ers." Theatre television, he thinks, will prove 
too costly for the average exhibitor and its 
place on the theatre entertainment program, 
therefore, will be limited. 

The radio executive stressed three major 
avenues of opportunity in discussing the future 
course of television in relation to the film in- 
dustry. 

1. Producing companies will utilize tele- 
vision for trailers of their own product, 
"bringing the trailer right into the home." 

2. Hollywood will produce pictures with 
star talent which the telecasting companies 
will sell to sponsors. 

3. Theatres will use television for special 
events. 

In connection with this third point, Mr. 
Aylesworth pointed out that television in the 
theatre "will not be a novelty but definitely 
will be a permanent part of the theatre program. 
The exhibitor will use television for special 
events such as prize fights, racing, sports, pub- 
lic events of national importance, political party 
conventions, etc." 

Predicts Television Will 
Support Box Office 

"If after the war, there is a slump at the box 
office, which we can expect to a slight degree, 
exhibitors will rely upon television to bring in 
the customers," he predicted, indicating that 
the cost involved for installing television would 
be justified in this instance. 

Mr. Aylesworth expressed the view that 
"after the war, I think you will see no depres- 
sion here. However, I hope it won't be a big 
boom," implying that a false prosperity would 
result in the inevitable recession. "Adjustments 
will be made for reconversion to peacetime 
economy and particularly to help the labor situ- 
ation. But there won't be the post-war depres- 

(Continued on following page, column 2) 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



13 



"SCREEN CAN HOLD POSITION" 



{Continued from preceding page) 

al imperfection as "compared with motion pic- 
tures" ; and divided the imperfections into two 
classes : artistic, and "those inherent in the phy- 
sical media." 

Of artistic imperfections, he said: "These 
are usually a result of the spontaneity and the 
lack of time which television has to make its 
record — and also are economic." He added 
that in the making of a picture, however, there 
is "more second guessing than most outside the 
studios realize." 

Analyzes Relative Costs of 
Pictures and Television 

And, of the economic angle, he added that 
in films Grade A features cost for negative 
and positive from $500,000 to $4,000,000 for 
from 60 to 150 minutes of playing time, giving 
a cost of from $8,000 to $25,000 per minute; 
and that, *in television entertainment, "how 
such sums can be profitably handled except 
by a direct return from every possible listener 
and values in accordance with the benefits re- 
ceived, is unknown at the present time." 

Of imperfections inherent in the media, Mr. 
Raibourn said: 

"As to the relative limitations of the physi- 
cal media involved the very best a 35 milli- 
meter theatrical motion picture can now do 
would be a comparative standard of 1,200 to 
1,400 lines .as compared with the theoretical 
possible 525 at present available on television. 

"At 525 lines I should say increasing the 
number of lines will not add much picture qual- 
ity unless brilliance is increased above the de- 
gree usual at present. 

Mr. Raibourn then examined television in 
relation to the entertainment provided by motion 
picture shorts. Their costs, running from $1,- 
000 to $8,000 per minute, begin, he said, to 
"merge with the higher range of sound broad- 
casting costs" ; and he added : "If the relative 
values of sight and sound as selling media are 
anywhere near what we are all assuming they 
are, it is possible advertisers will be willing 
to put advertising on before their public at 
an amount which will correspond to these 
figures." 

Doubts Theatres Will Be for 
Television Exclusively 

Mr. Raibourn doubts exclusively television 
theatre. There is not enough material, unless 
the programs comprise soap operas and 
education, and he observes, the public does not 
like these in the theatre. He explained why 
Paramount, producer, distributor, and theatre 
owner, supported television. 

The largest theatre owner, the company 
keeps daily records of attendance. Attendance 
varies with production, weather, season and 
opposition. It also varies with events of na- 
tional interest, such as prize fights, Presidential 
talks. 

The theatre business being of fixed cost, large 
attendance decreases can turn weeks ordinari- 
ly profitable into losses. 

Television, Mr. Raibourn said, could "ac- 
centuate this tendency." 

In 1937 and 1938, Paramount inquired about 
television, was told no apparatus was available 
for it, decided to develop its own. 

"Since then," he said, "our study has con- 
vinced us that the theatre will lend certain 
values to television which are not possible in 
the ordinary home assembly." These values, 
he said, were not ready for disclosure. 




Staff Photo 



M. H. AYLESWORTH: "Television in the 
theatre will not be a novelty, but ... if 
there is a post-war slump at the box office, 
exhibitors will find that it will bring in the 
customers."- 

Urges Definition 
Of FCC Power 

{Continued from preceding page) 

sion which followed the last war because indus- 
try and Government are planning better," he 
said. 

Within five years after the war he prophesied 
there would be 2,000,000 television sets in the 
United States. Queried on what he thought of 
the theory advanced by Columbia Broadcasting 
System recently that television set manufactur- 
ers hold back product for five years until all 
technical improvements ' had been made after 
the war, Mr. Aylesworth replied, "I don't know 
the CBS theory, or the NBC or RCA theory. 
All I know is that the public will want televi- 
sion right after the war. They'll buy television 
sets and if a new model comes along with more 
improvements a year or two later, they'll buy 
that one. Before the war people bought auto- 
mobiles every year. If they have the money 
and the desire they'll buy new television sets. 
Set manufacturers, perhaps, will arrange for 
trade-ins the way car manufacturers do. But 
the important thing is that the public will want 
to see television in their homes." 

Expects Telecasters to 
Develop Own Talent 

Hollywood talent, Mr. Aylesworth believes, 
will be used more for pictures made in the stu- 
dios which will be sold by the radio companies 
to sponsors than for straight dramatic or enter- 
tainment pictures. The telecasters, he said, 
will develop their own talent, the way radio 
built up its program talent, but if star live 
talent is needed, the motion picture companies 
will furnish it. 

Asked whether the radio industry would have 
to expand greatly its self-regulatory morals 
code to meet the new needs of television, Mr. 
Aylesworth said, "I don't see any great public 
policy question in television different from that 
of radio. Of course, it is true that television 
will be the uninvited guest in the home, and 



therefore will be somewhat different to handle, 
but the industry will structurally strengthen its 
code without any difficulty. After all," he added, 
"radio has had a very good record in this direc- 
tion for years. You know, people won't accept 
things on the radio that they do in the motion 
picture theatre." 

Mr. Aylesworth's principal interest at the mo- 
ment is to see a new Federal Communications 
Act drafted and passed by Congress. In dis- 
cussing his own ideas for a new law as pro- 
posed in an article published June 19 in Broad- 
cast Advertising, he reiterated that the entire 
radio industry should have a hand in drafting 
the new bill. He doesn't believe that legislators 
know the radio business sufficiently to be able 
to write the new Act without guidance. 

Urges Communications Act 
Be Made More Explicit 

Briefly, Mr. Aylesworth proposes that the 
new Communications Act be more explicit in 
defining the powers and duties of the Federal 
Communications Commission "beyond the 
standard of 'public interest, convenience andi 
necessity' which, like a kimono, covers every- 
thing but touches nothing." 

He proposes that a "single administrator' 
be appointed to handle the licensing of radio"* 
stations and that a separate "court of appeals' 
be set up to aid the administrator in his func 
tioning. He advocates business practice regul 
ation by the Federal Trade Commission whicl 
now governs other communication media lik 
newspapers and magazines and also examine 
radio scripts. The new act, he recommends; 
also should take into consideration the futur i 
problems which will arise out of the develop 
ment of television and frequency modulatio: 
broadcasting." 



Preview Picture 
For Telecasting 

The first film production for telecasting, by tl 
new RKO Television Corporation, was previewei 
by trade press writers Friday last, at the Pat! 
New York home office. National Broadcasts 
Company press representatives squired the write™ 
into the projection room, explaining that the a j 
proximately 30 minutes of silent newsreel clijj 
would be supplemented by other footage, and bof 
groups integrated, in a sequence to be determine 
by events, in the NBC television coverage Mond;j 
night, of the Republican Convention in Chicago. ! 

The coverage comprised the footage shown afl 
footage made by RKO through Pathe for NBC 
the convention and flown to New York for t| | 
Monday night and subsequent telecasts whi 
through relay systems covered New York, Schenej 
tady and Philadelphia. 

As a first production, the footage is of mentio.il 
as a production for television, it may not fairly | 
judged, even when accompanied by narration, whii. 
was written over the weekend by NBC pfi 
sonnel and on Monday night to be narrated \ \ 
them. It is not original ; it is a library collectic ( 
its approach is necessarily the motion picture i) 
p roach. Whatever originality of approach was J 
be seen on the television receiver was in i| 
sequence of the clips and the commentary wl 
them.— F. E. S. 



Aid ODT Travel Drive 

The Office of Defense Transportation in its n 
drive against civilian travel, will use every av; 
able publicity channel, including a film bulk 
titled. "Last Furlough," for July 20 release. 



14 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, I 



RALLY NATION'S SHOWMEN IN 
FINAL BOND DRIVE PUSH 



Premieres Set New Record 
as Leaders Urge Need for 
Sustained Effort 

As the Fifth of the War Loans backing the 
global battle fronts drove through to its final 
week, Bond sale figures leveled off, leaving high 
figures of the early buying surge dangling, and 
causing Claude F. Lee, the industry's consult- 
ant to the U. S. Treasury, to address a plea to 
the exhibitors of the country. 

Air. Lee announced that up to Wednesday 
night of last week, when the drive was ap- 
proaching the half-way mark, $1,081,000,000, or 
18 per cent of the $6,000,000,000 quota for in- 
dividual sales, had been recorded, which, said 
Mr. Lee, "is neither good nor bad," adding, 
"the real situation is that the public is ready 
to buy Bonds, but they have to be contacted, 
(and) it is up to the theatre men of the country 
to put forth greater efforts and to see that 
everyone possible is contacted." 

War Bond Premieres 
Set New Record 

The brightest spot on the industry's drive 
horizon was the announcement that new re- 
cords in the scheduling of War Bond premieres 
were being recorded. 

Robert J. O'Donnell, national chairman, an- 
nounced Tuesday that 4,715 premieres had been 
booked, as compared with a Fourth War Loan 
total of 3,182. Other figures announced by Mr. 
O'Donnell show 4,809 exhibitors were commit- 
ted to Free Movie Day, against 3,403 for the 
previous drive, and 891 children's premieres. 
The total of all special events, as announced by 
the national chairman, had reached 10,415. The 
national committee pointed out that the figures 
were incomplete, that more events were still 
being scheduled. 

On the boardwalk in Atlantic City the Warner 
theatre last week held a premiere augmented by 
a traveling troupe of Hollywood and radio 
stars and the Army Air Forces Training Com- 
mand orchestra, sold all of the theatre's 4,200 
seats for Bonds ranging from $25 to $50,000 
per seat, and raised $6,215,250, a Fifth War 
Loan record to date. 

In Wyoming scheduled premieres hit the 
100 per cent mark, the first state in the history 
of the War Activities Committee to report all 
theatres participating. E. J. Schulte, exhibitor 
chairman for the state, made the report and 
added that 93 per cent of Wyoming's theatres 
would hold Free Movie Days, and 75 per cent 
were scheduled to run Children's Premieres. 

Suggests Bond Booths in 
Exchange Buildings 

Ned E. Depinet, national distributor chair- 
man, last week suggested that every film ex- 
change follow the example set in Detroit, 
where a Bond booth was set up in the Film 
Exchange Building, attended by the wives, 
mothers and sisters of film distribution people 
located in the building. In Philadelphia, in the 
Paramount exchange projection room, Earl W. 
Sweigert, district manager for Paramount, held 
a premiere and sold 33 seats for a total of $825,- 
000 in Bonds. 

Robert J. O'Donnell, heading the industry's 
drive, was informed late last week by Her- 
man Gluckman that the film bulletin, ''Young' 



BACK FREE MOVIE DAY, 
O'DONNELL URGES 

Robert J. O'Donnell, heading 
the industry's drive for War 
Bonds, made a plea Monday to 
exhibitors to mobilize in full 
strength for Free Movie Day, 
July 6. 

"This is a vital and urgent call 
for extra effort," said Mr. O'Don- 
nell. "We must get more exhib- 
itors to participate in Free Movie 
Day." The lull in the sale of 
"E" Bonds, as reflected in reported 
national sales total, was the basis 
of Mr. O'Donnell's plea. 

At the same time it was an- 
nounced that on July 5 there would 
be an unprecedented radio barrage 
publicizing Free Movie Day. Net- 
works and local stations are mak- 
ing tieups with the industry in 
promoting the event. 



America Backs the Fighting Fifth," had been 
released with all newsreels, and that last Sat- 
urday Bond trailer No. 3, "From Your Boy 
Over There," formerly titled "Dawn of D- 
Day," was released. Fifteen thousand prints 
of the trailer were ready for distribution. 

Mr. O'Donnell also announced that special 
recordings with a Bond drive appeal had been 
made by 12 Hollywood stars, and had been sent 
theatres for use as lobby broadcasts. 

Tuesday all the 14 theatres in Reading, Pa., 
held simultaneous premieres, with the indepen- 
dents, Warners and Loew's collaborating. The 
idea was originated by J. Lester Stallman, man- 
ager of the Schad interests in Reading, and 
WAC chairman for Bucks County. The pre- 
mieres received the support of newspapers, ra- 
dio and county and city officials. 

Loew's Theatres' Total 
Reached $6,200,300 

At a rally held last Friday home office em- 
ployees of Loew's Theatres, MGM and Station 
WHN, pledged $325,000 in extra Bonds. Mon- 
day it was announced that Loew's Theatres, 
through the period June 1 to June 23, sold $6,- 
200,300 in Bonds as compared to $2,854,000 for 
the same period in the Fourth War Loan. The 
Pitkin theatre led Loew's New York theatres, 
and the Capitol in Washington the out-of-town 
theatres. In the first two weeks RKO Thea- 
tres sold a total of $1,982,475, not counting 
premieres. 

Columbia Pictures made a corporate pur- 
chase of $2,000,000 in Bonds, apart from pur- 
chases made by employees of the company. The 
company's quota is $3,250,000. 

Up to Thursday of last week the Southern 
California division of Fox West Coast Thea- 
tres had sold a total of 41,902 "E" Bonds, 
amounting to $3,168,075, according to Charles 
P. Skouras, president of National Theatres, in 
a telegram to Mr. O'Donnell. The comparable 
figures for the Fourth War Loan were 13,- 
464 Bonds, amounting to $725,000. The cir- 



cuit has scheduled a number of special events 
for its theatres, including premieres. 

Henry Reeve, president of Texas Theatre 
Owners, Inc., last week, at his own expense, 
organized a series of War Bond meetings in 
San Antonio, Austin and Brownwood, rallying 
independent theatre owners. 

L. A. Mercier of the Mercier theatre, who 
is also the Mayor of Fredericktown, Mo., 
passed his Bond quota at a rally featuring Pap- 
py Cheshire, star of Republic Pictures and 
radio. 

One Delaware Premiere 
Brings in $1,350,000 

In the state of Delaware Wednesday night 
of last week, 14 premieres were held, bringing 
in a total of $1,350,000 in Bonds at one pre- 
miere alone, the Warner theatre in Wilming- 
ton, and $10,000 at Wilmington's only Negro 
theatre, the National, which is managed by 
John O. Hopkins. 

On the same night a capacity crowd bought 
$1,203,375 in Bonds to witness a premiere at 
the Lincoln theatre in Miami Beach, Fla. With 
the premiere was a musical revue, "Sky An- 
chors," given by the OPA Locha Navy Air 
Corps, and an auction which brought close to 
$200,000 in sales. 

At a Fifth War Loan Boxing Carnival spon- 
sored jointly by the Texas WAC, the Houston 
War Sports Activities Committee and the Elks 
Club Bond group, held at the Coliseum in 
Houston, the Bond cash register registered a 
sale of $22,080,000. National Committee 
Chairman O'Donnell flew to Houston from 
New York to act as master of ceremonies. 

790 Metropolitan Houses 
Sold 21% of "E" Bonds 

At the Empire theatre in Fall River, Mass., 
managed by William S. Canning, $102,675 in 
Bonds were sold in the first six days of the 
drive. 

Charles C. Moskowitz, chairman of New 
York's metropolitan district, reported that from 
the period of June 1 to 17, a total of 790 thea- 
tres sold 21.6 per cent of all "E" Bonds sold 
in that area, the aggregate theatre sales 
amounting to $8,275,871. 

Monday the national committee received a 
telegram from Harry F. Shaw, state chairman 
for Connecticut, stating that special preliminary 
events in the state raised $1,211,896 in Bond 
sales. 

In 15 small towns in Texas special events 
raised $5,776,000 in sales. 



MGM'S "Dragon Seed" Set 
For Music Hall Run 

MGM's top-budget production, "Dragon Seed," 
starring Katharine Hepburn and Walter Huston, 
and based on the Pearl S. Buck novel, will follow 
Columbia's "Once Upon a Time" into Radio City 
Music Hall, the theatre announced this week. The 
Columbia film opened at the Music Hall Thursday. 
MGM plans to sell "Dragon Seed" separately, 
away from its regular blocks next season. 



Jacob Lasker Dies 

Jacob Lasker, 78, exhibitor in Chicago in the 
early days of films, died there Monday, and was 
buried Wednesday in Memorial Park Cemetery. 
He owned the Jacob Lasker and Sons circuit. His 
widow, Ida, and two sons, Harry and Ben, survive. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



15 



PRC to Release 40-45 
For Next Season 



Product to Be Divided into 
Two Groups, McCarthy 
Tells Sales Meeting 

PRC Pictures will release between 40 and 
45 features, including Westerns, during 1944- 
45, it was announced by Leo J. McCarthy, gen- 
eral sales manager, at the company's fifth an- 
nual sales convention held in New York 
Wednesday through Friday at the Essex 
House. 

Leon Fromkess, vice-president in charge of 
production, arrived in New York from Hol- 
lywood Tuesday, heading the out-of-town dele- 
gation to the meeting. 

PRC product would be divided into two 
groups, Mr. McCarthy said. The first is 
known as the "Army" group, with divisions 
consisting of four "Generals," eight "Colonels" 
and eight "Majors." The second, or Navy 
group, consists of four "Admirals," eight 
"Commanders" and eight "Captains." 

To Produce More of Product 

Mr. McCarthy, who presided at all the ses- 
sions, said that PRC "plans to produce more 
and more of its own product, especially with 
the higher budgeted pictures" and announced 
that the first of the new season's releases would 
be "Dixie Jamboree," with Frances Langford, 
Guy Kibbee, Louise Beavers, Lyle Talbot. 

Another film scheduled for early release next 
season is "Bluebeard," a psychological murder 
story featuring John Carradine, Jean Parker, 
Nils Asther and Henry Kolker. 

"When the Lights Go on Again," now shoot- 
ing, directed by William K. Howard and featur- 
ing Jimmie Lydon, Grant Mitchell, Regis 
Toomey among others, also will be released 
early in the new season. Jimmie Lydon also 
will be featured in a new series which the com- 
pany will produce. The young actor will be 
cast with Freddie Bartholomew. First in this 
group with be "They Eloped One Night," 
scheduled to start shooting late in July. 

Martha Tilton, radio star, recently signed 
for a series of PRC pictures, has completed her 
first feature, "Swing Hostess," which Sigmund 
Neufeld produced. 

In the "Army" group, in addition to "Dixie 
Jamboree," "They Eloped One Night," "Blue- 
beard" and "Swing Hostess," are: "I'm from 
Arkansas," "Fog Island," "I Accuse My Par- 
ents," "His Adopted Daughter," "Here We Go 
Again," "For the Love of Mike," "Hollywood 
and Vine" and "G.I. Guy." The last four in 
this group will be produced by PRC. 

Ritter and O'Brien in Westerns 

Included in the "Army" classification will be 
the first four of a series of eight Texas Ranger 
Westerns co-starring Tex Ritter and Dave 
O'Brien, and four of the eight Buster Crabbe 
Westerns. 

"Crime, Inc.," heads the "Navy" group. 
Others are "Queen of Burlesque," "War 
Marriage " "Wife of Monte Cristo," "Swamp 
Man," "Drums of Death," "Hannah from Sa- 
vannah," "Kid Sister," "Bombshell of Brazil," 
"Eastside-Westside," starring Benny Fields, 
and the remaining Texas Ranger and Buster 
Crabbe releases. 

Franchise holders and branch managers who 
attended included: 

Albany-Buffalo, Bernie Mills, Leo Murphy, 



Jack Berkson, George Miller, Ben Smith ; At- 
lanta, Ike Katz, Harry Katz; Boston, Zippy 
Goldman, Harry Gibbs, Sam Levine; Chicago, 
Henri Elman, M. Van Praag; Cincinnati- 
Cleveland, Nat Lefton, Harry Bugie, Rudy 
Mueller; Denver-Salt Lake, J. H. Ashby; De- 
troit, William Flemion, Anne O'Donnell ; In- 
dianapolis, Joe Bohn, Sam Abrams; Kansas 
City, Beverly Miller, John Muchmore ; Little 
Rock, B. F. Busby; Los Angeles, Sam Decker, 
Harry Stern; Milwaukee, Ben Marcus, Joe 
Strother ; Minneapolis, Abbott Schwartz ; New 
York, Sidney Kulick, Lt. Commander Bert 
Kulick, Seymour Jonas, Frances Kulick; Okla- 
homa City, E. L. Walker, Harry McKenna; 
Omaha-Des Moines, Harry Rogers ; Philadel- 
phia, Herbert Given, Mrs. H. Given; Pitts- 
burgh, Lew Lefton; St. Louis, Andy Dietz; 
San Francisco, Armand Cohn, Sam Sobel ; Se- 
attle-Portland, Lloyd Lamb, Harriet Lamb; 
Washington, George Gill, Fred Sandy; Can- 
ada, Harry Allen; New Orleans, Phil Sliman. 

Home office executives who were present in- 
cluded : Mr. McCarthy, Fred Rohrs, assistant 
to Mr. McCarthy; Roberto Socas, foreign ex- 
port manager; Jerry Edwards, legal depart- 
ment ; Harry Blair, eastern publicity manager ; 
S. S. Kestenbaum, field exploitation; John Co- 
sentino, in charge of exchange operations; D. 
P. Wiener, accounting department, and Janet 
Rosenthal, in charge of prints. 



Universal Holds Southern 
Conference in Atlanta 

Universal Pictures opened its southern sales con- 
ference in Atlanta Wednesday at the Biltmore Ho- 
tel. The conferences were continued through Fri- 
day. Sales representatives from New Orleans, 
Memphis, Charlotte and Atlanta were present to 
hear Maurice Bergman, the company's advertising 
director, discuss advertising plans. 

F. J. A. McCarthy, southern divisional sales 
manager, who presided as chairman, said that Uni- 
versal for the season of 1944-45 would release 55 
features, seven in Technicolor. 

Among the pictures scheduled for production 
are a Deanna Durbin film in Technicolor, another 
with Charles Boyer co-starring with Miss Durbin, 
and three Abbott and Costello comedies. 



Paramount Film Service, Ltd., 
In Toronto Sales Meeting 

Paramount Film Service, Ltd., opened a two- 
day sales conference Wednesday at the King Ed- 
ward Hotel in Toronto, with Charles M. Reagan, 
general sales manager, and Oscar Morgan, short 
subjects sales manager, on hand from New York. 
The district manager in Toronto, Gordon Light- 
house, presented Canadian sales policies for the 
new year coming up. Among the branch managers 
in attendance were Jack L. Hunter of Toronto, 
Tom Dowbiggin of Montreal, P. J. Hogan of 
St. John, D. M. Brickman of Winnipeg, W. O. 
Kelly of Calgary and Russel Simpson of Van- 



Monogram Releasing Six 
Features in July 

Monogram will release six productions in July, 
reaching the highest point of its current schedule. 
"Range Law" will reach the exhibitors July 1. 
July 8 marks the general release of "Johnny 
Doesn't Live Here Any More." "Are These Our 
Parents?" is to be released generally June 15. 
July 23 will be "Three of a Kind," and July 29, 
"Marked Trails" and "Call of the Jungle" will be 
released. 



Expect Metro to 
Have 36 Features 
In New Season 

While Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is on the way to 
winding up the current season with 35 features, 
production plans for next season call for a mini- 
mum of 36 features, with more top budget pictures 
scheduled than ever before. Production appro- 
priations for 1944-45 aggregate between $40,000,000 
and $45,000,000. Plans call for the production of 
the same number of shorts as this season. 

The 35 MGM releases for the current season 
include "Tunisian Victory," made jointly by the 
United States and British Army staffs. The 34 
films made on the MGM lot cost, on the average, 
an estimated $1,500,000, twice the average per pic- 
ture before Pearl Harbor. Rising labor and ma- 
terial costs and unforeseen delays are held re- 
sponsible for the doubled production costs. It is 
believed that the return of stars and directors 
from the Army, such as Clark Gable and others, 
may serve to pare the production costs. 

The company had 12 pictures in each of its first 
two blocks this season, which were the fifth and 
sixth groups, five in the seventh and has set two 
for the eighth, the smallest the company has ever 
released as a package, necessitated by the demand 
for product by many first run houses throughout, 
the country. The eighth block will be composed 
of "Bathing Beauty," set for release July 14, and 
"The Canterville Ghost," the third week in July. 

It is said that William F. Rodgers, vice-presi- 
dent and general sales manager, plans to rush re- 
leases of "White Cliffs of Dover," which already 
has a number of first run bookings set through 
the summer ; "Dragon Seed," which is to follow, 
and "An American Romance." These films, along 
with "Tunisian Victory," will bring the company's 
release schedule to 35. 

Eight pictures recently finished and now in the 
stages of editing may be set by Mr. Rodgers as the 
ninth block shortly after his return to New York 
from Hollywood, where he has been viewing prod- 
uct. The eight include "Gold Town" (tentative 
title), "Kismet," in Technicolor; "Lost in a 
Harem," "Maisie Goes to Reno," "Marriage Is a 
Private Affair," "Meet Me in St. Louis," in Tech- 
nicolor ; "National Velvet," in Technicolor, and 
"The Seventh Cross." The latest Greer Garson- 
Walter Pidgeon film, "Mrs. Parkington," is almost 
finished, but plans have not yet been made for it. 

The company has 10 pictures in production 
and 14 in different stages. Costs on current pro- 
ductions are understood to run about as follows : 
$3,000,000 for "Dragon Seed," $2,500,000 for "An 
American Romance," $3,000,000 for "Thirty Sec- 
onds Over Tokyo" and "Kismet," $2,000,000 for 
"National Velvet" and "Ziegfeld Follies," and $2,- 
500,000 for "Bathing Beauty." 



Pre-release Dates Are 
Set on "Mark Twain" 

"The Adventures of Mark Twain," which War- 
ner Bros, will place in general release July 22, 
will open for pre-release engagements before that 
date in about 100 situations. 

The popular-price premiere of the picture, which 
played approximately 200 special dates limited to 
one week early last month, takes place July 7 at 
the Maestic, Providence. The following week it 
returns to Broadway for a run at the New York 
Strand, and also opens at the Capitol, Springfield; 
Roger Sherman, New Haven, and Metropolitan, 
Boston. 

Other mid-July dates already set include the 
Orpheum, Seattle; State, Spokane; Strand, Mar- 
shalltown; Strand, Hartford; Palace, South Nor- 
walk; Branford, Newark; 20th Century, Buffalo; 
Majestic, Houston; Orpheum, Dubuque; Mary 
Anderson, Louisville; Stanley, Jersey City; Fabi- 
an, Paterson ; Montauk, Passaic ; Mount Baker, 
Bellingham ; Capitol, Vancouver ; Palace, Colum- 
bus ; Iowa, Cedar Rapids ; Warner, Milwaukee ; 
Queen, Wilmington; Grand, Lancaster; Capitol, 
York; Cambria, Johnstown; Centre, Salt Lake 
City; Orpheum and Colonial, Ogden; Montana, 
Butte ; Earle and Ambassador, Washington ; 
Strand, Cumberland; Colonial, Bluefield, W. Va. 



16 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



13 HIT SONGS FROM SCREEN; 
ONLY ONE FROM BROADWAY 



Indicative of Movement of 
Tin Pan Alley to Coast; 
Songs Aid Exploitation 

The song-pluggers have deserted Broadway 
for Hollywood. The revolution which began 
with "The Jazz Singer" in 1927 is complete. 

During the second week of June, 1944, 13 of 
the 25 songs most frequently played over the 
radio networks were from the scores of motion 
pictures and only one was from a Broadway 
musical show. Eleven were original publica- 
tions. In sheet music sales during the same 
week the screen led the stage about four to 
one, and the leader of the Hit Parade that week 
was from a picture, not an uncommon honor 
for screen hits. 

Analysis of the figures was made by music 
publishing companies affiliated with Warner 
Brothers, producers of the Jolson musical which 
started the march. 

Music Publisher and Film 
Relations on Firm Ground 

For the past several years the relation of the 
motion picture to the music publishers has 
?rown steadily. Today the relationship is es- 
tablished on firm ground. 

Sometimes a picture popularizes a song, and 
sometimes vice versa. Exploitation of screen 
scores is a two-way proposition. The exploi- 
tation is largely in the hands of the music 
publishers. Several of the major companies 
have either direct or indirect tieups with cer- 
tain publishers. Some of the companies own 
publishers outright, others have a financial in- 
terest, still others a working agreement. The 
publishers throw all their resources into what 
Tin Pan Alley commonly refers to as plugging 
a number, and, plugged, the number goes from 
publisher to radio to the screen and on to bath- 
tubs. 

Under the operating title of Music Publish- 
ers Holding Corporation the publishing firms 
of Remick Music Corporation, M. Witmark 
and Sons and Harms, Inc., handle the music 
interests of Warner Brothers. 

Among Warner tunes listed among the lead- 
ers at the time of the survey were: "As Time 
iGoes By," from the film "Casablanca"; "Time 
Waits for No One," from "Shine On, Harvest 
Moon," "Some Day I'll Meet You Again," 
from "Passage to Marseille"; "They're Either 
j Too Young or Too Old," "How Sweet You 
1 Are" and the title song from "Thank Your 
Lucky Stars." 

Twentieth Century-Fox Has No 
Music Subsidiary 

Twentieth Century-Fox has no music pub- 
lishing subsidiary. The firms of Bregman, 
Vocco and Conn; Robbins, and Mills and Tri- 
angle publish most of the company's music. 

The company's "Coney Island" made popular 
the musical number "There's Danger in a 
Dance," "Goin' to the County Fair" and "My 
Heart Tells Me," were both made popular as 
result of "Sweet Rosie O'Grady." "The Gang's 
All Here" made popular two numbers, "No 
-ove, No Nothin'" and "The Polka Dot 
Polka." Currently "You're My Little Pin Up 
Girl" and "Time Alone Will Tell," musical 
n'ghlights in the film "Pin Up Girl," are get- 
:ine public attention. 

Not all of the film companies have tieups 



with publishers. Columbia has none, but has 
had considerable success of late with song hits, 
two numbers in particular having scored with 
top honors on the Hit Parade over periods of 
weeks. "It's Love, Love, Love" from "Stars 
on Parade," is the most recent of the Hit Pa- 
rade leaders. "Long Ago and Far Away" was 
heard recently in "Cover Girl," in fact still is 
being heard in the picture, and has never been 
far away from the top of the Parade, and for 
a considerable period was on top. Another 
Columbia hit song was "Shoo Shoo Baby" 
from "Beautiful But Broke." 

Three Publishers Handle 
Music from RKO Films 

RKO has had most of its musical numbers 
published and plugged by three publishers, 
Shappell and Harms, Robbins, Miller Company 
and Southern Music Company. The company's 
recent musical "Higher and Higher" was the 
origin of two numbers that have become 
familiar titles in the first ten of the Hit 
Parade, "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" 
and "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening." 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer owns the music pub- 
lishing company of Leo Feist, Inc. Their ex- 
ploitation methods are directed almost entirely 
at radio, including local stations as well as net- 
works. MGM's "I Dood It" made "Star Eyes" 
popular. With "Milk Man Keep Those Bottles 
Quiet" from "Broadway Rhythm," the reverse 
is probably true. Feist is currently at work 
plugging "In Times Like These" which will 
be heard in the forthcoming MGM release, 
"Meet the People." 

The first two numbers have been among the 
Parade's first 10, but "In Times Like These" 
is still in the exploitation stages and has yet to 
meet its test. It may become popular before 
the picture is released and help popularize the 
film, or it may not gain popularity until after 
the release of "Meet the People." And then 
again it may never be popular. Time will tell. 
The number presents a good opportunity to 
study the exploitation of a song prior to its 
screen appearance, and the eventual results. 

Universal Song Numbers 
Highly Successful 

Universal is another film company without 
publishing affiliations or tieups. Numbers from 
two of their films have gained a wide following, 
"Are You?" from "Weekend Pass" and "The 
House I Live In," the song hit of "Follow the 
Boys." 

Paramount wholly owns two publishers, Fa- 
mous Music Corporation and Paramount Music 
Corporation. The biggest of their most recent 
musical hits was "Sunday, Monday or Always," 
heard in the picture "Dixie" and one-time lead- 
er of the Hit Parade. "Suddenly It's Spring" 
was written especially for the screen version 
of "Lady in the Dark," and has gained a popu- 
lar following. "Going My Way" has produced 
two popular numbers, the title song and 
"Swinging on a Star." A song that has been 
reported gaining in popularity but is still short 
of making the Parade list is "It Could Happen 
to You" from the current release, "And the 
Angels Sing." 

Republic, without publisher affiliation, has a 
policy of harnessing music with a double duty. 
Popular songs for this company are not there 
only to entertain but to publicize as well. Re- 
public was the first to make a habit of picking 



a song hit, planting it in the film, and in some 
cases building the picture around the music, 
and giving the picture the song's title, such 
as "Pistol Packin' Mama." Other Republic ex- 
amples in this category are "Rosie the Riveter," 
"Three Little Sisters," "San Fernando Valley." 
In each case the story was built around a song 
title already made popular by music publishers. 

In October, 1942, Republic's "Youth on Pa- 
rade" produced a Hit Parade number, "I've 
Heard That Song Before." And last year they 
released a film called "Hit Parade of 1943" and 
came up with a song hit, "Change of Heart." 



Stage Shows Hit 
New Midwest Low 
This Summer 

The Midwest, once one of the most productive 
markets for stage shows, will see a new low this 
summer in the number of theatres operating with 
combination policies. The chief reasons, following 
a check-up among operators buying stage attrac- 
tions, include the scarcity of box office bands or 
vaudeville unit shows and the improved screen 
product which holds up quite well on its own. 

The most conspicuous development in the com- 
bination field* recently was the decision of Balaban 
and Katz not to play the top band units in the 
Chicago theatre this season because of the percent- 
age deals demanded by the booking offices. The 
Chicago is now playing revues primarily and the 
grosses have been as good and in some cases better 
than during the same period last year when the 
screen bills were augmented by top name bands. 

This summer, the independent Oriental in Chi- 
cago is playing all top name bands, offering them 
50 per cent of the gross. Because the Oriental de- 
pends almost entirely on the draw of the stage 
shows, it has found it practical to attract these 
box office shows with 50-50 terms. Among bands 
given such deals include Tommy Dorsey, Xavier 
Cugat, the combination of the Andrews Sisters 
and Mitch Ayres' band, Guy Lombardo, and Hor- 
ace Heidt. 

Warners has eliminated stage shows from the 
Paramount in Hammond, Ind., which for years 
played a band or vaudeville unit at least one day 
a week. Sam Roberts and Nicholas Boila, oper- 
ators of Keith's, Indianapolis, closed that house 
last week for the summer. Keith's played stage 
shows Thursday through Sunday. 

Both the Standard Theatres Company and the 
Great States Theatres, operating in Illinois, Indi- 
ana and Wisconsin, have had fewer stage shows 
this year than in recent years. This condition is 
also true of the Mort H. Singer Theatres which 
no longer run regular stage bills in the Orpheum 
theatres in Omaha and Indianapolis. 

Only houses in the Midwest to continue with 
stage shows through the summer are the Chicago 
and Oriental, Chicago; Stratford, Chicago (Satur- 
days and Sundays) ; Riverside, Milwaukee ; Pal- 
ace, Rockford, 111. (Fridays through Sundays) ; 
Bijou, Battle Creek, Mich. ; Englewood, Chicago 
(Thursdays through Sundays), and the St. 
Charles, St. Charles, 111. (Sundays). 

"Snow White" in Final Week 
At Manhattan Theatre 

"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" started 
the thirteenth and final week of its Broadway run 
at the Manhattan theatre June 27. The Walt Dis- 
ney cartoon feature will be followed by the same 
producer's "Fantasia." 



OTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



17 



„ , _ & New Ticket Tax Seen Doubling 

Dubbed Product n £ A 

Revenue from Amusements 



For Europe 

More than 50 films have been dubbed into 
French and Italian by five major companies in the 
last year and a half and the overseas film division 
of the Office of War Information is trying to ar- 
range with the companies for release of two pic- 
tures each for OWI distribution abroad as soon as 
France and other European countries are freed, 

Robert Riskin, director of the overseas film unit 
of OWK, said in New York Monday that several 
distributors had "promised" two pictures each, 
dubbed in French and Italian, for the OWL A 
home office foreign department executive, how- 
ever, said that several of the companies "had not 
yet agreed to the plan." He indicated that some 
distributors were reluctant to turn over dubbed 
films to the OWI and would prefer to wait until 
the military situation in Europe permitted dis- 
tribution through their own channels abroad. 

40 Titled Pictures Available 

The dubbed versions, if released to OWI, would 
be in addition to the 40 super-imposed titles which 
all the film companies made available nearly two 
years ago. Warner Bros, leads in dubbing with 
18 pictures in French and about 10 in Italian. 
MGM has five in French and six in Italian; Uni- 
versal, five in French; Columbia eight in French 
and Italian ; Twentieth Century-Fox one in French 
and others in preparation. Paramount, RKO and 
United Artists, according to home office execu- 
tives, have been waiting to see how the situation 
develops before going ahead with their dubbing. 

A partial list of the dubbed versions includes : 

Warner Bros. : "Princess O'Rourke," "The Mal- 
tese Falcon," "Sergeant York," "Yankee Doodle 
Dandy," "Air Force," "Strawberry Blonde," "The 
Great Lie," "All This and Heaven, Too," "Always 
in My Heart," "They Drive By Night," "Virginia 
City," "Till We Meet Again," "Sea Wolf," "The 
Sea Hawk," in French. "Sergeant York," "Sea 
Hawk" and "Yankee Doodle Dandy," in Italian. 

Universal: "It Started With Eve," "Destry 
Rides Again," both of which probably will be made 
available to the OWI; "Phantom of the Opera," 
"Back Street" and "Flesh and Fantasy," in French. 
"Shadow of a Doubt," "Appointment for Love," 
Italian. 

Columbia : "Cover Girl," "Sahara," "Adam Had 
Four Sons," "This Thing Called Love," "The 
Desperadoes," "You Belong to Me," "The Lady 
Is Willing" and "Men in Her Life," in French. 

MGM : "The Ziegfeld Girl," "Shop Around the 
Corner," among others. 

Kastner, Lawrence in France 

Mr. Riskin indicated that Lacy Kastner and 
Laudy Lawrence, former industry executives who 
have been overseas for the OWI during the past 
year, were now in France with the invasion armies. 
He said that both had been due to go immediately 
after D-Day. Mr. Kastner heads OWI operations 
for liberated Europe and Mr. Lawrence has charge 
of the North African, Mediterranean and Middle 
East territories. Mr. Riskin and Major Arthur 
Loew, newly assigned by the Army to act as as- 
sistant to the OWI film head, probably will leave 
the U. S. shortly for a trip to the liberated French 
areas to survey OWI and Army Psychological 
Warfare Board motion picture activities. 

The OWI overseas film division will make 26 
shorts this year, Mr. Riskin said, in one and two 
reels, four more than were produced for the last 
fiscal year. In addition, 12 two-reel subjects are 
being produced in Hollywood with the cooperation 
of the studios, at the request of the OWI. Scripts 
are being prepared by the Writers Mobilization 
Board under supervision of a committee of three, 
Allan Scott, Emmet Lavery and Robert Rossen. 
The films will deal principally with propagandizing' 
the democratic way of life, Mr. Riskin said. 



Nimitz Honors Hayward 

Captain Louis Hayward, screen star and Marine 
officer, was awarded the Star Medal this week for 
his work in filming the battle of Tarawa. Ad- 
miral Chester W. Nimitz made the citation. 



Washington Bureau 

Initial collections under the one-cent-on-five 
Federal admission tax, effective last April I , 
indicate that the new levy, plus improving 
business, will practically double the U. S. 
Treasury's collections from the motion pic- 
ture and amusement industries, it was dis- 
closed in Washington this week. 

A total of $28,617,079 was collected by 
the Government from theatres in May, the 
first month in which the new tax was reflected 
in Treasury receipts, based on the public's 
April box office payments, and compared 
with $14,907,919 in April payments to the 
U.S., and $14,625,615 in May, 1943. 

While some part of the increase in April 
collections is from the opening of the national 
baseball season, the proportionate gain from 
that source this year was not as large as 
in previous seasons because bad weather 
caused postponement of many ball games. 



Columbia Registers New 
Securities with SEC 

Columbia registered with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission in Philadelphia Monday 7,880 
shares of no par value common stock and 7,880 
purchase warrants for one share each of no par 
value of common stock. The proposed public of- 
fering price for the common stock is $20, for the 
purchase warrants, $10. Net proceeds, estimated 
at $58,830, would be used as additional working 
capital, the company said. A. Montague, general 
sales manager, was named underwriter. 

Lesieur Promotion Head 
Of United Artists 

Howard R. Lesieur has been appointed sales 
promotion manager of United Artists, it was an- 
nounced last week. His relinquished post as pro- 
duction manager will be assumed by Nathan Lax, 
formerly of the Sterling Advertising Agency. Be- 
fore joining United Artists, Mr. Lesieur was con- 
nected with Hanff-Metzger advertising agency, 
as contact on the Paramount Pictures account. 

Authorized Film Trucks 
Found Not Suitable 

Certificates of authorization to purchase seven-ton 
trucks, obtained for the New York film truckers 
from the War Production Board apparently does 
not solve the truckers' delivery problems. _A 
spokesman for the New York State Film Deliv- 
ery Service declared that the trucks authorized 
were of the low-gear type and were not suitable. 
Another effort will be made to obtain the larger 
trucks, it was said. 

MGM Branch Managers 
To Visit New York 

MGM branch managers again will make visits 
to the home office at the rate of two a week. Each 
will spend a week getting acquainted with innova- 
tions and ideas. According to present plans, the 
managers will begin arriving July 10, with Sam 
Gardner, of Salt Lake City, and Lou Amacher of 
Portland, Ore., the first scheduled. 

Libel Suits Dismissed 

Three libel suits totaling $600,000 in damages 
sought, brought against RKO Pictures, Inc., by 
Mrs. Minna Wright of Fall River, Mass., and her 
son and daughter, were dismissed in Federal 
Court, Boston. 



With the heavy May receipts, the Revenue 
Bureau announced, collections for the first 
I I months of the Government's fiscal year of 
1943-44 reached $179,048,830, an increase 
of $35,707,584 over the $143,341,246 re- 
corded for the same period a year ago, 
while for the first five months of the calendar 
year the revenue amounted to $87,257,126, 
an increase of $24,428,130 over the $62,- 
828,996 reported for 1943. 

The higher tax resulted in nearly doubling 
the revenue from the third New York (Broad- 
way) district, where collections increased from 
$2,228,332 in April to $4,360,450 last month. 
Revenue from the district in May, 1943, was 
$1,856,159. 

All of the increase was in collections at 
the box office, which jumped from $1,964,280 
to $3,755,806, and in admissions to roof gar- 
dens and cabarets, which increased from 
$204,084 to $575,151. 



Master Dismisses 
J. H. Cooper Suit 

Francis W. H. Adams, special master appoints 
by Federal Judge Murray Hulbert last year t 
conduct hearings on the suit filed in 1933 by Para 
mount against Joseph H. Cooper, Rialto, Inc., In 
terstate Theatres, Inc., and J. H. Cooper Enter 
prises, Inc., of Colorado, recommended in a reporj 
to Federal court Tuesday in New York that th 
suit be dismissed for lack of jurisdictional ev : 
dence. 

Mr. Adams' report, based on a defense motio! 
for an order vacating the alleged service of til 
summons and complaint, indicated that while M 
Cooper transacted considerable business in Ne ' 
York City, Paramount had been unable to sho | 
sufficient facts to warrant the claim that the d< 
fendants were jurisdictional residents of New Yoi 
State. 

The action involved alleged breach of contra 
and Paramount sought to enjoin Mr. Cooper frol 
transferring ownership of stock in the three cor! 
panies. In 1933, Paramount filed suit, allegii 
that Mr. Cooper was to reorganize his theatre i ! 
terests in Colorado which were owned by Publij 
Theatre Corporation and also to form a holdia J 
company in which Paramount and the defendaj n 
were to be 50-50 owners. 



Billings Named Editorial 
Director of Time, Inc. 

Effective July 10 John Shaw Billings, 46, mal 
aging editor of Life Magazine, will become el 
torial director of the Time-Life-Fortune public! 
tions, including the March of Time on the scref 
and on the air, it has been announced by Herf 
R. Luce, editor-in-chief. Daniel Longwell, exe< • 
tive editor of Life, will succeed Mr. Billings '<;■ 
managing editor on the same date. When 
March of Time cinema was founded in 1934, J;, 
Longwell became its promotion manager. 



RKO Declares Dividend 

At a meeting of the board of directors of Ratr 
Keith- Orpheum Corporation in New York W i 
nesday, all officers were reelected for the conjs 
year and a dividend of $1.50 per share on the p 
per cent preferred stock of the corporation 1 
declared. The dividend is payable August 1, w 
to stockholders of record July 20, 1944, constat 
ing the regular dividend for the current quarte j 



18 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY !, 1 1 






J 



Mac Arthur Has GI 
Film Taste, Staff 
Officer Reports 

General Douglas MacArthur, commanding Allied 
ground troops .in the South Pacific, is a film fan, 
and he likes the same fare the "G.I." likes. The 
report of the General's tastes came from Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Joseph R. McMicking, of the General's 
staff, during an address on the National Broad- 
casting Company "Army Hour" Sunday evening, 
luring which Colonel McMicking, in Hollywood, 
presented three "Fuzzy-Wuzzies," native tribal 
emblems, to the winners of a poll conducted among 
troops in the General's command, for the "bests" 
among actresses, actors and pictures. 

The awards went to Greer Garson, in the first 
category, Humphrey Bogart, as the best actor ; 
and to Jack L. Warner, for producing the best 
picture, "Casablanca." 

Colonel McMicking said of General MacArthur 
that he believes films are the best entertainment, 
even as do his men, and that the awards represent 
a desire in the South Pacific to express the belief 
in a forthright manner, and that the "Fuzzy Wuz- 
zies" are the South Pacific's "Oscars." The Colonel 
added the film shows meant to the soldiers six 
hours a week in their home back-yard; that the 
average attendance per show was 3,000; that some 
shows were within 50 yards of the front — and that 
even Japs had been found, and captured, watching 
them. 

Paul Hunter Consolidates 
Liberty Film Magazines 

Liberty Magazine, Inc., has purchased three 
screen magazines, Screenland, Silver Screen and 
Movie Show, from Hunter Publications, Inc. 

With this move the several publishing interests 
directed by Paul Hunter are brought under one 
corporation. Prior to August, 1942, when Mr. 
Hunter became president of Liberty, he was the 
publisher of the three screen magazines which 
Liberty Magazine, Inc., has now purchased. 

Mr. Hunter continues as president and publisher. 
He owns the entire capital stock of Liberty Maga- 
zine, Inc. 

Edward Maher, vice-president and editor, be- 
comes editorial director of the corporation. Homer 
Rockwell, hitherto vice-president of Hunter Publi- 
cations, Inc., becomes a Liberty vice-president and 
advertising director. 

Warners to Purchase 
Schlesinger Studio 

Under the terms of a sale now in its final stages, 
Warners will acquire the Leon Schlesinger car- 
toon studio to operate as a direct subsidiary, ef- 
fective July 1. The purchase includes all of Mr. 
Schlesinger's film properties and rights, but ex- 
cludes his by-products business consisting of car- 
toon strips, books, etc., to which he will devote his 
future activities. 

/ 

Wingart Rejoins 20+h-Fox 

Earl Wingart has rejoined Twentieth Century- 
Fox to head a special service division of the ex- 
ploitation department under Rodney Bush, exploi- 
tation manager, it was announced this week by 
Hal Home, director of advertising and publicity. 
For the past two years Mr. Wingart has been 
with the eastern division of the Public Informa- 
tion Committee of the motion picture industry, 
prior to which he was publicity manager of Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox. 



John Stuart Joins OWI 

| John Stuart, Jr., has resigned from the editorial 
staff of Motion Picture Herald to join the over- 
seas branch of the Office of War Information as 
' E July 1. He was married June 25 to Ruth E. 
Sherman of Flushing, L. I. Mr. Stuart and his 
bride are spending their honeymoon at Nantucket 
Island, Cape Cod. He came to Quigley Publica- 
tions in January, 1941, from the Philadelphia 
Evening Public Ledger. 



Three Features Open 
At Broadway Houses 

"Christmas Holiday," starring Deanna Durbin 
and Gene Kelly, had its premiere at the Criterion 
theatre in New York on Tuesday ; "Once Upon a 
Time," co-starring Cary Grant and Janet Blair, 
opened at the Radio City Music Hall Thursday, 
and Saturday "The Hairy Ape" was scheduled to 
have its New York premiere at the Globe theatre. 

Wednesday night, eve of the opening of "Christ- 
mas Holiday," 12 radio stations had 15-minute pro- 
grams, relating the rise of Deanna Durbin, trac- 
ing her film experiences from her first screen ap- 
pearance in 1937 to her current release. 

During the early part of July the Jules Levey 
production, "The Hairy Ape," distributed by Unit- 
ed Artists, and starring William Bendix and Su- 
san Hayward, will open in 22 key Loew theatres 
throughout the country, the first July 6. 



Goldwyn Obtains 
Release Rights 

"The Way Ahead," a Two Cities Films British 
production, for which Samuel Goldwyn has distri- 
bution rights in all territories outside the British 
Empire, will arrive in New York next week by 
Clipper. 

Mr. Goldwyn is expected in New York for the 
preview, which will be attended by the trade press, 
and be followed by an early release, according to 
the Goldwyn New York office. 

The picture, which stars David Niven and re- 
ceived good British press notices following its 
London world premiere, is one of several whose 
distribution was seen as a prize for either Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox, under its world-wide agree- 
ment with Arthur Rank, principal owner of Two 
Cities ; Eagle-Lion, Mr. Rank's own distributing 
unit, or Mr. Goldwyn, who several years ago 
made a contract with Two Cities. The contract 
provided an option on the picture to aid realiza- 
tion of his blocked sterling balances at a time 
when currency exports were regulated strictly by 
the British Treasury. Part of the Goldwyn blocked 
sterling was made available to Two Cities,' in re- 
turn for distribution options on several pictures, 
of which "The Way Ahead" is one. 

Mr. Goldwyn at present has a distributing con- 
tract with RKO Radio Pictures. 

F. & M. Plans New 
St. Louis Theatre 

Plans for the construction of a 2,206-seat mo- 
tion picture theater at Hamilton Avenue and 
Chippewa Street in Southwest St. Louis after the 
war have been announced by Harry C. Arthur, 
Jr., general manager of Fanchon & Marco. The 
theater will be built in the center of a two-acre 
site owned by Sam Komm, owner of the Komm 
chain of neighborhood theaters and will be opera- 
ted under a long term lease by the Missouri 
Amusement Corporation, a subsidiary of Fanchon 
& Marco. Komm will erect the building. 

The theater will be, named the Hampton Theater, 
The first draft architectural drawings provide for 
ample parking space for patrons' cars on the site. 

Plans for similar neighborhoor theater expan^ 
sion and rehabilitation are now being made and 
will be announced as soon as the negotiations for 
the sites have been completed. 



Graetz Back from Hollywood 

Paul Graetz, president of the A. F. E. Corpora- 
tion, has returned to New York after a trip to 
Hollywood, where he completed a deal with Ray 
Lewis for the reissue in the U. S. of three David 
O. Selznick productions, "Garden of Allah," "Tom 
Sawyer" and "The Prisoner of Zenda." 



Plan Dinner for Ruff 

Edward G. Ruff, manager of the Paramount 
exchange in New Haven for the past seven years, 
now promoted to Boston, will be honored at a 
dinner party July 10, tentatively set at Oakdale 
Tavern. Mr. Ruff has been succeeded by John 
Moore, former sales manager at Boston. 



Universal Sets 
Release Dates 
To December 

W. A. Scully, vice-president and general sales 
manager of Universal, this week announced new 
season release dates running through November 
24. Among the highlights of the schedule will be 
the Technicolor production, "Gypsy Wildcat," 
starring Maria Montez, Jon Hall and Peter Coe, 
released September 1 ; "The Merry Monahans," 
starring Donald O'Connor, Peggy Ryan and Jack 
Oakie, September 15 ; and the all-star musical, 
"Bowery to Broadway," November 3. 

The schedule of releases for the first quarter 
follows : 

September 1, "Gypsy Wildcat" ; September 9, 
"Moonlight and Cactus," with the Andrews Sis- 
ters, Leo Carillo, Elyse Knox, and Mitch Ayres 
and his orchestra ; September 15, "The Merry 
Monahans"; September 22, "Pearl of Death," 
Sherlock Holmes story, starring Basil Rathbone 
and Nigel Bruce ; September 29, "San Diego, I 
Love You," produced by Michael Fessier and 
Ernest Pagano, and co-starring Louise Allbritton 
and Jon Hall. 

October 6, ''The Singing Sheriff," starring Bob 
Crosby; October 13, "See My Lawyer," starring 
Olsen and Johnson with Grace McDonald, Alan 
Curtis, Noah Beery, Jr.; October 20, "The Cli- 
max," a Technicolor production starring Susanna 
Foster, Boris Karloff and Turhan Bey ; October 
27, "Babes on Swing Street," starring Peggy Ry- 
an, Ann Blyth and Leon Errol. 

November 3, "Bowery to Broadway" ; Novem- 
ber 10, the Inner Sanctum story, "Dead Man's 
Eyes," starring Lon Chaney, with Jean Parker, 
Paul Kelly and Thomas Gomez; November 17, 
"Reckless Age," starring Gloria Jean ; November 
24, "The Suspect," starring Charles Laughton and 
Ella' Raines. 

All films are completed and ready for release 
with the exception of "The Suspect," which is now 
in preparation. 

National Carbon Installs 
New Sales Arrangement 

A New sales setup under which all company 
products will be handled nationally from seven 
divisional offices is being installed by National 
Carbon Company, Inc., it is announced. Four of 
the new offices are in operation and the others will 
be added by October 1. All sales activities in the 
Southeast have been consolidated under a new 
Atlanta division office, with J. F. Warnell as divi- 
sion manager. C. C. Joslyn is manager of the 
new Dallas division. At Kansas City, A. C. Bryan 
has taken over as division manager. On the west 
coast, R. P. Tolles assumes the direction of the 
new Pacific Coast division. The three division 
offices yet to be opened will be in Chicago, Pitts- 
burgh and New York. 

Cagney Film Scheduled 
For Foreign Openings 

After strong business in England, "Johnny Come 

Lately," first feature from William Cagney Pro- 
ductions, now is opening in other foreign terri- 
tories, through distribution by United Artists. This 
first James Cagney vehicle now is playing extend- 
ed runs in the English Provinces, Ireland, Scot- 
land, Wales, Sweden and the Panama Canal Zone. 
"Johnny Come Lately" is scheduled to open this 
month or has been sold for July release in the 
following countries : Australia, Argentina, Brazil, 
Cuba, India, Peru, Mexico, and a deal is now 
pending for a premiere in Colombia. 

Comment on "Purple Heart" 
Compiled into Brochure 

A brochure containing the press comment on 
Darryl F. Zanuck's "The Purple Heart" has been 
prepared bv the publicity department of Twentieth 
Century-Fox and is being sent to exhibitors all 
over the country who have not shown the film. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



2? 



British Council Delays 
Report on Monopoly 



Council Term to Expire in 
August; Data Awaited to 
Still Industry Debate 

by PETER BURNUP 
in London 

Despite the wish of the Board of Trade's 
president, Hugh Dalton, that the British Film 
Council's committee of inquiry press on with 
its report concerning the potentialities of in- 
dustry monopoly, no sign of the long-awaited 
recommendations can be discerned. 

Sir Walter Citrine, general secretary of the 
Trades Unions Congress and one of the com- 
mittee's most significant members, returned re- 
cently from his deliberations in Washington on 
international labor problems. Philip Guedalla, 
widely regarded as the committee's moving 
spirit, has been ill. The term of office of the 
present council expires in August; its mem- 
bers, in accordance with the Quota Act, being 
appointed for three years only. Maybe the in- 
vestigators will move now with more expedi- 
tion and announce their findings before the new 
council takes over. It is hoped in many quar- 
ters that may be so, for the debates on monop- 
oly threaten to get out of hand. 

Conform Clearly to Pattern 

These excessively vocal activities grow in 
volume ; conform clearly to a pattern of- attack 
which is being prepared for Parliament when 
debates are initiated on the present Quota Act's 
successor. They are compounded mainly of 
earnest argument, partly of irresponsible, ill- 
natured sneers, partly of superior attitudiniz- 
ing. 

Characteristic of the last is a vehement at- 
tack on J. Arthur Rank — inevitably the ac- 
knowledged target of all the agitators' shafts — 
appearing in a publication known as Docu- 
mentary News Letter. This is ostensibly the 
organ of the country's documentary film mak- 
ers. The invective was produced in comment 
on Mr. Rank's post-war plans for utilizing the 
cinema for the advancement of the nation's 
educational system. 

Speaking of the manifest potentialities of the 
place of film in education, News Letter con- 
cedes that Mr. Rank clearly has a plan. But 
the publication is concerned not so much with 
the spiritual aspect of Mr. Rank's activities or 
with the objective nature of his educational 
aims, but only with their economic implica- 
tions. 

Scores Rank's Views 

Says News Letter: "To predict its (the edu- 
cational plan's) economic basis we must con- 
sider Mr. Rank as a millionaire and an amateur 
economist ; to predict the content of his educa- 
tional films we must consider him as a million- 
aire, a Methodist and an amateur politician. 
. . . Mr. Rank has a nostalgia for orthodox mid- 
nineteenth century economics. He believes in 
unbridled private enterprise under the sole sur- 
veillance of God." 

That bugbear of monopoly, it is to be ob- 
served, is the cornerstone of the documen- 
tarians' preoccupations, just as it is of all the 
other sections of the Industry's workers who 
aim at ruling its roost. 

The suggestion of a sinister politico-eco- 
nomic design behind all the planning of Mr. 

26 



Rank and his associates is a common factor in 
all the welter of pamphlets and speeches which 
constitute the preliminary barrage of the im- 
pending Parliamentary attack. It motivates, 
for example, the elaborate post-war plan pro- 
posed by the Association of Cine-Technicians 
leading to public ownership of the industry. 

The ACT's plan was put forward once again 
recently at the London Trades Council annual 
conference, was the occasion there of enthu- 
siastic approval, and is clearly in line for early 
discussion by the Shadow Cabinet of the Labor 
Party as a preliminary to adoption, in some 
form or other, as part of the party's vast pro- 
gram for post-war political control. 

Writer Group Has Committee 

Come now the thoughts on the subject of the 
non-trade union but closely corporate body of 
the Screenwriters' Association. The associa- 
tion, not to be left out, set up a committee to 
ascertain once more the reasons for the alleged 
non-distribution of British films in the United 
States. The committee has produced a lengthy 
document which has been circulated among 
Members of Parliament, Government depart- 
ments and other circles. It takes the form of 
an involved analysis of wartime conditions; 
postulates that those conditions will rapidly 
come to an end; dilates on the circumstances 
that America takes annually from this country 
some £18,000,000 in respect of film hire, 
whereas eight years ago the comparable figure 
was £7,000,000. 

Most interesting feature of the association's 
case is the conclusion that the Quota System 
is one of the bugbears of the present setup, 
depending, primarily, as it does, on distribution 
in this country through the medium of the 
American companies. The association claims 
that there will be no solution of the problems of 
world-marketing of British films until the 
American companies concede them what the 
association characterizes as "equitable distribu- 
tion in the American market." 

Have Own Remedies 

The Screenwriters have their own specifics 
for the ills of the industry. 
They suggest: 

(1) Stronger protection of the home market 
than the present quota system allows. This 
should make it possible under post-war condi- 
tions for medium-cost films, the forcing ground 
for talent and the essential basis of a healthy 
industry, to make a profit in the home market 
alone. 

(2) A Film Bank to finance independent 
British producers. 

(3) A Cooperative Distributing Organiza- 
tion, with State support (through the medium, 
say, of the Film Bank) for the distribution of 
independent British productions in the world 
market, and, where desired, in the home 
market. 

Analyzed, the Screenwriters' plan follows 
closely that of the ACT and other groups. 

State ownership of motion picture affairs 
may seem remote to people who, as the critics 
declare, still live in a world of mid-Victorian 
economics. That some measure of control, con- 
siderably more severe than that now obtaining, 
will presently come into being is the firm belief 
of many forward-looking legislators even in 
the present Parliament. 

That State Film Bank, suggested beachhead 



for the nationalizes' advance, is being wideh, 
discussed. It was mooted as long ago as 1936 
when the drafting of the present Quota Act wa: 
argued. What was known as the Moyne Com 
mittee, appointed to advise the Government or 
the preliminaries to the Act, specifically recom 
mended that the State should encourage th< 
formation of financial organizations to financf 
approved British production units. It was no 
adopted but the persistent advocacy of the ide; 
merits careful attention. It will assuredly read 
the stage of Parliamentary ventilation ere long 



N. /. Allied Hears 
Distributors 

The assembled members of the Allied Theatr 
Owners of New Jersey, meeting in their Silve 
Jubilee convention at the Hotel Chelsea in Atlar 
tic City, ended three days of business and soci; 
sessions Thursday of last week, in a discussion ( 
product shortage and participation in the currei i 
War Loan, and a banquet. 

The final business session was held in the aftei 
noon with distributor representatives addressir 
the exhibitors. Leon Bamberger appeared in tl 
dual role of representative of RKO and the Wi 
Activities Committee. He said that New Jers< J 
had fallen behind other areas in scheduling W; j 
Bond premieres, and announced that throughoi 
the nation 3,831 premieres had been set. 

The distributor representatives all outlined the 
companies' plans and described forthcoming at | 
current product and exploitation programs. l\ 
the conclusion of the meeting Harry Lowenstei 'j 
Jersey Allied president, called the convention aJ 
journed. 

Twentieth Century-Fox was host at a cockt; : 
party, while MGM lit 20 candles on a cake in hon \ 
of its anniversary. 

At the banquet following the cocktail party t 
diners were greeted by Mayor Joseph Altaian 
Atlantic City. Sidney Samuelson reviewed Je | 
sey Allied's 20 years. Claude Lee spoke as t 
industry's consultant to the U. S. Treasury in t 
Bond drive and brought the campaign's results 
to date. 

Life membership certificates . in Jersey Alii 
were presented to Mr. Samuelson and P. S. Har 
son, and wallets to Abram Myers, Irving Dolli 
ger, George Gold, Lee Newbury, Joseph Seid 
and Leon Rosenblatt. All but Mr. Myers, who 
the national Allied general counsel, are past pre) i 
dents of the Jersey organization. 

Also revealed late Thursday was an addition 
the resolutions adopted at the convention, one c , 
posing sales of pictures on percentage terms a » 
demanding flat rentals on all pictures. The re: 
lution authorized a fund-raising move to obtain \ j , 
objectives named by legal processes should nejl I 
tiations fail. 

Vanguard Heads Discuss 
"Since You Went Away" 

Vanguard executives met in Chicago Mond 
to discuss sales plans for "Since You W 
Away." Those in conference were David ! 
Selznick, Neil F. Agnew, vice-president and (j 
tribution head, and Hugh Owen, general se 
manager for the United States and Canada. 

Mr. Selznick, producer of "Since You W 1 
Away," is a delegate to another sales conventi| 
the Republican National Convention. The f 1 
print of the picture arrived in New York 1 ji 
week. 

The Chicago conferences are expected to 
elude final arrangements for the New York n 
miere of the film at the Capitol theatre July I 
and the discussion of appointments of sales ret 
sentatives for Vanguard in Chicago and the 'Wf 
Coast. 

Special Paramount Common 
Stock Offering Sold 

A special offering of 52,800 shares of Paramcii % 
Pictures common stock was sold on the New Yjl L - 
Stock Exchange last week by Merrill, Lyi I 
Pierce, Fenner and Beane. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, \ \ 

I 



u 



THANKS! 



11 



The Twenty Year Birthday of the Friendly Lion is being 
observed with fitting ceremonies throughout the nation. An 
unprecedented tribute was paid to M-G-M during its Anni- 
versary Week. 16,446 showmen representing 99.98% of the nation's 




motion picture theatres — all but three! —played an M-G-M subject 
on their screens. Likewise throughout the world this famed trade-mark 
was flashed on thousands of screens in recognition of M-G-M's Twenty 
Happy Years of sincere effort toward the welfare of our industry. 

To the exhibitors who made it possible, thanks from the grateful 
heart of Leo the Lion and his associates. To the trade press and to 
the newspaper and magazine editors 
who helped him celebrate, thanks for 
all the kind words. 

Your generosity and your faith in- 
spires The Friendly Company to the 
even greater future which we share 
together. 

THE YOUNG 
BLOOD TEST! 




ANNIVERSARY 
PRODUCTIONS 




"He's even 
better than 
he was 
twenty 
years agol" 



"WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER" (Irene Dunne, 
Alan Marshal) • "AN AMERICAN 
ROMANCE" — Technicolor — (Brian Donlevy) 
"DRAGON SEED" • (Katharine Hepburn) 
"TWO GIRLS AND A SAILOR" (Van Johnson, 
June Allyson, Gloria DeHaven,Jose Iturbi, Jimmy 
Durante, Harry James, Xavier Cugat) • "BATH- 
ING BEAUTY" — Technicolor — (Red Skelton, 
Esther Williams, Harry James, Xavier Cugat) 
"KISMET" — Technicolor - (Ronald Colman, 
Marlene Dietrich) • "MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS" 
— Technicolor — (Judy Garland, Margaret 
O'Brien) • "MARRIAGE IS A PRIVATE 
AFFAIR" (Lana Turner) • "THE SEVENTH 
CROSS" (Spencer Tracy) • "NATIONAL 
VELVET" — Technicolor — (Mickey Rooney) 
"THE CANTERVILLE GHOST" (Margaret 
O'Brien, Charles Laughton, Robert Young) 
"ZIEGFELD FOLLIES" — Technicolor — (All Star 
Cast) • "THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO" 
(Van Johnson, Robert Walker, and Spencer Tracy 
as Lieutenant General James H. Doolittle) 
"MRS. PARKINGTON" (Greer Garson— Walter 
Pidgeon) • "WITHOUT LOVE" (SpencerTracy— 
Katharine Hepburn) • "THE THIN MAN 
GOES HOME" (William Powell— Myrna hoy) 
"LOST IN A HAREM" (Bud Abbott— Lou 
Costello) • "THE PICTURE OF DORIAN 
GRAY" (George Sanders, Donna Reed) • "THE 
HONEST THIEF" (Wallace Beery) 



Every Theater: Free Movie Day, July 6th! "The Fighting Fifth" Victory Climax! 



Rank Will Make Story Su pp*y Service f 
Of Mary Magdalene 



Expanded by RCA \) 



Del Giudice Is Producer; 
Leader Plans Version of 
'Pilgrim's Progress" 



London Bureau 

Long known as a subject near to his heart, 
and one whose merits he has often commended, 
J. Arthur Rank's "Mary Magdalene" seems 
now to be approaching production stage. Mr. 
Rank's pre-occupation with sacred themes is 
well known. Long before he created his pres- 
ent organization he financed a little film — it 
was his first known association with the motion 
picture — called "Thy Words Were a Lamp 
Unto My Feet." 

The film, amateurishly made, was produced 
by the Religious Film Society. It told the story 
of a last-war prisoner, escaping from a Tur- 
kish prison camp, making his way across the 
Holy Land guided only by the names of vil- 
lages recorded in the Old Testament. The 
Rank advisers, acknowledging the dramatic 
potentialities of the story of the Woman of 
Magdala, had forebodings of reactions in re- 
ligious circles. 

Rank Persisted in Plan 

Mr. Rank persisted, however, arguing that 
such ventures, for example, as the Passion 
Play at Ober-Ammergau, was ample justifica- 
tion of his belief. Several authors were set 
to the job of producing provisional treatments 
of the story, but none developed satisfactorily. 

Under the scheme devised by the British 
Film Producers' Association on prospective 
film subjects, the title "Mary Magdalene" was 
registered a year ago in behalf of Gabriel 
Pascal. 

The association maintains three separate 
tables of registration : original titles, copyright 
titles, titles in public domain. The "Magdalen" 
film fell into the last, but it appears that not Mr. 
Pascal but Filippo del Giudice's Two Cities 
organization presently will undertake to make 
the sacred subject. 

Mr. Del Giudice lately has been in continual 
conference with Clemence Dane, famed novel- 
ist, dramatist and scenarist, in regard to the 
"Magdalen" film. Miss Dane is currently en- 
gaged on a treatment of the story whose out- 
lines at least commend themselves not only to 
Mr. Rank but to other persons of influence 
whose views have been sought. 

To Make "Pilgrim's Progress" 

There's another Rank project well under 
way, a filming of John Bunyan's "Pilgrim's 
Progress." Humphrey Jennings — rapidly 
climbing script writer — highly regarded by Mr. 
Rank himself, was put to doing a script of the 
Bunyan classic. Other people have essayed 
that hazardous enterprise in the past. Mr. Jen- 
nings has delivered his script, which is now the 
subject of debate among art directors, produc- 
tion managers, publicity experts and the like. 
But Mr. Rank has ordered the film made. 

Symptomatic, maybe, of his concern with 
sacred subjects is the circumstance that Mr. 
Rank lunched recently with the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. There's an organization over here 
— born of war, fostered in the current grave 
anxiety of the nation — known as the Christian 
Forward Movement. Its announced function 
is to promote discussion of secular develop- 



ments. Inevitably the motion picture came on 
the Movement's agenda. The organizer, 
Michael Clarke, headmaster of Repton School, 
was bidden by the Archbishop to produce for 
debate with him the two most formidable ex- 
perts in films. Mr. Clarke brought Mr. Rank 
and Sir Alexander Korda. 

It is said Sir Alexander shone in wit on the 
occasion. But Mr. Rank, telling Dr. Temple 
(the Archbishop) of his production plans, was 
the more impressive. 

Air Film Next for Two Cities 

Next Two Cities picture definitely to go on 
the floor is Anatole de Grunwald's effort, vari- 
ously known as "For Johnny" and "Rendez- 
vous." It's a tale of Anglo-American coopera- 
tion in the air, written by dramatist Terence 
Rattigan, to be directed by Anthony Asquith. 

The film will be the first of the Two Cities 
films to occupy the stages at Gainsborough's 
Shepherd's Bush plant, under the new arrange- 
ment whereby the Maurice Ostrer facilities are 
placed at the disposal of Del Giudice. 

Trouble has arisen in the case of two early 
hoped-for productions : "Two Cities" and "Six 
Men of Dorset." As previously reported "Two 
Cities" is another tale of Anglo-American en- 
deavor in the war. It was planned by John 
Sutro to make a picture of the perilous con- 
flict between the British matlow (matelot) and 
the American sailor. Half the picture was to 
be done in America, the other in England. And 
both the British Admiralty and the U. S. Navy 
Department had promised to help. But the in- 
vasion has halted the plan. Similarly, "Six 
Men" — tale of Britain's earliest trade union 
martyrs — is held up by the exigencies of war, 
with Roy Boulting named as director, a captain 
in the Army editing film chronicles of battles. 

Portman Set for "Two Worlds" 

In revising their schedule, Mr. Rank's pro- 
duction people have ample scope. Next follow- 
ing "For Johnny" (or "Rendezvous") will be 
"Man of Two Worlds," the story of the Afri- 
can Negro and his tragic entry into the world 
of the whites. Eric Portman, now regarded as 
Britain's foremost star, will figure in this. 

Mr. Portman is scheduled also to play Byron 
in the piece of that name which Mr. Rank has 
been prevailed upon to let be produced imme- 
diately "Two Worlds" is completed. 

Then comes Duff Cooper's "Talleyrand" and 
the screening of Winston Churchill's story of 
his great ancestor, Marborough. There is a 
feeling here that both those last mentioned tales 
will be made in Hollywood by Two Cities 
under the Rank-Skouras plan of joint pro- 
duction. 



Miss Dietrich Lauds Films' 
Value on Fighting Front 

Marlene Dietrich returned to New York after a 
10-week tour of Italian and African war theatres, 
under the auspices of USO-Camp Shows and the 
Hollywood Victory Committee, and reaffirmed the 
importance of films to the morale of the men on 
the fighting lines. Miss Dietrich will return to 
Hollywood shortly to discuss plans for her next 
MGM picture. 



A broad expansion of equipment service to ex-U. 
hibitors was disclosed by the RCA Victor division ' 
of the Radio Corporation of America with the an- 
nouncement that a complete line of theatre equip- 
ment would be offered exhibitors in the immediate 
post-war period. 

Homer B. Snook, -sales manager of the com- 
pany's theatre equipment section, declared that in 
addition to a full line of RCA sound reproducing 
systems, Brenkert projectors, and RCA screens,^ 
the equipment to be offered under the new ex- 
panded policy included nationally known lines of 
power supply equipment, chairs, carpets and other 
accessories. 

Distribution of the new equipment lines will be 
handled in the field by RCA's nationwide organiza-'* 
tion of independent theatre supply dealers, many of 
whom have formerly distributed these same prod 
ucts. 



I 



si 



I ad 
ft 



Print Processing 
Lags in Britain 

The extremely limited color film processing fa- 
cilities available in England as the result of needs 
of government and army film units is causing aj, 
severe distribution problem for commercial films,, j e ; 
the Kinematograph Renters Society general coun- 3 
cil was informed last week. 

Topical films in Technicolor awaiting distribu 
tion in London, among them Paramount's "The 
Story of Dr. Wassell," were in a particularly 
delicate position, inasmuch as prolonged delays 
in color print processing might lead to loss of 
topical value at the box office, it was said. 

As a result of the situation methods were dis-E 
cussed by the KRS general council of grantin 
processing priorities for limited color facilities 
available to new and important features and tq 
Walt Disney short subjects over reissues and the. 
dubbing of foreign versions of British films. 



i id 



i o pi 
vher 
Irani 
he i 



isl : 



lb 



Sfoc 



Mexican Producers Not 
Opposed to Dubbing 

Despite protest of the film players' union and 
studio and theatre workers over exhibition ir 
Mexico of Spanish-dubbed American product, the 
Mexican Producers and Distributors Association isj, 
not opposing the practice, according to Salvador t 
Elizondo, president. 

"I consider the Mexican industry will not be af 
fected in the least with such dubbing and, there 
fore, in behalf of the Mexican producers, do no 
see any inconvenience. if American producers earn 
out their plan and use for that objective Mexicai 
artistes and technicians if they believe that is con 
venient. American pictures dubbed in Spanish," h 
states, "never can prejudice the distribution . o' 
Mexican pictures, inasmuch as the success of thes 
pictures is due not to the language but to the at 
mosphere and the fact that they have already bee: 
enthusiastically accepted by all the Spanish-speak 
ing public on the American continent." 



Improve Film Delivery 
To Troops in France 

Under arrangements approved by the Kinema 
tograph Renters Society general council in Eri 
gland, American troops in France soon will b 
able to see the same films concurrently with thei 
showing to the military in camps in England. Lor 
don distributors will supply the films at toke' 
royalty terms agreed upon with the British Joir 
Ordering Board and the army will fly them. 



Columbia Declares Dividend 

Columbia Pictures Corporation has declared a 
quarterly dividend of 68)4 cents per share on the 
$2.75 convertible preferred stock. 



Industry Gives $34,706 
To New York Fund 

The industry and its employee groups contrit 
uted $34,076 to the Greater New York Fund dui 
ing the period of the 1944 appeal, it was announce 
at the Fund's third report luncheon last week. 



28 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, I9<4'|l!0l 



Reserves Verdict 
On New Trial Plea 
fn New Haven Suit 

, Judge Carroll C. Hincks of the LJ. S. District 
^ourt, New Haven, has reserved decision on the 
laintiff's motion for a new trial and to set aside 
,he verdict of dismissal in the Prefect Theatres, 
Inc., $5,450,000 anti-trust suit against the major 
ompanies, after hearing argument by counsel. An 
nusual exhibit presented by the plaintiff in sup- 
ort of its contention that sufficient evidence of 
onspiracy had been introduced to make it incum- 
bent upon the jury to decide the case, whether 
: should find "nominal" or "substantial" damage, 
xns the interchange of off-the-record correspon- 
dence between one of the jurors in the hearing 
nd the judge. 

George A. Cromie, juror number three, ad- 
dressed the judge three days after the directed 
erdict was entered, stating most of the jurors 
iad believed there was enough "documentary and 
ontributory evidence and common sense inference 
o prove conspiracy," and that they were shocked 
v hen directed to dismiss, and wondered what 
\ ould have happened if they had refused to follow 
he judge's instructions. The judge replied in a 
line-page letter, copies of both correspondence 
wing mailed to both counsel, that "under the law 

. . it was incumbent upon the plaintiff to estab- 
-ish not only a conspiracy but also pecuniary dam- 
ige as a result thereof." "However," he states, 
there is no reason why I should not say that I 
vas left with the impression, apparently like your- 
self, that there was substantial evidence for the 
: ury on that issue," i.e., conspiracy. 

The defendants opposed the motion for a new 
rial and to set aside the verdict generally and filed 
. motion to strike the plaintiff's motion and ex- 
libits from the files, which they later withdrew, 
fudge Hincks asked the counsel to confer on the 
'>ossibility of his entering a ruling denying the 
plaintiff's motion but stating officially what he had 
written unofficially to the juror, that although in 
he judge's personal view there had been sufficient 
evidence of conspiracy, he still adhered to the view 
to damage had been shown. 

Stockholders Approve 
- > athe Lab. Merger 

[ Merger of Pathe Laboratories, Inc., New Jer- 
sey corporation, with the California corporation of 
I he same name, into Pathe Industries, Inc., an 
Ohio corporation, was approved Tuesday at a 
j.tockholdefs' meeting in Bound Brook, N. J. 
' Also approved was the following slate of of- 
ficers: Kenneth M. Young, chairman of the board; 
I. Stinson Young, president; Robert W. Purcell, 
j/ice-president ; Karl Herzog, treasurer ; M. M. 
A lalone, secretary; and C. L. Peckham and Arthur 
|3. Johnson, assistant secretaries and treasurers. 
The board of directors, likewise approved, will 
ronsist of the two Youngs, Mr. Purcell, Henry J. 
JSuild and Raymond J. Morfa. 

Two Cameramen Wounded 
In Normandy Invasion 

Three casualties, including one unnamed fatality, 
:w ere among the 16 British Army cameramen who 
were dropped by parachute in Normandy. Sgt. D. 
ST. O'Neill, formerly of Fox Photos, and Sgt. Wil- 
liam Greenhaigh, former Pathe newsreel man, were 
wounded. Others in the group, which got film 
off for England before noon of D-Day, June 6, 
,\vere: J. H. Mapham, A. C. O. Laing, A. M. 
Midgeley, J. P. Christie, W. N. Slague, D. W. 
Ginger, J. N. Johnson, H. Parkinson, I. J. Grant, 
R. Learherborrow, G. E. J. Laws, R. V. Watkins, 
A. C. Cross and P. F. Carpenter. 



Johnston Joins International 

John LeRoy Johnston was named director of ad- 
vertising and publicity for International Pictures 
this week, succeeding Jack Mulcahy, resigned. 
Mr. Johnston goes to International from a similar 
post at Republic studios. 



Industry War Record Cited 
In Congressional Record 

A close-up of the war contribution of the motion 
picture industry was inserted this week in the 
Congressional Record by Senator George L. Rad- 
cliffe of Maryland. 

Submitting the report of the theatres division 
of the War Activities Committee for inclusion in 
the last number of the Record to be issued prior 
to the Congressional recess, Senator Radcliffe 
called attention "to the splendid work which is 
being done by the theatres of the country in con- 
nection with war activities." 

The WAC report shows that 16,432 theatres are 
members of the theatres division and, in addition 
to showing war pictures and news clips which 
are made available, last year raised nearly $8,- 
000,000 for infantile paralysis, the Red Cross and 
United Nations Relief, a figure which already has 
been exceeded this year with $4,000,000 collected 
for infantile paralysis and over $6,000,000 for the 
Red Cross. 



Raw Stock Shows 
Sharp Increase 

Film production in 1943 reached a total of 546,- 
000,000 feet, it was disclosed at the weekend by 
the War Production Board. 

Statistics regarding film manufacture, showing 
an increase last year of 30 per cent as compared 
with 1941, were given by officials of the motion 
picture section to the photographic film industry 
advisory committee. 

While excellent progress has been made in in- 
creasing the production of film it was said further 
increase in some types might be necessary to meet 
increasing military and industrial needs. Members 
of the industry committee urged that military pro- 
grams be developed as far in advance as possible 
so that manufacturers of film might have time to 
plan production. 

Loew's Will Retire Bonds 
Of Cleveland Subsidiary 

Loew's, Inc., was to retire all of the bonded debt 
of its subsidiary, Cleveland Theatres, Inc., July 1 
at par and accrued interest, according to an an- 
nouncement by Edgar A. Hahn, Cleveland counsel 
for Loew's. The debt aggregates $1,500,000. It is 
secured by the State, Stillman, Ohio, Park and 
Granada theatres, all of which are operated by 
Cleveland Theatres, Inc. 

The obligations include about $150,000 in first 
mortgage bonds of the Stillman theatre plus $750,- 
000 of first mortgage and generals, and first mort- 
gage leaseholds of about $600,000 on other prop- 
erties. Interest on the issues is five to 5.42 per cent. 

The five per cent generals will be paid at the 
Cleveland Trust Company, and the other issues 
at the National City Bank. Loew's, Inc., has a 
94.78 voting control of the five theatres, according 
to Mr. Hahn. 

20th-Fox Denies Charge 
In Title and Song Case 

. The suit by Maude Nugent Jerome alleging un- 
lawful use of the title and song "Sweet Rosie 
O'Grady" in the Twentieth Century-Fox picture of 
that name, was answered in New York Federal 
Court Monday with a general denial, a request for 
dismissal of the suit, and an assertion that some 
of the words and music were used because the 
company was entitled to use them inasmuch as 
they were assertedly in the public domain. At the 
same time, the plaintiff, and Samuel J. Buzzell, 
and Jack Mills, associated in the complaint, were 
named Tuesday in a notice filed by the film com- 
pany for trial examinations and stipulated to by 
the defense. 



Set Warner Trade Shows 

Ben Kalmenson, general sales manager for War- 
ner Bros., has set national trade show dates for 
three pictures next month. "Mr. Skeffington" will 
be screened Monday, July 17. "Janie," first release 
of the 1944-45 season, and "Crime by Night" will 
be shown Monday, July 24. 



Appeal Board 
Modifies Award 
In Buffalo Case 

Modifying the award of Will iam Barrett, arbi- 
trator in the Buffalo tribunal, in the Basil Broth- 
ers' La Salle theatre clearance case, the Arbitra- 
tion Appeal Board June 23 in New York handed 
down its decision following oral arguments pre- 
sented in May. 

The arbitrator had reduced the 35 to 30-day 
clearance of the Strand, Cataract and Bellevue, 
first run theatres in Niagara Falls, N. Y., over 
the La Salle, to 17 days. Basil Brothers had ap- 
pealed the award, in Buffalo's 24th case, demand- 
ing a further cut to seven days, claiming that no 
substantial competition existed between the LaSalle 
and the first runs. 

The board found that competition did exist and 
that, therefore, first runs were "entitled to reason- 
able protection" of a maximum of 30 days' clear- 
ance over the LaSalle. It further based its decision 
on the fact that the "LaSalle's admission price is 
20 cents less than that of the first runs and it has 
recently installed a parking space accommodating 
200 automobiles, indicating an attempt to draw 
patrons from a much larger area." 

Intervenors were the Cataract Theatre Corpora- 
tion and Buffalo Theatres, Inc. Costs were divided 
equally among the Basil Brothers, the five con- 
senting companies and intervenors. 

The clearance complaint of G. L. Smith, oper- 
ator of the York theatre, Los Angeles, against the 
five distributors was dismissed last Friday by 
Irvin Stalmaster, arbitrator, in the tribunal's 16th 
case. Mr. Smith demanded that the seven-day 
clearance of the Park and Franklin be eliminated 
and that the York be granted the same availability 
as other Los Angeles suburban houses charging 
the same admission prices. He also asked that the 
York be permitted to have 49-day clearance after 
Los Angeles first runs. The arbitrator found exist- 
ing clearances reasonable. Intervenors were the 
East River Theatre Corporation and Laemmle 
Theatres. 

Hearing on the clearance complaint of the Gro- 
ton theatre, New Haven, the tribunal's eighth case, 
before A. A. Rubicoff, arbitrator, will be con- 
tinued July 10 and 11, it was learned Monday. 

A new clearance complaint was filed at New 
York Wednesday by the Stillson Realty Corpo- 
ration, operator of the Cameo, Astoria, L. I., 
against all five consenting distributors, claiming 
the seven-day clearance granted the defendants 
over the Crescent in Astoria "unreasonable as to 
time and area." Complainant seeks the clearance 
eliminated. 

A new clearance complaint was filed last 
Wednesday at the Boston tribunal, the 35th case. 
The L.G.M. Memorial Theatre Corporation, oper- 
ator of the L.G.M. Memorial theatre, Lowell, 
Mass., against Paramount and RKO, claims that 
its 30-day clearance after the Rialto, which follows 
Lowell first runs by 60 days, is unreasonable and 
asks that it be reduced to 28 days between first 
and second run and to 15 days between second 
and third run. Named as intervenors were the 
Strand, Keith's, Merrimack, Rialto and others. 

O'Bannon Is Promoted by 
Ross Federal Service 

E. C. O'Bannon, Ross Federal Service branch 
manager at the New Haven has been promoted to 
manager at Cincinnati, and B. J. Brooks, national 
supervisor for the New England area, has taken 
over the New Haven post. Mr. O'Bannon joined 
Ross in 1939 and in 1942 was appointed service 
manager. 

Obsolete RKO Tickets Go 
To Waste Collection 

Seven and a half tons of obsolete tickets were 
contributed by RKO theatres to New York City's 
waste paper collection last week. The change in 
the amusement tax law made it necessary for all 
theatres to destroy all admission tickets with the 
former lower tax printed on them. 



- MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



29 





















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Fighting Fifth War Loan 



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Bolstad Warns 
Theatre Boom 
May Be Ending 

Highlighted by a warning that an end of the cur- 
rent business boom is near, and that increased 
exploitation attention is necessary, business prob- 
lems occupied the attention of western Canada 
managers of the Famous Players Canadian circuit, 
who convened last week at Banff Springs, Al- 
berta. The warning was delivered by R. W. Bol- 
stad, vice-president, who also cautioned that men 
returning from service might not be satisfied with 
junior positions. 

Other speakers were J. J. Fitzgibbons, presi- 
dent, who at a ceremony was made a chief of the 
Sacree Indians ; L. I. Bearg, who was appointed 
general western Canadian division manager ; E. 
A. Zorn, who becomes general supervisor for 
Winnipeg and Calgary districts ; Frank Kershaw, 
named general supervisor for downtown Van- 
couver ; James R. Nairn, public relations direc- 
tor ; Vic Armand and George Cuthbert, of the 
sound and projection department; Ben Geldsaler, 
C. S. Neville, Syd Gunn. 

Among the guests were Senator J. W. de B. 
Farris, Vancouver, a circuit director ; Wendell 
Farris, chief justice of British Columbia, and Bob 
Scott, Vancouver. 

Associate partners present were Morris and Ted 
Beatty, Red Deer, Alta. ; James Butler and N. C. 
Byers, Saskatoon; W. P. Dewees, British Colum- 
bia ; H. Durham, Shaunavon ; Alex, Arnold and 
Clarence Entwisle, Edmonton ; Mary and Christine 
Graham, Regina ; K. M. Leach, Calgary ; Clarence 
Marshall, North Battleford ; Jack and Nathan 
Miles, Winnipeg; E. W. Shackleford, Lethbridge; 
R. C. Sutherland, Weyburn; J. D. Watson, Re- 
gina; Sam Weiner, Winnipeg. 

Managers attending the conference were: Ivan Ackery, 
Orpheum, Vancouver; C. Bahrynowski, Metropolitan, Re- 
gina; H. A. Bishop, Capitol, Winnipeg; H. Black, Capi- 
tol, Penticton; D. Borland, Capitol, Prince Rupert: O'tus 
Bowes, Orpheum, Moose Jaw; L. V. Campbell, Strand, 
Trail; Paul Cardell, Calgary; G. Carson, Royal, Fort 
William; Martin Cave, Kerrisdale, Vancouver; Roy 
Chown, Strand, Calgary; C. Denham, Dominion, Victoria: 
C. D'illey, Colonial, F'ort Arthur; C. Doctor, Dominion, 
Vancouver; P. D. Egan, Palace, Calgary; D. Fairleigh, 
Hollywood, Vancouver; E. P. Fields, Capitol, Moose Jaw; 
Frank Gow, Jr., Broadway, Vancouver. 

J. M. Gow, Capitol, Nanaimo; Harold Gray, Orpheum, 
Fort William; Harry Gray, Lyceum, Winnipeg; H. Gunn 
Osborne, Winnipeg; W. Harper, Empress, Kelowna; C. J 
Hughes, Capitol, Nelson; Miss M. Hughes, Tivoli, Winni 
peg; Bob Hurwitz, Starland, Winnipeg; M. Joiner, Capi 
tol, Vancouver; Roy Keil, Strand, Edmonton; Bill Lacey 
Variety. Calgary; Joe Millman, Kitsilano, Vancouver; C 
S. Neville, Vancouver; W. V. Novak, Metropolitan, Win- 
nipeg; R. Plumb, Daylight, Saskatoon; S. Pooley, Strand 
Vancouver; Miss S. Precious, Winnipeg; M. Preiswerck, 
Atlas, Victoria; J. Proudlove, Gaiety, Winnipeg; Les 
Pugsley, Empress, Edmonton; J. Pungente, Capitol, Bran- 
don; Jack Randall, Capitol, Calgary; Morris Rice, Prin- 
cess, Edmonton; Dave Robertson, Uptown, Winnipeg. 

J. Robertson, Capitol, Victoria; Sam Rosenblat, West- 
ern theatres, Winnipeg; Miss A. Scriven, Stanley, Van- 
couver; G. Shafer, Lyceum, Port Arthur; Miss D. Sin- 
claire, Alma, Vancouver; Claude Smith, Chill, Chilliwack; 
M. Stackhouse, Windsor, Vancouver; J. Stevenson, West- 
ern theatres, Winnipeg; H. Summers, Strand. Brandon; 
Charles Taylor, Flay house, Portage, La Prairie; T. 
Thompson, Grandview, Vancouver; F. Tickell, Capitol, 
Fort William; P. Tucker, Capitol, Kamloops; Lance Web- 
ber, Regent, Vancouver; G. West, Crescent, Winnipeg; 
Miss E. Wikien, Lake. Fort William; F. L. Willis, Capi- 
ton, Regina; W. P. Wilson, Capitol, Edmonton; Bill Wil- 
son, Garneau. Edmonton; W. E. Winterton, Capitol, Sas- 
katoon, and E. Zetterman, Columbia, New Westminst<"- 



Legion Changes Rating on 
"Passage to Marseille" 

Warners' "Passage to Marseille" has been 
changed by the Legion of Decency from a Class 
B, objectionable in part, rating to Class A-2, unob- 
jectionable for adults, because "from the negative 
and all existing positive prints has been removed 
the sequence upon which the Legion's objection, 
'the unethical killing of helpless enemies is sym- 
pathetically presented,' had been based." Six other 
films were held to be acceptable by the Legion 
this week. 

They were: "The Great Moment," "Marine 
Raiders," "She's a Soldier, Too," and "Twilight 
on the Prairie," all Class A-l, for general patron- 
age. In Class A-2 were "The Girl Who Dared" 
and "Take It Big." 



32 



Sears Plans London Trip 
To Study UA Operation 

Confirming reports of several weeks ago, Grad- 
well L. Sears, vice-president in charge of distribu- 
tion for United Artists, said last weekend in New 
York that he planned to leave for London as soon 
as transportation could be arranged. It was indi- 
cated that Mr. Sears would survey UA's British 
operations while in England and that he would 
discuss with J. Arthur Rank arrangements for 
UA quota production. A study of the company's 
Odeon Circuit interests also is on his London 
agenda. David H. Coplan, former UA Canadian 
distribution head, has been acting managing di- 
rector for United Artists in England since E. T. 
Carr resigned to join Eagle-Lions Films Ltd., the 
new Rank distribution company organized earlier 
this year. 



DeSylva in Deal 
With Paramount 

Paramount this week announced the completion 
of a deal by which B. G. "Buddy" DeSylva, execu- 
tive producer of the studio, would be given his own 
production unit on a basis similar to that of Hal 
B. Wallis, who became affiliated with the organi- 
zation a month ago. 

Mr. DeSylva's deal is for not less than three 
years, and may be continued for a longer period. 
He will produce not more than three important 
pictures, and not less than two, annually. Mr. 
DeSylva will continue to carry on his present 
duties as executive producer until September 15, 
after which he will devote his entire time to his 
own production unit. Mr. DeSylva attended the 
University of Southern California, and won fame 
as a song writer while in his early twenties. He 
formed the music publishing firm of DeSylva, 
Brown and Henderson in the late twenties, and be- 
gan to produce musical shows. Later he became 
a film producer, making many of the most suc- 
cessful Shirley Temple pictures for Fox Film 
Corporation. 

Returning to Broadway in 1939, he had three hit 
shows on Broadway simultaneously, "Louisiana 
Purchase," "DuBarry Was a Lady" and "Panama 
Hattie." He took the post of executive producer 
of Paramount three and a half years ago, and has 
made such films as "For Whom the Bell Tolls," 
"Lady in the Dark," "Star Spangled Rhythm," 
"Going My Way," "Wake Island," "So Proudly 
We Hail" and "The Road to Morocco." 



Sound Men's Contract 
Approved by WLB 

The first of the new contracts recently negotiated 
between the IATSE and Altec, RCA and the sound 
maintenance departments of the large circuits 
covering 560 sound maintenance men, has been 
approved by the War Labor Board. The contract 
covers some 33 sound maintenance men throughout 
the country employed by the Warner theatre cir- 
cuit. 



Boucher Joins Meiselman 

Frank Boucher, for the past two and a half 
years general manager of the Washington K-B 
Theatres, leaves that post July 15 to become gen- 
eral manager of the Meiselman Theatres in the 
Carolinas. Prior to joining K-B, Mr. Boucher 
was New York zone manager for the Schine Cir- 
cuit. 



To Get Back Wages 



Welgot Trailer Service, New York City, and 
Consolidated Film Industries, Inc., Fort Lee, N. J., 
have voluntarily agreed to reimburse their em- 
ployees for back wages and overtime due them un- 
der the Fair Labor Standards Act. As a result, 
32 employees will receive a total of $3,712.61. 



Sergeant Arneel Wounded 

Sergeant Gene T. Arneel, formerly of the edi- 
torial staff of Motion Picture Daily, has been 
wounded in action in Italy, according to word re- 
ceived in New York. Sgt. Arneel has served on 
the Italian front for more than six months. 



McNutt Suggests 
National Tribute 
To Film Industry 

The United States should pay tribute to the film 
industry's aid in mobilizing the country's manpower 
for war. The suggestion came this week from Paul 
V. McNutt, chairman of the War Manpower Com- 
mission. Mr. McNutt conferred Tuesday in Wash- 
ington with a War Activities Committee sub- 
committee on the form of such a tribute. The sub- 
committee comprised Ned E. Depinet, RKO Radio 
Pictures president; Leon Bamberger and A. A. 
Schubart, RKO ; Tom Connors, Twentieth Cen- 
tury Fox, and Henderson M. Richey, MGM. 

They also are members of the WAC distribu- 
tors' division, and discussed with Mr. McNutt the 
industry's own manpower problems, inasmuch as 
distribution has been ruled not "locally needed" 
and local exchanges must appeal individually to 
regional war labor boards for solution of prob- 
lems. The conferees late Tuesday afternoon termed 
their talk with Mr. McNutt "pleasing" but added 
"the matter is at present in abeyance." 

Mr. McNutt's suggestion that the country sig- 
nalize the film industry's aid in recruiting also was 
outlined in a letter to the WAC early in June. He 
wrote : "We have in mind the development of a 
series of recognition programs which are to be 
known as national salutes to manpower. . . . We 
should like to give credit nationally to the motion 
picture industry for its achievement. . . . This in- 
cludes not only the producers, stars and exhibitors, 
but the rank and file of the industry." 



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Union Financial 
Ruling Stands 

The Internal Revenue Bureau has announced 
that no changes will be made in the former regu 1 
lations for the filing of financial statements by 
unions and other tax-exempt organizations, due 
August 15. 

It was disclosed, however, that where a parent 
organization files group returns for its local or- 
ganizations, the parent must file a separate return 
covering its own income and expenditures. Any 
subordinate organization included in a group re- 
turn which has income from rents or business ac- 
tivities must file a separate balance sheet as part 
of the group report. 

The form for the filing of these returns was 
made available last week. 



Hochstein's Trial Is 
Delayed to September 5 



The trial of Harry Hochstein, former Chicago 
official, scheduled for Monday, was postponed in 
Federal Court, New York, until September 5, 
Boris Kostelanetz, special assistant U. S. Attorney 
General, announced. 

. Hochstein is charged with perjury before a spe- 
cial Federal grand jury probing racketeering in 
the industry. According to Mr. Kostelanetz, Hoch- 
stein lied when he testified that George E. Browne, 
convicted head of the IATSE, and William Bioff, 
convicted labor racketeer, were not present with 
certain members of the Capone mob in Hoch- 
stein's Riverside, 111., home in 1934. 

During the recent trial, which resulted in the 
conviction of six Capone ring gangsters, and a 
Newark, N. J., IATSE leader, it was brought out 
that the Capone mob planned the 1934 election 
of Browne to the IATSE presidency in Hoch- 
stein's home. 



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Honor Levine in New Haven 

A large group of film and other friends attended 
a farewell luncheon party for Hyman Levine, new 
salesman at Boston for Warners, at the Hotel Taft, 
June 26. Mr. Levine has been in the New Haven 
film territory for 25 years, starting as Selznick ex- 
change manager in 1919. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



Publicity by WAC 
Stresses Free 
Films for Troops 

In order to acquaint the general public with its 
activities, the War Activities Committee is now 
engaged in a varied and far-reaching publicity 
campaign. Special attention is being directed 
toward publicizing the industry's gifts to the 
Army Overseas Motion Picture Service. The 
campaign is under the general supervision of Fran- 
cis Harmon, executive vice-chajrman of the WAC. 

An emblem has been devised, to appear on early 
autumn releases, which will call attention to the 
fact that the picture is also being shown to service- 
men stationed in combat areas overseas. 

A lobby poster has been designed to inform the 
friends and relatives of soldiers that pictures fea- 
tured in American theatres are being exhibited on 
the battlefronts in all theatres of war where 
Americans are stationed. This poster will be sent 
to the 16,000 cooperating theatres. 

Window displays, saluting the industry's gift 
shows to GI's abroad, shortly will be seen in large 
department stores throughout the nation. Associ- 
ated Merchandising Corporation is furnishing the 
displays. 

In an early August issue the Saturday Evening 
Post will carry an article by Pete Martin telling 
the entire story of the 16mm gift films. Follow- 
ing this, a two-color poster, designed by Curtis 
Publishing Company, depicting the story of the 
gift films, also will be released to the 16,000 thea- 
tres. 

Western Newspaper Unit has issued a story 
about the project which has gone out to 2,500 
newspapers. Several other stories have been sent 
to newspapers in key cities for use in special Sun- 
day sections. Magazines and picture syndicates 
are being covered with photographs showing front 
line exhibitions of the 16mm films. Publicity also 
has gone out to radio stations. 

A picture, "Movies at War," made by the Sig- 
nal Corps of the U. S. Army and released through 
the War Activities Committee, has started its first 
runs in U. S. Theatres. The film tells the story 
of the project. 



Cites Rise in Overseas 
Showings for Troops 

Overseas film performances rose to over 93,000 
shows and were attended by 32,706,193 persons in- 
clusive of last April, Maj. John W. Hubbell, chief 
of the Army overseas motion picture service, told 

j representatives of the industry at a luncheon yes- 

1 terdav at the Beverly-Wilshire Hotel, Hollywood. 
He also declared that attendance had doubled since 
the monthly average had fallen off in January, and 
discussed in detail the method of operating the 
overseas branch of the film service. 

Lt.-Col. Joseph McMicking, aide of Gen. Mac- 
Arthur in charge of entertainment in the South 
Pacific, eulogized the industry for free 16mm. 
prints, and said, "If men took a popular vote, I 
do not doubt but they would vote an 'E' pennant 
tor the industry's contribution." 
Other speakers were Mary C. McCall, junior 

; chairman, executive committee of the WAC, Hol- 
lywood division, Joseph H. Seidelman, civilian con- 
sultant to the War Department on the gift films, 

Land John C. Flinn. 

Mar+el Honored at Luncheon 

Thomas H. Martel, New York representative of 
the U. S. Army Motion Picture Service, which 
buys films for 1,174 Army theatres throughout the 
country, was guest of honor last week at a luncheon 
at the Hotel Adolphus, Dallas, given by J. B. Un- 
derwood, southwestern division manager of Colum- 
bia in Dallas. The luncheon was preceded by a 
cocktail party at the Variety Club. 



Skouras' Daughter Wed 

I Diana Athanasia Skouras, daughter of. Spyros 

■ Skouras, president of Twentieth Century-Fox, 

] and Mrs. Skouras, was married Tuesday to Dr. 

■ George Anderson Fowler, at the Holy Trinity 
Church, Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



IN NEWS REELS 



MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 28, Nol 85— Allied air forces 
aid land attack in drive on Cherbourg. . . . Chinese 
construct huge airfield for B-29's by hand labor. . . . 
Tito of Yugoslavia filmed in hideout with partisans. 
. . . Italian political leaders form new government. . . . 
In memoriam. . . . Angels of mercy. . . . Air cadets 
swim. . . . Royal horse show. 

MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 26, No. 86— GOP convention 
meets in Chicago. . . .• President signs GI Bill of Rights 
for service men. . . . Girls in war industry. . . . Major 
Wasmer candidate for governor. . . . Rome welcomes 
Highlanders, kilts ad all. . . . Latest pictures from 
France as Cherbourg falls. 

NEWS OF THE DAY— Vol. IS, No. 28J-Battle for Cher- 
bourg. . . . First films of Marshal Tito. . . . Chinese 
manpower miracle creates U. S. bombing base. . . . 
Avenue of the Allies. . . . Princess Elizabeth heads a 
hospital. 

NEWS OF THE DAY — Vol. 15, No. 284— GOP convention 
highlights : Warren is keynoter ; spotlight on Dewey 
. . . Liberated French cheer De Gaulle. . . . American 
reserves pour in. . . . King George visits front. . . . Bill 
of Rights for GI Joe. . . . Army host to Rosie the 
Riveter. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 86— Report from Free Rome. 
. . . Time out from war, Royal horse show. . . . First 
pictures of Tito's Yugoslav Partisans. . . . Paramount 
News presents B-29 drama. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 87— Cherbourg payoff. . . . 
Front line leaders. King George and General Eisen- 
hower. . . . Return to France — people of Bayeaux greet 
General De Gaulle. . . . Tornado disaster. . . . Nylons, 
5,000 pair. . . . 1944 Republican convention. 

RKO PATHE NEWS— Vol. 15, No. 88— Yanks, British 
win Carentan, Bayeux. . . . First films — inside Yugo- 
slavia with Tito. . . . 70,000 coolies build B-29 Superfort 
base. 

RKO PATHE NEWS — Vol. 15, No. 89— Republicans open 
Chicago convention. . . . FDR signs GI Bill of Rights. 
. . . General De Gaulle returns to France. . . . Rein- 
forcements pour into French beachheads. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEL— Vol. 17, No. 305— New regime 
in Italy. . . . Marshall Tito harries Nazis. . . . 5,000th 
Liberator. . . . Flying fish galore. . . . GOP in con- 
vention. . . . Proud mother of 23. . . . Royalty at horse 
show. . . . Aussie heroes home. . . . Avenue of Allies. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEL— Vol. 17, No. 306— GOP meets 
to name candidate. . . . Allies advance in France. . . . 
FDR signs GI Joe bill. . . . Tornado sweeps two 
states. . . . WAAFS don WAC uniform. 

ALL AMERICAN NEWS— Vol. 2, No. 88— Africans train 
for British Navy. . . . Negro publishers convene in 
New York. . . . Major Roberts of the 99th at Seder 
Center. . . . Chicago shows captured equipment and 

■ sells Bonds. . . . Select "Miss Harlem" in beauty con- 
test. . . . First pictures: Famous 93rd Division fights 
wilderness of Bougainville. 



PCCITO Trustees Hear 
Reports on Meetings 

Reports from their representatives on recent 
meetings with Attorney General Tom C. Clark, 
and with George McMurphey, chief of the theatre 
section of the Office of Civilian Requirements of 
the War -Production Board, and a report on the 
recent national Allied States Association board 
meeting in Philadelphia were heard in Portland, 
Ore., last week by trustees of the Pacific Coast 
Conference of Independent Theatre Owners. At- 
tending were Hugh Bruen, George Diamos, Rotus 
Harvey, L. O. Lukan, Leroy Johnson, J. M. Hbne, 
O. J. Miller, M. Mallecheck, William Graeper, 
Jr., Bob White. Mr. Graeper was elected trustee. 

Republic to Open 
Mexican Branch 

Morris Goodman, Republic's vice-president in 
charge of foreign sales, has left for Mexico City, 
where he will complete arrangements for the open- 
ing of a Republic branch office to handle sales and 
distribution in Mexico. The company recently set 
up its own distribution offices in Argentina, Bra- 
zill, Chile and Panama. 



Three in Technicolor for Republic 

Herbert J. Yates, chairman of the board, and 
James R. Grainger, president and general sales 
manager of Republic Pictures, announce that a 
contract has been signed with Technicolor Motion 
Picture Corporation, and that three top-budget 
productions will be filmed in Technicolor during 
the next 12 months. 



Fitzgibbon Sees 
New Producing in 
Eastern Studios 

Resurging feature production in New York is 
anticipated by the Fox Movietone Studio, which 
has a new stage, is adding the latest and best in 
sound equipment, and plans a post-war stage 
nearby. 

'We've already outgrown what we have, even 
with two stages — we're going about 90 per cent 
of the time and we need another stage," Steve E. 
Fitzgibbon, manager of the studio, said in his of- 
fice Monday. 

Mr. Fitzgibbon said the studio always bid for 
Eastern production, and with the production there 
of Sol Lesser's "Stage Door Canteen" the tenden- 
cy to regard Eastern production as feasible has 
grown so that now, "there's not a week but what 
one or more producers or people who would like to 
produce come in here seeking to promote an East- 
ern production." 

The studio is now the only large one, and the 
only one with completely modern facilities, avail- 
able for Eastern production, he noted. The form- 
er Eastern .Service Studio, Astoria, is operated by 
the Army Signal Corps ; the Warner Vitaphone 
studio in Brooklyn is closed. 

War Interrupted Attempt 

"I was in touch with the Mayor here several 
years ago when he wanted production to move 
from Hollywood to the East," Mr. Fitzgibbon 
said; "and the war interrupted the efforts of 
Clendenning Ryan, who he had appointed to pro- 
mote such production. However, Mr. Ryan, be- 
fore leaving for service, said he would resume his 
efforts because it was an important effort for New 
York City. And, lately, I have been in touch with 
Mayor LaGuardia, who has asked me to keep him 
informed." 

Mr. Fitzgibbon's talks with producers could not 
be detailed, he said, but he disclosed that Edward 
Alperson, former RKO circuit general manager, 
who resigned several weeks ago to enter produc- 
tion, probably for United Artists release, and who 
purchased the stage play, "Decision," had been 
interested in producing at the studio. Mr. Fitz- 
gibbon said that financial negotiations had been on 
for three weeks. 

He added that the Sol Lesser production stirred 
the interest of OWI figures such as Garson Ka- 
nin, Burgess Meredith and Jean Renoir, so that 
several propaganda pictures for overseas have been 
filmed. The success of these has in turn stirred 
the interest of regular producers who also, he 
noted, had seen the success of other Eastern gov- 
ernment production such as the pictures done at 
Astoria by the Signal Corps. All of which had 
proved to them, he said, the practicability of East- 
ern production. 

Studio Has Two Stages 

The Fox Movietone Studio, at 360 West 54th 
Street, New York, comprises two stages. One, 
built in 1928, is 106 by 75 feet, and 35 feet high. 
The other, built two years ago, is 125 by 105 feet, 
and 85 feet high. A third, which will be built after 
the war, will be on a lot 125 by 100 feet, at 10th 
Avenue and 53rd Street. 

Available for the present two stages are three 
recording channels, RCA and Westinghouse ; two 
mixing rooms, which will shortly be supplemented 
by another ; a complete and very large Carrier 
air-conditioning system ; a large prop department ; 
recording studios; three projection rooms; the 
latest equipment. The latter is installed, and being 
installed, on high priority, a factor possible be- 
cause OWI shorts have been filmed at the studios 
and because the Movietone newsreel, ruled essen- 
tial, is produced twice weeekly there. 

The studio handles, in addition to the film cate- 
gories mentioned, the mixing for the Terrytoon 
studios, certain recording and other work for the 
parent company, Twentieth Century-Fox, testing 
and short subjects for all the other major pro- 
ducers, and commercial pictures for concerns such 
as Jam Handy. The commercial work comprises 
about 40 per cent of the total. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



33 



RED RYDER COMES 




PRESOLD TO MILLIONS through 



Red Ryder Cartoon Strip in over 700 newspapers 
with a combined circulation of 15,000,000! 

The power-packed series of Red Ryder books . . . 
5,000,000 currently in circulation! 

Red Ryder comic magazines with a fan following) 
of 3,000,000! 



This tremendous audience is waiting to see Red Ryder 



I i 




* TUCSON RAIDERS * 
MARSHAL OF RENO 
★ 

VIGILANTES OF DODGE CITY 
GREAT STAGECOACH ROBBERY 
SHERIFF OF LAS VEGAS 
LONE TEXAS RANGER 
SAN ANTONIO KID 
CHEYENNE WILDCAT 

i ... , 



STEPHEN SUSINGER, N. Y. 



Harmon's Famous NEA Comic 
By special arrangement with Stephen Slesinger 



TO THE SCREEN... 



THE MOST POPULAR CARTOON CHARACTER 
OF TODAY IN 8 REPUBLIC OUTDOOR DRAMAS 





Another Scoop For 

REPUBLIC 

Showmanship 



WILD BILL ELLIOTT <m RED RYDER 
BOBBY BLAKE «* LITTLE BEAVER 
ALICE FLEMING ** THE DUCHESS 

JOIN THE FIGHTING FIFTH WAR LOAN 



Roy Del Ruth, director 



William A. Wellman, director 



Wesley Ruggles, director 



BROADWAY RHYTHM: Metro -Goldwyn- 
Mayer. Produced by Jack Cummings. 
Directed by Roy Del Ruth. Screenplay by 
Dorothy Kingsley and Harry Clork. Story by 
Jack McSowan. Based on musical, "Very 
Warm for May", by Jerome Kern and Oscar 
Hammerstein II. Cast: George Murphy, 
Ginny Simms, Charles Winninger, Nancy 
Walker. Release date, March, 1944. 



BUFFALO BILL: Twentieth Century- Fox. Pro- 
duced by Harry A. Sherman. Directed by 
William A. Wellman. Screenplay by Aeneas 
MacKenzie. Based on story by Frank Winch. 
Director of photography, Leon Shamroy. 
Technicolor director, Natalie Kalmus. Cast: 
Joel McCrea, Maureen O'Hara, Linda Dar- 
nell, Thomas Mitchell. Release date, April, 
1 944. 



SEE HERE, PRIVATE HARGROVE: Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer. Produced by George 
Haight. Directed by Wesley Ruggles. 
Screenplay by Harry Kurnitz. Based upon 
book by Marion Hargrove. Director of pho- 
tography, Charles Lawton. Musical score, 
David Snell. Cast: Robert Walker, Donna 
Reed, Keenan Wynn, Robert Benchley, Ray 
Collins. Release date, March, 1944. 




David Butler, director 

SHINE ON HARVEST MOON: Warner Bros. 
Produced by William Jacobs. Directed by 
David Butler. Screenplay by Sam Hellman, 
Richard Weil, Francis Swann and James Kern. 
Based on original story by Richard Weil. 
Director of photography, Arthur Edeson. Art 
director, Charles Novi. Cast: Ann Sheridan, 
Dennis Morgan, Jack Carson, Irene Manning. 
Release date, April 8, 1944. 




Sidney Lanfield, director 

STANDING ROOM ONLY: Paramount. As- 
sociate producer, Paul Jones. Directed by 
Sidney Lanfield. Screenplay by Darrell Ware 
and Karl Tunberg. Based on a story by Al 
Martin. Director of photography, Charles 
Lang. Musical score, Robert Emmett Dolan. 
Cast: Fred MacMurray, Paulette Goddard, 
Edward Arnold, Hillary Brooke, Roland 
Young. Release date, March 10, 1944. 




Elliot Nugent, director 

UP IN ARMS: RKO Radio. Produced by 
Samuel Goldwyn. Associate producer, Don 
Hartman. Directed by Elliot Nugent. Orig- 
inal screenplay by Don Hartman, Allen 
Boretz and Robert Pirosh. Musical numbers 
arranged and conducted by Ray Heindorf. 
Cast: Danny Kaye, Dinah Shore, Dana An- 
drews, Constance Dowling, Louis Calhern. 
No release date set. 



36 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 % 

J L 



rHE HOLLYWOOD SCENE 



Completed 

SONOGRAM 

Muggs Meets a Dead- 
line 

RC 

rwing Hostess 

IKO RADIO 

Fall in the Saddle 

:epublic 

Zode of the Prairie 
^an Fernando Valley 
JNIVERSAL 

3e It Ever So Humble 

Started 

lOLUMBIA 

Texas Rifles 



MONOGRAM 

Trigger Law 
Baby Shoes 
PRC 

When the Lights Go on 

Again 
PARAMOUNT 

Kitty 

Out of This World 
Double Exposure 

(Pine-Thomas) 
REPUBLIC 
Man of Mystery 
UNITED ARTISTS 

Tomorrow the World 

( Cowan) 
UNIVERSAL 

The Frozen Ghost 
The Old Texas Trail 



WARNERS 

The Corn Is Green 

Shooting 

COLUMBIA 

Stalk the Hunter 
Tonight and Every 
Night 

M-G-M 

The Home Front 
Anchors Aweigh 
Airship Squadron 4 
Music for Millions 
Son of Lassie 
The Thin Man Goes 

Home 
Ziegfeld Follies 
The Picture of Dorian 

Gray 



Thirty Seconds Over 

Tokyo 
National Velvet 

PRC 

Bluebeard 
PARAMOUNT 

A Medal for Benny 
Her Heart in Her 
Throat (formerly 
"Fear") 
Here Come the Waves 
Murder, He Says 
Two Years Before the 

Mast 
RKO RADIO 
The Girl Rush 
The Master Race 
My Pal, Wolf (for- 
merly "The Pump- 
kin Shell") 



Farewell, My Lovely 
Having Wonderful 

Crime 
The Princess and the 
Pirate (Goldwyn) 

REPUBLIC 

My Buddy 
Brazil 

Atlantic City 

20TH CENTURY- FOX 

Thunderhead 

A Tree Grows in 

Brooklyn 
Laura 

Something for the 

Boys 
Winged Victory 
UNITED ARTISTS 

Dark Waters 
(Bogeaus) 



Story of G. I. Joe 

(Cowan) 
Three's a Family 

(Lesser) 
Guest in the House 

(Stromberg) 

UNIVERSAL 

Can't Help Singing 
My Baby Loves Music 
Queen of the Nile 
In Society 

Bowery to Broadway 
WARNERS 

Christmas in Connecti- 
cut 

Strangers in Our Midst 
Objective Burma 
Roughly Speaking 
Hollywood Canteen 



TOMORROW THE WORLD" IS 
STARTED; 58 IN WORK 



Hollywood Bureau 

Production activity increased last week, as 
2 pictures went before the cameras and six to 
he cutting rooms. At the weekend, there were 
58 features in work. 

Lester Cowan turned cameras on "Tomor- 
row the World," film version of the Broadway 
-uccess. It's about a refugee child who has 
jeen exposed to Nazi philosophy during his 
ormative years, with the result that when he is 
jrought to America and placed in the home of 
'i professor he almost wrecks the household and 
ries to kill the professor's small daughter. 
Two members of the cast, "Skippy" Homeier 
md Edit Angold, play the same roles in the 
ilm version as they did in the New York play. 
r redric March and Betty Field are co-starred 
i.nd Leslie Fenton has been given the direc- 
orial assignment. 

"The Corn Is Green," another filmization of 
i successful play, went into work at Warners, 
fit's about life in a small coal-mining town in 
'.Vales, and Bette Davis is starred. She plays 
'he school teacher, a part which Ethel Barry- 
nore created on Broadway. Others in the cast 
ire John Dall. Joan Loring, Nigel Bruce, Rhys 
Williams and Mildred Dunnock. Irving Rap- 
ier is directing the production for Producer 
ifack Chertok. 

Three New Pictures Are 
Begun at Paramount 

At Paramount, three new films were 
Hunched. 

"Kitty," a historical drama laid in London of 
he 1870's, presents Paulette Goddard as the 
orotege of Sir Thomas Gainsborough, famous 
portrait painter. Ray Milland, Cecil Kellaway, 
Constance Collier and Patric Knowles are in 
:he cast. Karl Tunberg is the associate pro- 
ducer and Mitchell Leisen directs. 

"Out of This World" is a musical presenting 
Eddie Bracken, Diana Lynn, Veronica Lake, 
Cass Daley and Robert Benchley. Hal Walker 
s directing and Sam Coslow is associate pro- 
ducer. 

"Double Exposure" is. a Pine-Thomas ven- 
tre which William Berke is directing. The 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



cast includes Chester Morris, Nancy Kelly, 
Phillip Terry, Jane Farrar, Richard Gaines 
and Charles Arnt. 

Republic launched "Man of Mystery," pre- 
senting June Storey, Edward Norris, John Ab- 
bott and Eddie Fields. George Blair is asso- 
ciate producer and director. 

"Texas Rifles," a Western with Charles Star- 
rett, Tex Harding and Pat Parrish, went into 
work at Columbia. Colbert Clark produces; 
Derwin Abrahams directs. 

Two were started at Universal : a thrill film 
titled "The Frozen Ghost," with Lon Chaney, 
Evelyn Ankers and Martin Kosleck in princi- 
pal parts, and Harold Young directing for asso- 
ciate producer Will Cowan ; "The Old Texas 
Trail," a Western whose cast includes Rod 
Cameron, Fuzzy Knight and Ray Whitley, 
which Lewis Collins directs for Associate Pro- 
ducer Oliver Drake. 

M-G-M Talent Roster 
At 20-Year Peak 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer has 162 players on 
its contract list, the greatest number in the 
studio's history. Ever since its organization 
in 1924 the discovery and development of screen 
personalities has been the company's declared 
policy. Included in the list are 33 stars, also 
the largest number since the founding of the 
studio, which then had only six. 

The stars are Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, 
Judy Garland, Irene Dunne, Spencer Tracy, 
Hedy Lamarr, William Powell, Myrna Loy, 
Katharine Hepburn, Lana Turner, Fred As- 
taire, Wallace Beery, Mickey Rooney, Ann 
Southern, Lucille Ball, Abbott & Costello, 
Frank Sinatra, Marlene Dietrich, Robert 
Young, Robert Donat, Red Skelton, Brian Don- 
levy, Van Johnson, Gene Kelly, Esther Wil- 
liams, Laraine Day, Kathryn Grayson, Ginny 
Simms, George Murphy, Robert Walker, Susan 
Peters and Margaret O'Brien. 

Another studio which has pursued a policy 
of developing young talent is RKO Radio. Out 
of 25 girls who were placed under contract 
during the past year, 10 have been advanced to 
top roles in important pictures. Among the 
newcomers who have been given an opportun- 



ity to demonstrate their ability in roles of mo- 
ment are Barbara Hale, who has the ingenue 
lead in "Heavenly Days" ; Audrey Long, the 
second feminine lead in "Tall in the Saddle"; 
Marcy McGuire, who appeared in "Around the 
World" and "Higher and Higher", and Nancy 
Gates, soon to be seen in an important role in 
"The Master Race." 

Personnel Intelligence 
About Hollywood 

Henry Hathaway has been signed to a new 
long term contract by 20th Century-Fox. The 
same studio has borrowed John Hodiak from 
MGM to play opposite Anne Baxter in "Sun- 
day Dinner for a Soldier." William Eythe, 
originally scheduled for the part, goes into 
"Czarina," opposite Tallulah Bankhead. . . . 
Paramount has added "Ambassadors in White," 
a story of the achievements of American doc- 
tors in the remote portions of" Central America, 
to its 1944-45 schedule. Kenneth MacGowan 
will produce. . . . Virginia Van Upp will pro- 
duce "Road to Yesterday," formerly on Sol 
Siegel's schedule at Columbia. Subsequently, 
Miss Van Upp will produce "And Now Good'- 
bye" and "War Sings a Lullaby." 

Walt Disney has signed Dinah Shore for a 
principal part in "Swing Street." The pro- 
ducer, on his return to Hollywood, disclosed his 
post-war plans, which include filming "Uncle 
Remus," "Cinderella" and "Alice in Wonder- 
land" as combination live action and cartoon 
features. 

Negotiating Sale of Rights 
To "Voice of the Turtle" 

Twentieth Century-Fox has extended Lynn 
Bari's contract for another year. The same 
studio also picked up Allyn Joslyn's option. . . . 
Alfred De Liagre, New York producer, is cur- 
rently in Hollywood to negotiate the sale of the 
film rights of "Voice of the Turtle." . . . Sam 
Wood is making lend-lease arrangements with 
Columbia for the use of 12 glamor girls cur- 
rently supporting Rita Hayworth and Janet 
Blair in "Tonight and Every Night." Wood 
wants them as dance hall girls for his forth- 
coming production, "Jubal Troop." 

Vanguard has purchased half of Edward 
Small's contract with Tony Devlin, strong con- 
tender for the title role in "The Life of Rudolf 
Valentino." . . . Lew Landers has been signed 
to direct a PRC musical, tentatively titled "I'm 
from Arkansas." The picture is scheduled to 
start in mid-July. 

37 



ANOTHER WHAM 





p cr^ ce " 10£ ^ ***** 



FROM MONOGRAM! 



m 



★ That's what MOTION PICTURE HERALD said! 
"Whimsy with a wham . . • a comedy slick as a 
ribbon and full of laughs for all comers." 




'/what the 
picture did for me* 



Columbia 



CRIME DOCTOR: Warner Baxter, Margaret Lindsay 
—Just a fair picture, weak in spots. Played Wednesday, 
Thursday, May 31, June 1.— J. H. Bustin, Imperial Thea- 
tre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

CRIME DOCTOR'S STRANGEST CASE: Warner 
Baxter, Lynn Merrick — Good program picture for week- 
eni" trade and a double bill. My patrons like Warner 
Baxter. Played Friday, Saturday, June 7, 8. — Cleo Man- 
ry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena Vista, Ga. 

RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE: Bela Lugosi, Frieda 
Inescourt — A good picture, but did no business— in fact, 
so poor that we took it off after the first day (had it 
booked Thursday and Friday). In the past six months we 
have found on numerous occasions that spook mystery 
pictures that formerly did an unusually good gross have 
flopped, and when this happens in a theatre catering to 
the kind of patronage we have, it's time the producers 
start considering curtailing so many chiller-dillers. Two 
years ago we would have played a picture like "Return of 
Vampire" on Sunday and Monday. . . today it can't 
hold up for a two day date in mid-week. Played Thurs- 
day, June 8. — Abe H. Kaufman, Fountain Theatre, Terre 
Haute, Ind. Family patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ABOVE SUSPICION: Joan Crawford, Fred MacMurray 
— Very good performances by Joan Crawford and Fred. 
This picture held our audience's attention up to the very 
end. Played Wednesday, May 17. — Sgt. Wm. E. Goe- 
wey, Overseas, APO 887. Military patronage. 

A GUY NAMED JOE: Spencer Tracy, Irene Dunne 
— Did better than average business. Pleased most of au- 
dience. Can recommend it for any exhibitor. — L. G. 
Tewksbury, Opera House Theatre, Stonington, Maine. 
Small town patronage. 

ANDY HARDY'S BLONDE TROUBLE: Mickey 
Rooney, Lewis Stone — Best liked picture that we have 
played this year. Wish we could get more like this. 
Will do well in any location. Played Sunday, May 7. — 
Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. Military 
patronage. 

BROADWAY RHYTHM: George Murphy, Ginny 
Simms — Jam packed with talent from start to finish. 
Just what the public wants and more of it. You can't 
pick out just one for credit, it goes to all the cast. This 
Ginny Simms just sparkled in the picture, and nice voice, 
but the ones that really stopped the show were the sen- 
sational acrobats, the Ross Sisters, and one, I think it 
was Doug Kelly, who topped any one who has crossed 
our screen in his impersonations. I may be in the 
minority but I would like to see some of the top musicals 
brought back— Rose Marie, those of that type. We have 
a precedent for this request in that the good reissues have 
outgrossed the current product. — A. E. Hancock, Co- 
lumbia Theatre, Columbia City, Ind. 

CRY HAVOC: Margaret Sullivan, Ann Sothern— This 
gi feature did not click so hot at the box office. Although 
I ^ the patrons who saw it said it was "Right good." Played 
Sunday, June 4. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, 
Buena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

EYES IN THE NIGHT: Edward Arnold, Ann Hard- 
ing — A marvelous weekend show . . . the dog in the 
picture is superb as is all the action of the picture. Mar- 
velous business, everyone pleased. Flayed Friday, Sat- 
urday, June 16, 17.— Ken Gorham, Town Hall Theatre, 
Middlebury, Vt. 

LASSIE COME HOME: Roddy McDowall, Edmund 
Gwenn — This is one that was tops. Everyone enjoyed 
this one. It's one of the best all around audience pic- 
tures of the season. Play this one by all'means. Played 
Sunday, Monday, June 11, 12.— Bob Neely, Times Thea- 
tre, Jonesboro, 111. Small town patronage. 

SEE HERE, PRIVATE HARGROVE: Robert Walker, 
Donna Reed — Very much enjoyed by our crowd. A lot 
stayed for a second show, which is unusual at our shows. 
Plenty of laughs. Should do well anywhere. Running 
time, 100 min. Played Wednesday, May 3. — Sgt. Wm. E. 
Goewey, Overseas, APO 1 887. Military patronage. 

TUNISIAN VICTORY: Documentary— Educational pic- 
ture that my people did not want to see. Some walked 
out. Business poor.— F. R. Crist, Crist Theatre, Love- 
land, O. Small town patronage. 



Paramount 



NO TIME FOR LOVE: Claudette Colbert, Fred Mac- 
Murray— Everyone went wild for this. If they were all 
as good as this, wouldn't this be one great business. 
Played Wednesday, May 24.— Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, 
Overseas, APO 887. Military patronage. 



40 



. . . the original exhibitors' reports department, established October 14, 1916. In it 
theatremen serve one another with information about the box-office performance of 
product — providing a service of the exhibitor for the exhibitor. ADDRESS REPORTS: 
What the Picture Did for Me, Motion Picture Herald. Rockefeller Center, New York 20. 



SO PROUDLY WE HAIL: Paulette Goddard, Veroni- 
ca Lake — It must have been good for an audience to sit 
in an auditorium for two hours with the temperature 
almost 95 degrees. Very good picture but in my opinion 
it was slightly long. Played Sunday, May 28. — Sgt. Wm. 
E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. Military patronage. 

SUBMARINE ALERT: Richard Arlen, Wendy Barrie 

— Paramount, please — no more like this. Flayed Sunday, 

May 21— Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 
Military patronage. -J 

SULLIVANSv THE: Anne Baxter, Thomas Mitchell- 
Fox did make a good one this time. \ But I can't see 
why they had to give it a depressing ending. Why not 
carry the comedy through. Acting fine and business 
good. Played Sunday, Monday, June 11, 12. — F. R. Crist, 
Crist Theatre, Loveland, O. Small town patronage. • 

UNINVITED, THE: Ray Milland, Ruth Hussey— An- 
other dialogue picture. Scenes taken in an old house. 
Very dark picture; nothing there to cost* very much. 
The same old story. A "C" in top allocation. I feel 
like I havC been gypped. Played Friday, Saturday, June 
9, 10.— F. R. Crist, Crist Theatre; Loveland, O. Small 
town patronage. \ 



Republic 



IN OLD OKLAHOMA: John Wayne, Martha Scott— 
This was a very good picture. All of our customers en- 
joyed this one. I have been thinking that we should have 
more like this one and I think Technicolor would have 
been very good on this picture. Played Sunday, Monday, 
June 4, 5. — Bob Neely, Times Theatre, Jonesboro. 111. 
Small town patronage. 

PISTOL PACKIN' MAMA: Ruth Terry, Bob Living- 
ston — Just right for my town. Did extra business. — L. G. 
Tewksbury, Opera House Theatre, Stonington, Maine. 
Small town patronage. 



RKO 



ACTION IN ARABIA: George Sanders, Virginia Bruce 
—This is the worst picture we have played in years. 
There is about five minutes of action in it. Skip it. 
Played Friday, Saturday, June 16, 17. — J. H. Bustin, Im- 
perial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. 

AROUND THE WORLD: Kay Kyser, Joan Davis— 
This is one of the best musicals that we have played for 
some time. All of our audience enjoyed it and we were 
very well pleased with the box office receipts. Play it if 
you haven't. Played Friday, Saturday, June 17, 18. — Bob 
Neely, Times Theatre, Jonesboro, 111. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

AROUND THE WORLD: Kay Kyser, Joan Davis— 
This feature drew a better than average crowd and seemed 
to please 100%. Joan Davis drew most of the laughs. 
Fine escapist picture. — L. G. Tewksbury, Opera House 
Theatre, Stonington, Maine. Small town patronage. 

BEHIND THE RISING SUN: Tom Neal, Margo— First 
night business was grand and comments from patrons 
were "Good Show." but business was so low second night 
I just wondered if they really thought it was good, as 
comment first night always affects second night and this 
did not prove to help me any. Played Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, June 7, 8. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena 
Vista, Ga. 

FALCON OUT WEST: Tom Conway, Barbara Hale— 
These Falcon pictures are always good. Patrons pleased. 
Flayed Friday, Saturday, May 12, 13.— J. H. Bustin, Im- 
perial Theatre, Windsor, . Nova Scotia, Canada. Small 
town patronage. 

GILDERSLEEVE ON BROADWAY: Harold Perry, 
Billie Burke — Used this on a double bill with Tarzan s 
Desert Mystery. Had several walkouts but there were 
many laughs by those who remained. Played Friday, 
Saturday, June 9, 10.— A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, 
Scotia, Calif. Small lumber town. 

HIGHER AND HIGHER: Frank Sinatra, Michele Mor- 
gan — Not a bad picture. Sinatra might be able to sing 
but we would rather heat" Bing Crosby any day. Played 
Wednesday, Thursday, May 10, 11.— J. ,H. Bustin, Im- 
perial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada..., Small 
town patronage. 

TARZAN'S DESERT MYSTERY: Johnny Weismuller, 
Nancy Kelly— The Tarzan fans turned' out '.in good num- 
bers to see this episode and every one apparently was sat- 



isfied there being no complaint or walkouts Played Fri- 
day, ■ Saturday, June 9, 10. — A. S. Ed,wards, Winema 
Theatre, Scotia, Calif. Small lumber town. 

UP IN ARMS: Danny Kaye, Dinah' Shore— Kaye is 
versatile in his impersonations; I suppose that he Tanks 
as a top comedian. It is light entertainment, but, at that, 
I noticed some restlessness in the audience as the picture 
progressed. I think it was a case of just a little too much 
of Kaye.— A: E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia 
Theatre, Gojumbia City* Ind. / r 

Twentieth Century- Fox 

BUFFALO BILL: Joel McCrea, Maureen O'Hara— This 
picture is all you exhibitors could ask for — color, action, 
history — and the folks turned out big in this college town. 
Also 100% for. farmers. Played Sunday-Tuesday, June 11, 
13.— Ken Gorham, Town Hal] Theatre, Middlebury, Vt. 
Rural patronage. 

GUADALCANAL DIARY: William Bendix, Preston 
Foster^Fine action picture that pleased practically all, 
although we still get complaints about booking war pic- 
tures. Running about 93 min. Played Wednesday, May 
10.— Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 1 887. Military 
patronage. 

GANG'S ALL HERE, THE:. Alice Faye, Carmen Mi- 
randa—Very few comments from my customers which is 
unusual, and as for myself, it is one of the poorest I have 
ever seen Alice Faye in. Very few laughs. And the scen- 
ery was very much overdone. On the whole was very 
poor. Flayed Sunday, Monday, June 18,19.— Bob Neely, 
Times Theatre, Jonesboro, 111. Small town patronage. 

GANG'S ALL HERE: Alice Faye, Carmen Miranda- 
Business was below capacity, but fair. There were no 
complaints and every one seemed happy at the finish. 
The picture leaned more towards photography than story. 
We were held too far back on playing dates. Played 
Sunday, Monday, June 11, 12.— A. S. Edwards, Winema 
Theatre, Scotia, Calif. Small lumber town. 

LODGER THE: Merle Oberon, George Sanders.— What 
a licking we took with this picture; wish we hadn't 
played it. Played Wednesday, Thursday, June 14, 15.— 
Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont., Canada. 

PARIS AFTER DARK: George Sanders, Brenda Mar- 
shall—This feature flopped miserably. The cast was good 
and their acting very creditable but there was just no 
interest. Therefore, no business. Played Wednesday, 
Thursday, June 7, 8.— A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, 
Scotia, Calif. Small lumber town. 

THE PURPLE HEART: Dana Andrews, Richard Conte 
— Our crowd a little disappointed and some who saw it 
wished they had not but still a great picture and worth 
your best playing time. Played Sunday-Tuesday, June 
4-6.— Ken Gorham, Town Hall Theatre, Middlebury. Vt. 
Action lovers patronage. 

THE PURPLE HEART: Dana Andrews, Richard Conte 
— Almost all of this picture was taken in a court room. 
Not a bad piece of work; my patrons were pleased. 
Played Monday, Tuesday, May 8, 9.— J. H. Bustin, Im- 
perial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. Small 
town patronage. 

SWEET ROSIE 0*GRADY: Betty Grable, Robert 
Young — Very nice picture, nice color, good comedy. Play 
it. Flayed Wednesday, Thursday, June 7, 8. — J. H. Bus- 
tin, Imperial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. 
Small town patronage. 

SWING OUT THE BLUES: Bob Haymes, Lynn Mer- 
rick — Has appeal to younger set. Business fair. Played 
Sunday, June 11. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Til- 
bury, Ont., Canada. 

TAMPICO: Lynn Bari, Edward G. Robinson— Just an- 
other picture. Allocated too high. Double-bill it. Flayed 
Tuesday, June 13— F. R. Crist, Crist Theatre, Loveland, 
O. Small town patronage. 



United Artists 



FALSE COLORS: William Boyd— A very good Hopa- 
long Cassidy western— in fact a(l his outdoor releases are 
well done. Played Friday, -June, 9. — Abe H. Kaufman. 
Fountain Theatre, Terre Haute, Ind'. Family patronage. 

RIDERS OF THE DEADLINE: William Boyd— Good 
western; country people go for these. Played Friday, Sat- 

(Continued on opposite page) 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



(Continued from opposite page) 
-urday. Tune 9, 10. — J. H. Bustin, Imperial Theatre, Wind- 
sor, Nova Scotia, Canada. Small town patronage. 

THAT NAZTY NUISANCE: Bobby Watson, Joe Dev- 
lin — Nice little comedy. It was too short. Played Wednes- 
day, Thursday, June 14, 15.— F. R. Crist, Crist Theatre, 
Loveland, O. Small town patronage. 



Universal 

ALI BABA AND THE 40 THIEVES: Jon Hall, Marie 
Montez — Although a top picture, it failed to do little bet- 
-ter than average business. We feel although lavishly 
produced, its box office potentialities were missing. Played 
Monday, Tuesday, June 12, 13. — Harland Rankin, Plaza 
Theatre, Tilbury! Ont., Canada. 

ALI BABA AND THE 40 THIEVES: Marie Montez, 
Jon Hall — Many good remarks about this picture. Beau- 
tiful colors. Played Monday, Tuesday, June 12, 13. — J. H. 
Bustin, Imperial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. 
Small town patronage. 

COBRA WOMAN: Jon Hall. Marie Montez— The Navy 
12 Boys went for this in a big way but did not appeal 
too much to the locals. Maria Montez is gorgeous in 
color, and good business can be expected in most spots. 
Played Sunday-Tuesday, June 18-20. — Ken Gorham, Town 
Hall Theatre, Middlebury, Vt. General patronage. 

HERS TO HOLD: Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten — 
Here is a fine picture that everyone enjoyed. Not a com- 
plaint on this picture. Played Sunday, May 14. — Sgt. 
Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. Military patronage. 

HIS BUTLER'S SISTER: Deanna Durbin, Franchot 
Tone. — A wonderful picture, nice singing and comedy. 
Worth playing. Flayed Monday, Tuesday, June 6, 7. — J. 
H. Bustin, Imperial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Can- 
ada. Small town patronage. 

IMPOSTER, THE: Gene Gabin, AUyn Joslyn— Patrons 
didn't care much for this picture; not much action in it. 
Played Monday, Tuesday, May 29. 30.— J. H. Bustin, Im- 
perial Theatre, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada. Small 
town patronage. 

TOP MAN: Donald O'Connor, Susan Foster— Nice pro- 
gram that enjoyed good week, and patronage much 
pleased. Played Friday, Saturday. June 16, 17.— Harland 
Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont., Canada. 



Warner Bros. 

PRINCESS O'ROURJCE: Oliva De HaviUand, Robert 
Cummings— I thought I was going to have good box office 
on this one. but was just fair. My patrons said was good. 
The public as a whole are so troubled now, you never 
know what reaction will come. Played Monday, Tuesday, 
June 5. 6. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena 
Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

SONG OF THE SADDLE: Dick Foran— Very good 
western, even though a reissue; would like to see War- 
ners reissue some of those good Joe Brown pictures they 
made a few years ago, also the Roaring 20"s, Angels with 
Dirtv Faces, Invisible Stripes, They Drive by Night, Tor- 
rid Zone, and Fighting 69th. I note in this week's "Her- 
ald" that they are intending to reissue Manpower— this 
wasn't a box office when we first piayed it — Robinson was 
always at his best in Gangster pictures (at B. O.), so 
give us some of these Robinson reissues. Played Wednes- 
day, June 14.— Abe H. Kaufman, Fountain Theatre, Terre 
Haute, Ind. Family patronage. 

UNCERTAIN GLORY: Errol Flynn, Paul Lucas— Good 
picture. It has a logical story of the French Under- 
ground. It carries suspense and some action. It is need- 
less to repeat so often pictures of this type; do less than 
normal business, as all the pictures that even remotely 
touch war do. — A. E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Col- 
umbia City, Ind. 

WATCH ON THE RHINE: Bette Davis, Paul Lucas— 
Bette Davis draws out some customers that you only get 
once in a while. Good business. Divided reaction. — L. G. 
Tewksbury, Opera House, Stonington, Maine. Small town 
patronage. 



Short Features 
Columbia 

ALOUETTE: Community sing — Includes "Don't get 
I around much anymore" and others. Pretty good short. — 
Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 

BLITZ ON THE BLITZ: All star comedies— Our pa- 
trons love these comedies and ask for more. Some of the 
shorts are much better than the features that have to 
run. — Bob Neely, Times Theatre, Jonesboro, 111. 

COMMUNITY SING: Community Sing — This is a 
drawing card for our midnight shows. Mostly the younger 
generation attendance. They are the ones that sing the 
most. More of these. — Bob Neely, Times Theatre, Jones- 
boro, 111. 

JOURNEY TO DEHALI: Tours— Good travelogue, wen 
received. —Harland Rankin, Flaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont., 
Canada. 

POLLY WANTS A DOCTOR: Phantasies Cartoons- 
Very good. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, 
Ont., Canada. 

YOKES ON ME: All star comedies— This is what our 
patrons like. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, 
Ont., Canada. 



SHORT PRODUCT 
ON BROADWAY 



Week of June 26 

ASTOR 

Movie Pests MGM 

Feature: Bathing Beauty MGM 

CRITERION 

Foster's Canary College Univ. 

Feature: Christmas Holiday. . . . Univ. 

GLOBE 

Million Dollar Cat MGM 

The Swooner Crooner Vitaphone 

Features: Roger Touhy, Gangster . 20th Cent.-Fox 
Attack OWI-RKO 

GOTHAM 

The Kid in Upper 4 MGM 

Features: It Happened Tomorrow . United Artists 
Attack OWI-RKO 

HOLLYWOOD 

Roaming Through Arizona MGM 

Our Frontier in Italy Vitaphone 

Russian Rhapsody Vitaphone 

Feature: Mr. Skeffington Warner Bros. 

PARAMOUNT 

And to Think I Saw It on 

Mulberry Street Paramount 

Trail Breakers Paramount 

Wnusual Occupations Paramount 

Why Daddy MGM 

Feature: Going My Way Paramount 

RIALTO 

Patrolling the Ether MGM 

Feature: Invisible Man's Revenge. Universal 

RIVOLI 

Your Pet Problem Paramount 

Feature: Story of Dr. Wassell .. Paramount 

ROXY 

Eliza on the Ice 20th Cent.-Fox 

Nymphs of the Lake 20th Cent.-Fox 

Somewhere in U.S. A MGM 

Feature: Home in Indiana 20th Cent.-Fox 

STRAND 

The Immortal Blacksmith MGM 

Winner's Circle Vitaphone 

Filipino Sports Parade Vitaphone 



Feature: The Mask of Dimitrios .Warner Bros. 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

CUBAN RHYTHM: Pete Smith Specialties— Very good 
short teaching dancing. — Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, 
APO 887. 

FORGOTTEN TREASURE: Passing Parade— Very good 
short on historic film. — Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, 
APO 887. 

THROUGH THE COLORADO: Fitzpatrick Travel talks 
— This was indeed one of the nicest travel talks we have 
had for some time. Our customers enjoy these very 
much. — Bob Neely, Times Theatre, Jonesboro, 111. 



Paramount 

HIKE OR BIKE: Sportlights— Very good short, and in- 
teresting. — Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 

IN THE DESERT: Speaking of Animals— Pretty good 
although there isn't much to it. Another in the series of 
giving voices to animals. — Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Over- 
seas, APO 887. 

IN THE NEWS REEL: Speaking of Animals— This 
reel has a consistently high level of entertainment value. 
Done entirely within the animal kingdom, through a 
hilarious speaking technique; it was very cleverly done. 
— Bob Neely, Times Theatre, Jonesboro, 111. 



Twentieth Century- Fox 

CLIMBING PEAKS: Newscameraman — Adventures of 
Newsreel Cameraman; fair scenic picture. — Sgt. Wm. E. 
Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 



HELICOPTER: Terrytoons— Timely, good, most inter- 
esting. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont., 
Canada. 

SHOW BUSINESS AT WAR: March of Time— Excel- 
lent — a tribute to a great industry. Was proud to show 
this short.— Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 

Universal 

RUSSIAN REVELS: Musicals— Just where did they ex- 
pect this to do business? Is there such a place? Stay 
away from this unless you have a Russian audience. — 
Sgt. Wm. E. Goewey, Overseas, APO 887. 

Vitaphone 

DIVIDE AND CONQUER: Broadway Brevity— Instruc- 
tive, well worth playing. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, 
Tilbury, Ont., Canada. 



Cleveland Houses Resume 
10-Cent Child Scale 

A majority of Cleveland neighborhood theatres 
have reduced their child admission prices from 12 
to 10 cents. The 10-cent scale was changed to 12 
cents April 1 to cover the Federal admission amuse- 
ment tax. The resumption of the 10-cent admission 
for children under 12 years of age was resumed 
when the office of the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue issued a ruling to M. B. Horwitz, general 
manager of the Washington Circuit, which provides 
that the established child admission price of less 
than 10 cents is not subject to the Federal tax, 
provided a breakdown of the price is advertised at 
the box office. 

In Cleveland, where the theatres are subject to 
a three per cent state tax, the child established ad- 
mission price is .097, the state tax is .003, making a 
total admission of 10 cents. 

At first, exhibitors said that the Federal tax did 
not affect business. After a two-month trial, they 
have reversed their original statement. The tax has 
hurt business, they claim, and the extra two cents 
on child admissions has been particularly harmful. 

Fifty County Fairs Are 
Set for Pennsylvania 

More than 50 expositions are scheduled, accord- 
ing to listings compiled by the State Department 
of Agriculture, for the 1944 Pennsylvania County 
and Community Agricultural Fair, which will open 
early in August and continue into December. The 
Bedford Fair starts the season August 8 to 12, 
and the Pittsburgh Baby Beef Show will bring it 
to a close December 11 to 13. 

War conditions, chiefly gasoline rationing, have 
influenced many fair associations against holding 
their events this year, as they did last year. Out 
of approximately 120 county and community fair 
associations in the state, 54 have scheduled fairs 
for this season compared with 50 scheduled last 
year, when only 42 actually were conducted. There 
were 63 fairs held in 1942. 

Among those not participating this year in the 
fair field are such popular expositions as the 
Reading Fair, where the Army is using the build- 
ings ; the Mansfield and the Clearfield, Fayette, 
McKean, Somerset, Union, and Washington Coun- 
ty Fairs. Lycoming County has made no de- 
cision to date. 

Manpower Crisis Delays 
Planned Coast Houses 

The manpower situation has seriously slowed 
down wartime theatre construction on the west 
coast and a number of applications for new houses 
in congested war industry areas have been held up 
by the War Production Board. Among the ap- 
plications for which the WPB is not expected to 
give approval until the labor situation has eased 
are those of Fox West Coast and several filed by 
independent exhibitors. 



Cabot Leaves Air Force 

Lieut. Bruce Cabot, who enlisted in the Army 
Air Transport Command in January, 1942, and 
who has seen service on various fighting fronts, 
has left the Army to resume his acting contrast with 
Paramount. His last screen role was "The Desert 
Song" for Warner Bros., on loan from Paramount. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



41 

4 



4< 



PICTURE 
CROSSES 



A statistical compilation and 
comparison of Box-Office Per- 
formance in first-run theatres 



Figures directly below picture title compare dollar gross with average gross and show rela- 
tive percentage of all engagements tabulated. 

Figures opposite theatre names represent percentage of tabulated grosses to average weekly 
business based on the six months' period ending April 30, 1944. 

SYMOLS: (DB) Double Bill— associate feature title; (SA) Stage Attraction; (MO) Move-Over 
Run; (AA) Advance Admission. 

INDEX: Over-all performance percentage figures from previously published final reports 
appear in Service Data section of Product Digest. See last column of Release Chart for Index. 



LOS ANGELES — Loew's State .- 112 8% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES — Uptown 94 3% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

NEW YORK— Palace, 1st week 116.3% 

NEW YORK— Palace, 2nd week 112.0% 

NEW YORK — Palace, 3rd week 86.2% 

NEW YORK— Palace, 4th week 81.9% 

PROVIDENCE— RKO Albee, 1st week 140.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

PROVIDENCE — RKO 1 Albee, 2nd week .... 120.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

ST. LOUIS— Ambassador 96.1% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 



PiN UP GIRL (20th-Fox) 

Final Reports: 

Total Gross Tabulated 
Comparative Average Gross 
Over-all Performance 



$695,100 
643,800 
107.9% 



BALTIMORE— New, 1st week 122.8% 

BALTIMORE— New, 2nd week 110.1% 

BALTIMORE— New, 3rd week 110.1% 

BOSTON— Metropolitan 92.8% 

(DB) Men in White (MGM) 

BUFFALO— Great Lakes, 1st week 94.8% 

(DB) The Chinese Cat (Mono.) 

BUFFALO— Great Lakes, 2nd week 68.5% 

(DB) The Chinese Cat (Mono.) 

CHICAGO— State Lake 88.4% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Palace 101.9% 

CINCINNATI— RKO' Shubert, MO 1st week . . . 105.2% 

INDIANAPOLIS— Indiana 97.6% 

(DB) Ladies in Washington (20th- Fox) 

INDIANAPOLIS— Lyric, MO 1st week 90.4% 

(DB) Ladies in Washington (20th-Fox) 

KANSAS CITY— Esquire 94.1% 

KANSAS CITY— Uptown 78.5% 

LOS ANGELES— Carthay Circle 105.7% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th-Fox) 

LOS ANGELES— Chinese 111.1% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th -Fax) 

LOS ANGELES — Loew's State 119.3% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th -Fox) 

LOS ANGELES— Uptown 103.7% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th -Fox) 

MILWAUKEE— Wisconsin 106.2% 

(DB) Bermuda Mystery (20th-Fox) 

MINNEAPOLIS— Radio City 86.6% 

MINNEAPOLIS— Century. MO 1st week .... 84.5% 

NEW YORK— Roxy, 1st week 105.8% 

(SA) Connie Boswell, Raymond Scott's Orch. 

NEW YORK— Roxy, 2nd week 88.2% 

(SA) Connie Boswell, Raymond Scott's Orch. 

NEW YORK— Roxy, 3rd week 72.9% 

(SA) Connie Boswell, Raymond Scott's Orch. 

PHILADELPHIA— Stanley, 1st week 137.5% 

PHILADELPHIA— Stanley, 2nd week 76.0% 

PROVIDENCE— Majestic, 1st week 118.1% 

(DB) Tampico (20th-Fox) 

PROVIDENCE— Majestic, 2nd week 86.6% 

(DB) Tampico (20th-Fox) 

PROVIDENCE— Fav's, MO 1st week /3.5% 

(DB) Tampico (20th-Fox) 

SAN FRAN CISCO- Fox 112.8% 

(DB) Henry Aldrich Plays Cupid (Para.) 

SAN FRANCISCO— State, MO' 1st week .... 118.8% 

(DB) Henry Aldrich Plays Cupid (Para.) 

SEATTLE — Fifth Avenue 

ST. LOUIS— Fox, 1st week 103./ A 

(DB) Bermuda Mystery (20th-Fox) 

ST. LOUIS— Fox, 2nd week y - y/o 

(DB) Bermuda Mystery (20th-Fox) 

WASHINGTON— Palace /5 - u70 



ONCE UPON A TIME (Cel.) 

First Reports: 

Total Gross Tabulated 
Comparative Average Gross 
Over-all Performance 



$178,100 
175,600 
101.4% 



BUFFALO— Lafayette 97.8% 

(DB) Is Everybody Happy (Col.) 

DENVER— Denver 60.0% 

(DB) Knickerbocker Holiday (UA) 

DENVER— Esquire 74.4% 

(DB) Knickerbocker Holiday (UA) 

DENVER— Rialto, MO 1st week 112.7% 

(DB) Knickerbocker Holiday (UA) 

KANSAS CITY— Midland 98.2% 

LOS ANGELES— Hillstreet 115.7% 

(DB) Girl in the Case (Col.) 

LOS ANGELES— Pantages 124.2% 

(DB) Girl in the Case (Col.) 



42 



MILWAUKEE— Palace 

(DB) The Heat's On (Col.) 
OMAHA— Brandeis 

(DB) Nine Girls (Col.) 

PITTSBURGH— Harris 

SAN FRANCISCO— Orpheum, 1st week 

(DB) Swing Out the Blues (Col.) 
SAN FRANCISCO— Orpheum, 2nd week 

(DB) Swing Out the Blues (Col.) 
SAN FRANCISCO— Orpheum. 3rd week 

(DB) Swing Out the Blues (Col.) 



97.4% 
134.6% 



109.1% 
119.3% 



109.0% 
77.4% 



THE LADY AND THE MONSTER (Rep.) 

Intermediate Reports: 

Total Gross Tabulated $121,700 
Comparative Average Gross I 19,900 

Over-all Performance 101.5% 



BALTIMORE— Valencia 116 6% 

BOSTON— Translux, 1st week 164 7% 

(DB) The Chinese Cat (Mono.) 
BOSTON— Translux, 2nd week 143.8% 

(DB) The Chinese Cat (Mono.) 
BOSTON-Translux, 3rd week 139.6% 

(DB) The Chinese Cat (Mono.) 
CINCINNATI-RKO Lyric 140.6% 

(DB) The Curse of the Cat People (RKO) 
KANSAS CITY— Tower 122.5% 

(DB) The Monster Maker (PRC) 
LOS ANGELES— Hawaii, 1st week 100.0% 

(DB) Trocadero (Rep.) 
LOS ANGELES— Hawaii, 2nd week 104.8% 

(DB) Trocadero (Rep.) 
LOS ANGELES— Hawaii, 3rd week 64.5% 

(DB) Trocadero (Rep.) 
MILWAUKEE— Alhambra 61.8% 

(DB) Return of the Ape Man (Mono.) 
PITTSBURGH— Fulton ........... 75.5% 

(DB) Weird Woman (Univ.) 
SAN FRANCISCO— Warfield 107.7% 

(SA) Vaudeville 
SEATTLE— Palomar 95.8% 

(SA) Vaudeville 
ST. LOUIS— Missouri 97.3% 

(DB) Follow the Leader (Mono.) 

• 



SHOW BUSINESS (RKO) 

Intermediate Reports: 

Total Gross Tabulated 
Comparative Average Gross 
Over-all Performance 



$362,900 
371,000 
97.8% 



BALTIMORE— Hippodrome, 1st week 104.3% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

BALTIMORE- Hippodrome, 2nd week 96.1% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

BOSTON— Memorial 116.1% 

(DB) The Yellow Canary (RKO) 

BUFFALO— 20th Century 93.1% 

(DB i Escape to Danger (RKO) 

CHICAGO- Palace, 1st week 96.9% 

(DB) Passport to Destiny (RKO) 

CHICAGO— Palace, 2nd week 62.0% 

(DB) Passport to Destiny (RKO) 

CHICAGO— Grand, MO' 1st week 61.2% 

(DB) Passport to Destiny (RKO) 

DENVER— Orpheum 101.5% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

DENVER— Broadway. MO' 1st week 85.3% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

KANSAS CITY- Orpheum. 1st week 104.1% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

KANSAS CITY— Orpheum, 2nd week ' 97.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES— Carthay Circle 90.3% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES— Chinese 91.5% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 



I 



i 



i EST 



Coast Units Query 
Alliance Position 

A meeting of 900 delegates from 17 industry 
unions was to be conducted Wednesday night in 
the Hollywood Women's Club by the Emergency 
Committee of Hollywood Guilds and Unions. 
Three main points were on the agenda : 

"1) To establish adequate public relations; 

"2) To affirm and extend the patriotic war ac- 
tivities of the industry, and 

"3) To put on record the Motion Picture Al- 
liance and to end the attacks of this group, to ex- 
pose its techniques and to inform delegates in de- 
tail of its workings." 

In a letter to Sam Wood, president of the 
Alliance, and to James K. McGuinness, executive 
chairman, the Emergency Committee last week J Q| 
asked nine questions and requested the Alliance to 
send a representative to answer them. 

Mr. McGuinness charged the letter had appeared 
in the news and advertising columns of the public 
press- before he or Mr. Wood received a copy, i 
Replying formally to the Emergency Committee's 
letter Monday, he said the Alliance would not send 
a representative to the meeting but it was ready 
to meet with any "responsible group" on equal 
terms and on a basis of fair play. 

The questions were : 

"1. In view of your statement that the Motion 
Picture Alliance believes itself to represent the 
vast majority of the people who serve this great 
medium of expression, how many of Hollywood's 
30,000 workers are enrolled members of your or- 
ganization? 

"2. Since certain active leaders of the Motion 
Picture Alliance have in the past openly opposed 
trade union organization and boasted of union- 
wrecking activities, why should not the Motion 
Picture Alliance be regarded as anti-labor? 

"3. Despite your assertion that your organiza- 
tion is non-political, do not your leaders participate 
in political activities as official representatives of 
the Motion Picture Alliance? 

"4. In consideration of the many protestations 
of patriotism by the Motion Picture Alliance, ex-» 
plain your omission of any reference to (a) the { 
need for national unity and (b) the urgency of^ 
collaboration with our Allies to insure a speedy 1 
victory and a lasting peace? 

"5. What organization or individuals outside 
the Motion Picture Alliance share your contention 
that there is a 'widespread impression that this 
industry is made up of and dominated by Com- 
munists, radicals and crackpots?' 

"6. In view of your assertion that you find 
yourselves 'in sharp revolt against a rising tide 
of Communism, Fascism and kindred beliefs', 
which motion pictures in the opinion of the Alli- 
ance have contained such propaganda? 

"7. Which producers or producing companies — } 
these having sole control of the content of motion 
pictures — does Motion Picture Alliance hold re- 
sponsible for the propaganda it professes to have 
discovered? 

"8. Why have the public or publicized addressesi 
of the Motion Picture Alliance representatives de- 
voted so little attention to the menace of Fascism ? 

"9. By its highly publicized meetings and un- 
substantiated accusations, thereby increasing 'the 
widespread impression' it assertedly was formed to 
correct, does not the Motion Picture Alliance un- 
dermine the unity of the motion picture industry; 
behind the war effort?" 



CO)! 

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( 

Sals 

ifre 
ill i 

|e, 
rfage 
irucl 

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Warners to Operate Two 

Warner Bros. Theatres will assume operatior 
of the Strand and Victor theatres in Pittstown 
Pa., October 1. The houses had been leased b)E 
William Goldman. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, I94'|I0N| 



I 




{n international association of showmen meeting weekly 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD for mutual aid and progress 



ESTER FRIEDMAN, Editor 



GERTRUDE MERRIAM, Associate Editor 



OP 



an 



dalism 



After almost two years, the vandalism problem which has been 
; costly and annoying to exhibitors and theatre managers seems 
nearer to a permanent solution. 

v'arious expedients which were introduced by ingenious theatre- 
rn in the hope of diverting the destructive leanings of adolescents 
oved only temporarily effective or totally inadequate. 

Mot even in communities where curfews were imposed by aroused 
cials has there been any noticeable improvement. The youngsters 
pear -to fake a greater enjoyment in despoiling public as well as 
;atre property during those hours when they are free to move 
out without restraint. 

vlaking friends with the ringleaders, an innovation introduced 
-he Boston area a few months ago by some of the theatre 
nagers, had its repercussion recently with one of the most 
;tructive outbreaks ever visited upon houses in that section. 
Every parent who has had a hand in rearing his offspring knows 
- the most effective form of punishment to be meted out is 
deprive an erring youngster of some cherished privilege. 

All children love movies. No matter how thoughtless or mis- 
-evous a child might be, if theatre admission was denied him 
' any protracted period it is more than likely he would be willing 
make whatever personal sacrifice would be necessary in order 
regain the good graces of theatre management and the privi- 
^e of reentry. 

After two years, the average manager should be able to recog- 
•2 the youths who are responsible and who are most frequently 
cause of hoodlum outbreaks and vandalism. 

ii is about time sufficient pressure was brought to bear to per- 
rently bar as many of these delinquents from the theatres as 
can. If their associates do not then take the warning, they too 

..uld be barred from admission. 

■ I AAA 



eep 'Em Buying 



. Despite the fine record of Bond sales rolled up by theatremen 
-the "Fighting Fifth" Loan Campaign, even greater effort is 

•ded to back the armies engaged on the many battlefronts. 
i here is still time to set in a War Bond premiere. For those 

3 have not already arranged to promote Free Movie Day, it is 
too late to participate in this important reinforcement in con- 

ttion with the national date, July 6. 



GOOD LUCK, JOE 

The promotion and transfer of Joseph G. Samartano from 
manager of Loew's Poli theatre, Meriden, Conn., to Loew's 
State in Providence, R. I., was announced last week by J. R. 
Vogel, operating head for the circuit's out-of-town theatres. 

Mr. Samartano's good fortune is especially gratifying to 
the membership of the Round Table. Since early in 1937, 
shortly after assuming the managerial reins at Meriden, when, 
he joined the ranks of the world's largest organization of 
showmen, Mr. Samartano has been one of its most faithful 
and loyal contributors. 

His exploitation endeavors, as well as his activities in 
behalf of the war effort, have been regularly reported in 
these pages. Needless to say, there have been many other 
showmen who have benefited as a result of his experience. 

A half-column story on the front page of the Meriden 
Record was not sufficient to tell of Mr. Samartano's accom- 
plishments in the city; an additional column was necessary 
on page three in order to express the townspeople's affection 
for the departing theatreman. 

As past-president of the local Kiwanis and an active mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and other civic organiza- 
tions, he sowed the seeds of fellowship and displayed a 
degree of business acumen which made an indelible impres- 
sion on the community. 

Meriden will miss him, but surely the entire community will 
be proud of his advancement. 

Providence, R. I., will soon learn of Mr. Samartano. The 
Round Table will continue to hear from him with bigger 
exploitation data. 



Manager-Columnist 

Sid Dickler, manager of the Belmar theatre, Pittsburgh, who 
has been a consistent contributor to these pages lately, is a 
recently discharged Army veteran who with a few weeks' training 
under Lige Brien proved sufficiently capable of assuming manage- 
ment of the Belmar theatre in Pittsburgh. 

One of Sid's former vocations was newspaper work, a trade 
which he is currently turning to good advantage. 

The lack of space forced one of the local papers to discontinue 
free art layout, hk offered to write a column for the editor. His 
column is called "Scouting Hollywood", and not only does he get 
to plug his attractions but also rates a byline. 

—CHESTER FRIEDMAN 



,JON PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



42 



INSTITUTIONAL ADVERTISING] 




Right, Harry Boe- 
sel, manager of 
the Wisconsin 
theatre in Mil- 
waukee, pub- 
licized M-G-M's 
20th Anniversary 
with this distinc- 
tive lobby dis- 
play. At left, 
Homer McCal- 
lon celebrated 
the occasion at 
Loew's State, 
Houston, with 
this huge birth- 
day cake dis- 
played in the 
lobby. 




Through courtesy of Station WSAY, Lester Pollock at 
Loew's theatre in Rochester, N. Y., set up an Invasion News 
Flash Board in his lobby. Bulletins were added constantly. 




Manager Walter Ahrens, Orpheum, Des Moines, lined 
up several of these flashy window tieups for 
"Cover Girl ". 




J. Knox Strachan, ad head for Warner's, Cleveland, promoted t 
news distributor trucks to plug "Follow the Boys" engagement at| 
Hippodrome theatre. 




44 



Charles Ramb, manager of the Capitol, Philadelphia, exploited "Lad} 
the Monster" with this eye-arresting front. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD. JULY I 




litation is very much alive in Bombay, India. Here's 
a local theatre manager got around ban on autos 
plugged "Tarzan Triumphs". 




attractive setpiece in the lobby of Loew's, 
ester, N. Y., called patron attention to the 
engagement of "Tars and Spars", for 
ier Les Pollock. 




In Montevideo, Uruguay, showmen have also learned to benefit from 
window promotions. Here's a nice layout exploiting "China" at the 
Coventry theatre, there. 




Leon Lewis attracted attention to his "Battle of the Western Stars" pro- 
gram with this smart front at the New Liberty in Fort Worth, Texas. 





Hoel, publicity director for the Harris theatre, Pittsburgh, 
wed the county's covered wagon and horses for an out- 
ballyhoo on "Buffalo Bill". 



Bill Hoyle, Lincoln, Washington, D. C, used indirect light- 
ing to bring out enlargements of "Marseille" leads seen 
through simulated portholes. 



©ERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY I, 1944 



45 



Exploiting the New Films 



UNDERGROUND GUERRILLAS 

"D" Day and the tremendous public interest 
and demand for newspaper reports of the Allies' 
progress led to a neat promotion by Bill Brown, 
manager of the Poli-Bijou theatre in New 
Haven, in behalf of his current screen attrac- 
tion "Underground Guerrillas." 

With all newspapers screaming news of the 
Invasion, Brown made several unsuccessful at- 
tempts to buy 1,000 local copies which he hoped 
to over-imprint in red with copy of the picture 
and theatre name. He finally connected with 
the New Haven Register and by rapid coordi- 
nation had the completed stunt out on the 
streets just 35 minutes after the noon edition 
came off the paper's presses. 

Three newsboys barking "Extra ! All about 
the Invasion," distributed the papers at impor- 
tant street intersections. 

Brown also employed a man dressed in ap- 
propriate military garb complete with rifle, 
cartridge belt, etc., to walk the streets carry- 
ing a 30 by 40 sign plugging the picture. This 
ballyhoo attracted considerable attention every- 
where the man appeared. 

Another device used by Brown was a circus 
herald on the attraction. 5,000 of these were 
imprinted and distributed house-to-house and 
in parked cars. 

ONCE UPON A TIME 

An effective advertising and exploitation 
campaign was put over by publicity director 
Bill Brereton and manager George H. Mc- 
Kenna of the Lafayette theatre in Buffalo, 
N. Y., in conjunction with the recent engage- 
ment of "Once Upon a Time." 

Art material and feature stories were planted 
in all local daily newspapers as well as special 
material which broke in the roto-section of the 
Sunday edition. . 

Complete radio coverage was accorded the 
picture with spot announcements over Stations 
WGR, WKBW and WBNY for five days in 




Sam Gilman, manager of Loew's Regent, Har- 
risburg, Pa., located this three-seater bicycle 
and utilized it to exploit current screen attrac- 
tion, "Two Girls and a Sailor," with this smart 
street ballyhoo. 



How the recent pictures are being sold 
the first run and pre-release date showin 



advance of the opening. Additionally, Bill 
Brereton was interviewed by Foster Brooks 
on "Melody Inc.," a sustaining feature of WGR 
with questions pertinent to the film. On the 
same station, Billie Keaton awarded guest 
tickets to listeners who competed in a limerick 
contest, with full . theatre credits, in advance. 

An important Polish newspaper which is 
published in the city, ran a preview strip and 
devoted a full page layout to the attraction. 
An over-sized lobby display was set in a con- 
spicuous location well in advance. Twenty- 
two 24-sheets and 75 window cards were spot- 
ted in choice locations about the city; a fleet of 
taxi cabs carried special insert cards plugging 
the date ; a promotion with the largest public 
library in Buffalo resulted in the distribution 
of 2,000 bookmarks with picture and theatre 
imprint and a fleet of local trucks was ban- 
nered with tiein copy. 

Several window tieups were consummated 
with department stores, beauty shops and jew- 
elry stores with two of the cooperating mer- 
chants paying costs for co-op display ads. 

THE GOOD OLD DAYS 

To publicize the engagement of "The Good 
Old Days" at the Warner Strand theatre in 
Staunton, Va., manager Ed Purcell received 
generous cooperation from local newspapers. 

Both the Staunton Leader and the Evening 
Leader devoted advance and current stories in 
connection with local points of interest tied 
in with the picture theme. They also brought 
to light many old and rare photographs of the 
city, which Purcell built into an attractive lob- 
by display. 

The city mayor, William A. Grubert, loaned 
his high wheel bicycle to the theatre and posed 
for pictures which were published in the dailies. 
During the current engagement the bike was 
exhibited in front of the theatre. 

Five 24-sheets were posted on the main high- 
ways leading to the city; window cards were 
spotted in prominent locations and several mer- 
chants devoted window displays to old-fashioned 
garments, with theatre and film credits. 

Radio spot announcements were used in ad- 
vance and currently over WSVA. On Satur- 
day prior to opening die-cut handlebar mus- 
taches were distributed to the kiddies, bearing 
the theatre imprint and news carriers wore 
them as they delivered their papers, attracting 
considerable attention. 

Bunchez Promotes Space 
In Sports Columns 

Gertrude Bunchez, publicist for Loew's the- 
atres, Baltimore, landed many unusual publicity 
breaks for the attraction's engagement at the 
Valencia theatre. 

Approaching the local sports editors for free 
picture plugs, Miss Bunchez obtained art and 
feature articles from Carroll Dulaney of the 
News Post, Paul Menton of the Evening Sun 
and Jess Linthicum devoted a half column with 
art to Jack Dempsey and theatre credits in the 
Morning Sun. 

The Sunday American broke a two column 
art layout coincident with the picture opening 
and readers were scored in the Home News, 
Catholic Review and Jewish Times. 

Radio station WCAO came through with six 
free spot announcements and a 15 minute script 
of the film; WITH and WFBR likewise were 




O am Cfe/f ... 
Adolf Hitler 
is mi | uncle 

• ...U/Am O ami /6' 
'me* 



He tw>l mv moflier biiiHj'm; to Ins <»•'•■> 

lie. fell in love Willi me ... fcn sW im" 
lif'e famte <««! Oneblx-.b pe.™ uilai 
liim lfi.lt I u.l.v iinf.lilllful to linn 
vwnto! to nvikr. »i» d mwitow • *>»*>•• 
some.liiiiiq on him ! Antl so I ■!«> <* •"'- 



O-WO ate 

women- bnitjllij wn| mm y •-' 
miif.iv s ,md lhe.i< ive.ii" of • 
iwmei! cve.m»to« si"*' >™ lr: k ] '^"L 

( ^HITLER CAWO 

for .>ll rime: ! 

This advance lobby panel helped to publix 
"The Hitler Gang" for manager Arm 
Keenan, at the Merrimack, Lowell, A;j 



46 



touched for free picture mention and the 1 
credits, while Bill Dwyer, popular sports 
nouncer for WITH and sportscaster 
Fenton of WCBM gave prominent mentio 
the Dempsey-Willard fight depicted in the 
ture with full credits. 

Teaser trailers were shown on the scr! 
of the two local circuit houses in advaj 
5,000 special heralds were distributed on 
picture ; die-cut paper mustaches with th( 
imprint were given away at schools ; hotel 
merchant displays were promoted and 13 
war plants posted advertising for the filri 
bulletin boards and plugged the attraction 
ing lunch periods over the loud speaker sy 

SHOW BUSINESS 



The advertising campaign for "Show P 
ness" engineered by manager David Levin 
publicist Rita Morton at the RKO Albee 
atres in Providence had the advantage of 
eral novel features. 

Regular advertising was started well ii 
vance with underlines employed in newsp 
and transcribed spot announcements plug 
the film on all four local radio stations. 

A tieup was consummated with Planters 
nuts whereby several thousand glassine 
lopes containing nut samples and theatre 
print were distributed by a special bal 
boy wearing a huge paper-maiche peanut 

Fifteen thousand cards imprinted, "Bet< 
Penny . . . 'Show Business' is the best mi 
of the year, etc., etc.," were handed to pa: 
by at busy street corners. Each card 1 
shiny new penny pasted on below the 
catch line. 

Radio station WJAR plugged songs 
the picture on its "Brevity Matinee" broj 
with full theatre credits on the day 1 
opening. 

Five leading downtown restaurants 
menus with picture and theatre imprin 
520 carriers of the bus and trolley system 
posted with car cards. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I 



m t 



fjfe 



DCS 

!j in 



Numerous Bond 
ictivities For 
Fighting 5th" 



War Showmanship Contenders 



The showmen listed below 
war effort. Their material 
War Showmanship Award. 

ROBERT BACHMAN 
Indiana, East Chicago, Ind. 

ANTONIO BALDUCCI 
Regent, Syracuse, N. Y. 

JOSEPH BOYLE 

Broadway, Norwich, Conn. 

LOUIS CHARNINSKY 
Capitol, Dallas, Tex. 

MARLOWE CONNER 
Capitol, Madison, Wis. 

IRA CRAIN 

Capitol, Sioux City, la. 

MOE ESSERMAN 
Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind. 

JACK FOXE 

Loew's, Richmond, Va. 



have contributed and reported on their campaigns to aid the 
is eligible for consideration by the Judges for the Quigley 



BILL HOYLE 

Lichtman, Washington, D. C. 

DOROTHY B. KOPPER 
Palace, Watertown, N. Y. 

BERT LEIGHTON 
Grand, Lancaster, Pa. 

ED MAY 

Opera House, Lexington, Ky. 

LOUIS E. MAYER 

RKO Palace, Cleveland, O. 

RITA MORTON 

RKO Albee, Providence, R. I. 

DAVE PERKINS 
Ritz, Lynd hurst, N.J. 

CHARLES PINCUS 
Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 



ED PURCELL 

Strand, Staunton, Va. 

JOSEPH SAMARTANO 
Loew's, Providence, R. I. 

H. N. SCOTT 
Orpheum, St. Louis, Mo. 

CHUCK SHANNON 
Columbia, Sharon, Pa. 

JAY SOLOMON 

Capitol, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

HARRY D. STEARN 
Manring, Middlesboro, Ky. 

DOUGLAS TAUSSIG 
Bardavon, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

CHARLES B. TAYLOR 
Shea's, Buffalo, N.Y. 



Of no mean proportions was the War Bond 
uction. which was held recently at the Grand 
ieatre in Lancaster, Penna., consisting of 181 
roups of items collected by pupils of the Rey- 
:lds Junior highschool, with Bert Leighton, 
onager of the theatre appointed auction chair- 
|an. 

Over $80,000 in War Bonds were sold by 
le pupils as a result. The kids gathered over 
"0 articles from celebrities and local mer- 
lants ; a gavel autographed and donated by 
;.m Rayburn of the House of Representatives 
rought $5050 in Bonds. A full page ad was 
anted in the local paper with a list of all 
•tides to be auctioned. Admission to the 
action was by Bond purchase only. 

As an incentive to the kids, the Lancaster 
»"ar Bond Committee offered a $100 Bond to 
le student securing the largest number of War 
ond bids ; a $50 Bond to the second highest 
nd a $25 to the third. 

Alan J. Bachrach of the Tivoli, in Washi- 
ngton, D. C, through the cooperation of the 
cntury High School, arranged a special night 
' :th students participating in the rally and the 
:hool orchestra providing the music. 25 girl 
idets handled the Bond selling through the 
udience and the art class of the school pro- 
ided posters for the occasion. 

Learning that a proposed street Bond rally 
■as to be held in Sharon, Penna., Chuck Shan- 
on at Warner's Enright theatre immediately 
->lled Jerry Wald's manager in Erie and com- 
peted arrangements to have the maestro and 
is band appear at the Bond Rally. Front page 
:ory was landed as a result with mention also 
jf the band's appearance at the theatre. 

:stes Awards Guest Tickets 
n Bomber-Mission Contest 

Joes Estes, publicist for the Interstate Cir- 
.jit in San Antonio, Tex., forwards tearsheet 
"■om the Evening News, which featured a 
! omber-Mission contest. Running across the 
Hire top of the page in the daily was a photo 
f a Bomber, with sections marked off on which 
nildren were asked to paste War Stamps. 
Vhen the "mission" was completed and the 
-rawing presented at the Majestic theatre with 
he Stamps, guest tickets were awarded, and 
jie boy or girl qualified for the title of San 
..ntonio Junior Ace. 

I The awarding of official citations, honors and 

• isignias to the boy and girl who complete the 
jjaost "missions" will be made and a special 
now held for the kids. Additional Bomber 
jards are available at any Interstate theatre 
I pon purchase of one or more War Stamps. 

,j Louis E. Mayer at the RKO Palace, Cleve- 
land is holding special Bond Auctions at his 
ouse every Tuesday night. Promoted gifts 
,Te awarded to all Bond purchasers and the 
jj'hows are especially advertised. Volunteer 
■ /orkers distribute pledge cards. 
4 Al Buist at the Rialto, Westfield, N. J., for 
: is Bond Rally got out a special program, en- 
re cost of printing and distributing being cov- 
red by merchant ads. Fifty posters made by 
3 tudents in the high school art classes were 
jj sed about town; copy was carried in the 
aeatre's weekly ad for two weeks and front 
age stories landed in the daily paper. Al held 

• is rally the day before the drive opened and 
•ne sale of Bonds throughout the banks, schools 
nd issuing agents totalled over $1,170,000 

Before checking out of the Poli Palace, in 

MANAGERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY I, 1944 



Meriden, Conn., for the State in Providence, 
R. I., Joe Samartano to open his drive, pre- 
sented an all-service musical revue featuring a 
cast of 132 and starring Sgt. Gene Autry. Com- 
mander Jack Dempsey was presented from the 
theatre stage to open the drive. Tickets for 
the special show were available at all issuing 
agencies and admission was by Bond purchase 
only. The local dailies came through with front 
page breaks. 

Ed May at the Opera House in Lexington, 
Ky., has dressed the front of his house for the 
period of the drive. A six foot American flag 
is placed in a permanent standard on the side- 
walk at the edge of the street, daily; smaller 
flags are displayed over the entire front and 
the boxoffice has a false front designed in red, 
white and blue. On the front, Fifth War Loan 
paper and photos are mounted and complete 
with lettered copy urging the purchase of Bonds 
and Stamps. 

The Bond booth in the lobby is brilliantly 
lighted and manned by members of the various 
women's organizations and the services of the 
American Legion Band were had for the open- 
ing night. 




Jack Foxe's Fifth War Loan Booth at Loew's, 
Richmond, Va., is easily accessible not only to 
patrons but passersby on the street. Girl is 
eqicipped with typewriter, Bonds and appli- 
cation Hank*. 



WMC Booth Set Up in 
Lobby by Reisinger 

To help exploit the short, "Main Street To 
morrow," H. W. Reisinger at Loew's theatre 
in Dayton, Ohio, effected a lobby tieup with 
the War Manpower Commission. A booth was 
set up during the entire week of the engage- 
ment, with women distributing pamphlets to 
all patrons. In addition, there was a 15-minute 
broadcast in the lobby on the opening day, and 
was re-broadcast the following day on the Man- 
on-the-Street program. Newspaper tie-ups with 
all the local papers were also had in this con- 
nection. 



Ties "Post War Jobs" to 
Chamber of Commerce 

Joe Samartano at Loew's Palace, Meriden, 
Conn., reports on a campaign put over by him 
and his assistant, Sam Horwitz for "Post War 
Jobs." A special screening was held for busi- 
ness industrial men connected with the town's 
economic development. A story was planted in 
both dailies by the president of the Chamber 
of Commerce, the Chamber also using a 30 by 
40 display in their building. 

Heralds were distributed by Boy Scouts, 
extra mats planted in the papers and special 
mention of the short was made on all readers 
and ads. 

Victory Garden Talk Arranged 
By May in Lexington 

A Victory Garden talk and demonstration 
and an exhibition of garden apparel for women 
was presented at the Ben Ali theatre in Lex- 
ington, Ky., by Ed May. The program included 
a general talk on gardening and a demonstra- 
tion by Prof. A. J. Olney, head of the depart- 
ment of horticulture, U. K. College of Agricul- 
ture and Home Economics. Prof. Olney an- 
swered gardening questions which had been 
placed in the theatre's question box during the 
previous week. Gardening booklets were dis- 
tributed among gardeners and prospective 
gardeners requesting a copy. Effective displays 
were placed in the lobby of the theatre and 
the special show was stressed in the theatre 
ads. Local dailies came through with stories 
on the activities. 

47 



ORIGINAL NEWSPAPER ADS 




At left, a clever 
original by Carl 
Rogers plugs 
"Bernadette" as 
a holdover at the 
Esquire theatre, 
Toledo, Ohio. 



&t INSIDE STORY OF AN INSIDE JOB BY THE 
GANG THAT STOLE A NATION I 




lustrating Paul Robinson's handiwork 
at the Paramount, New Haven, Conn., 
is this striking display ad for "The Hit- 
ler Gang", with co-hit prominently 
featured. 



48 



Right, one of Lea 
Pollock's attrac- 
tive layouts for a 
current double 
feature bill at 
Loew's, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 




LAUGHTON 

M.C.Ms THRfLUNG. 
ACT* 'ON MT! 



1 1 

CO, 

y 
u. 

k 



*itOM UP ADmwui 



OMEN'Si 



ft RECRUITING WEEK in MOTION \ 

kRMY WORPS PICTURE THEATRES • MAY 1 1 thru MAY 17 ' 



i :rcm 
iines. 



■ rtiiif 



it® 
eisar, 
i kk 



: nrer 



BUFFALO i GREAT LAKES i HIPPODROME 




Above, an attractive directory ad layout originated by Charles B. Taylor^ 
director of advertising and publicity for Shea's, Buffalo, N. Y. Below, credil 
C. C. Murray, city manager, Lincoln theatre, Springfield, III., with this 
five-column eye-arrester. 




HOWMEN PERSONALS 



n New Posts: Haywood Hanna, Imogene, 
ton, Fla. Harry L. Dowdell, Olympia, Ports- 
lth, N. H. Stanley Celmer, Rainbo, Detroit. 

McCann, Times Square, Detroit. James Di 
co, Rex theatre, Detroit. Walter Smelling, 
onial, Wheeling, West Va. Wilbur Eckert, 
ine's Bucyrus, Bucyrus, Ohio. Ken Rockwell, 
rner's Forum, Los Angeles. 
Irs. George Bremen, Wyandotte, Wyandotte, 
h. Helen Bohutinsky, Natco Century, Chicago, 
Marguerite Bartlow, Norwest, Detroit. Diana 
:off, Rialto, Jersey City, N. J. 

assistant Managers: Grace Schmull, News- 
, Baltimore. Md. Xat Hern, RKO Capitol, 
on City. X. J. William Mackey, Courtesy, 
roit Mich. Virginia Hanson, Omaha, Omaha. 
ies Home, Stanley, New York City. 

n the Service: Alfred Parker, Michigan, 
roit, Mich. Paramount, Syracuse. 

lappy Birthday: Joseph G. Seyboldt, Wilbur 
rthner, Deborah B. Washer, Ray R. Summers, 
ary Wtulich, George W. Coleman, Leo H. 
iderson, Erwin Janot, Dwight Van Meter, 
trade Bunchez, Paul S. Gottschall, Fred S. 
ssar, Bob De Laneo, William J. Gates, James J. 
beck, Larry Morris, R. E. Easen, T. W. Lewis, 



Rodney L. Cron, Harold E. Old, Jack Hazlett. 

Clarence Groeteke, Frank Staley, Richard L. 
Moss, Eddie Hohler, Milton Bundt, Jack W. 
Bartholi'c, Abie Beter, L. G. Hertl, Dave Vorzimer, 
George A. Steeb, Robert M. Watts, Jack Nixon, 
Jr., Byron E. Abegglen, Fred C. Lentz, Ed C. 
Curdts, Milton Honnaker, Milton Brenner, Earl 
Lewy, Lawrence E. Forrest, Max Kuperstein, 
Guido Trusty, Mott P. Blair. 

Paul J. Poag, Oliver Menke, Paul Hefner, David 
Schaer, J. Barros Browne, Harvey Kny, William 
W. Birchfield, George J. Flicker, Gerald M. Wes- 
tergren, A. J. Kalberer, S. S. Holland, H. G. 
Moore, Louis Schnitzer, Y. L. Bain, Clay Walker. 

M. J. Gilfillan, Everett N. Olsen, William 
Wright, Sol Strauss, Roland Douchette, Julien E. 
Campbell, Tom Arthur, Russell Allen, Jack Golla- 
day, Maurice F. Magen, George Rice, Wilson H. 
MacDonald, Edgar Jones, Max Keizerstein, Russ 
McKibben, Charles J. Oliver, William F. Burke, 
L. Hayes Garborino, George J. Recktenwald, Carl 
Benson, Robert Miller. 

Leslie F. Larsen, Milton O. Field, Charles L. 
Oswald, Corwin Collins, Roy Gingell, Charles L. 
Clarke, Robert Cox, Jim Barnes, Charles Lock- 
hard, Ram Krishna Sharma, Roland H. Ruden, E. 
E. Crabtree, Everett R. Erickson, Edmund Har- 
rison, Evan Thompson, Clarke A. Sanford. 



Foxe Uses Special Lobby Map on 
"Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble" 

An attractor was the specially constructed 
eight-by-eight-foot map planted in the lobby 
of Loew's theatre, in Richmond, for Jack 
Foxe's date on "Andy Hardy's Blonde Trou- 
ble." The map featured Andy's travels and 
troubles, each point of the trouble illustrated 
with a still, carrying title, catchy copy, dates, 
etc. 

Foxe advertised in the want ad section a 
week ahead of opening for "blonde twins" to 
be guests of Micky Rooney at the opening of 
the picture. When the twins were located, they 
received a wire from the star inviting them to 
the show ; this wire was blown up and used for 
lobby display purposes. The girls were also 
introduced from the stage. 



nrens Radio Contest 
lis "Snow White" 

n connection with his date on "Snow White" 
the RKO Orpheum, in Des Moines, Walter 
Ahrens reports that development of interest 
tered around the singing contests sponsored 
Stations KSO and KRNT. Announcements 
tr these stations well in advance brought in 
testants to be auditioned at the stations. Six 
:hese were chosen to appear on the Orpheum 
■ge opening night of the picture. This win- 
, in turn, competed with the winners of 
en other sections of the state on the Satur- 

following for Bond prizes, 
in addition to the Dwarfs' appearance on 
je, they appeared at schools and broadcast, 
ws stories about these personalities ap- 
red in both the Tribune and Register. 



a street ballyhoo in the form of one of his 
ushers dressed in baseball uniform with a sand- 
wich sign reading: "It's daffier than the daffy 
Dodgers. See Red Skelton." 



Simon's "Twain" Tieup 

In advance and during the run of "Mark 
Twain" at Warner theatre in Memphis, Tenn., 
Joe Simon effected a tieup with one of the lo- 
cal stores, whereby they used six cards at 
their soda fountain and 20 others scattered 
throughout the store to help publicize the date. 
In addition, Simon also landed a three-sheet 
in the foyer of the public library. 



Pollock Welcomes 
"Tars and Spars" 

Officers of Coast Guard Reserve flotillas of 
Geneva, Sodus and Oswego were invited to 
attend a supper in the honor of the cast of 
"TARS and SPARS," Coast Guard show star- 
ring Boatswain's Mate Victor Mature, tomor- 
row night. 

The cast of the show was welcomed by a 
parade through downtown Rochester to Loew's 
theatre, where Lester Pollock arranged a gala 
greeting and parties for after the opening. A 
color guard of Coast Guard regulars from the 
Rochester station led the reserve unit, and 
the parade was headed by Memorial Post, 
American Legion Drum and Bugle Corps. 
"TARS and SPARS" came to Rochester in 
conjunction with a recruiting drive for the 
women's auxiliary of the Coast Guard, and 
included in the marchers were SPAR recruit- 
ers, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. Coast Guard 
officers and city officials reviewed the parade. 

A recruiting booth was set up in the lobby 
of the theatre in addition to two other recruit- 
ing: centers. 



Visitors to the Round Table 



ke Box in Lobby 
jgs "Harvest Moon" 

'or his engagement of "Shine On, Harvest 
on," manager Henry Bergman of the Aztec 
itre, San Antonio, with the aid of Joe Estes, 
;rstate Circuit's publicity director in that 
, arranged for the Studer music shop chain 
)lace a juke box in the theatre lobby, 
"itle song of the picture, as well as other hit 
ibers from the long list included in the pro- 
tion, were given a steady play on this 
:hine. 

11 stores in the Studer chain also put on 
dow displays tied in with the picture. 



ag Lobby Stunt Aids Nickols 
i "Swing Fever" Date 

»ne week before the opening of "Swing 
>er" at the Windsor theatre in Chicago, An- 
n- G. Xickols dressed one of his employees 
loctor's apparel and put him behind a table 
:he lobby, on which were placed various 
icine bottles. A one-sheet carried the fol- 
ing copy : "Have you got a cold or cough ? 
ning a temperature? Take Prof. Ky.ser's 
ing Tonic' ; good for whatever ails you. 
l|l f ." etc., etc. As each patron entered, the 
j|£tor" would call out: "Are you ill? Don't 
II feel well ? Well, then, for the best cure in 
see," etc. 

0or "Whistling in Brooklyn," Andy utilized 
JAGERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY I, 1944 




By Staff Photographer 

At left Pvt Hal Winston, special services, who is stationed at Puerto Rico, was in New York 
on offcial business. Winston was formerly general manager for the Cobian circuit, Puerto 
Rico Right, Pvt. Leon Serin, formerly with Interboro circuit, Long Island, now stationed tn 
Portland, Ore., looks over one of the Quigley Award campaigns with Hy Boettwger, manager 
of the Senator, Washington. 

49 



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MOTORS, NEW, USED, ALL SIZES, VARIABLE 
•peed pulleys, deflectors, exhaust fans. SOUTHERN AIRE, 
BOX 838, Atlanta 1, Ga. 

SQUIRREL CAGE BLOWERS — NEW FACTORY 
stock for prompt shipment — send us your order marking 
AAS Priority MRO (Maintenance, Repair or Operation) 
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cfm, $119.50; 13,500 cfm, $149.50; 22,500 cfm, $199.50 ; 27,500 
cfm, $234.50. Rebuilt motors furnished at lowest market 
prices. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 



PRINTING SERVICE 



THEATRE BLOWUPS. GOOD QUALITY. SERVICE. 
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BOOKS 



RICHARDSON'S BLUEBOOK OF PROJECTION. 
Best seller since 1911. Now in 7th edition. Revised to 
present last word in Sound-Trouble Shooting Charts. Ex- 
pert information on all phases of projection and equipment. 
Special new section on television. Invaluable to beginner 
and expert. $7.25 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 

MOTION PICTURE SOUND ENGINEERING. A 
"must" to all those working with sound equipment. Writ- 
ten by top-flight engineering experts of Hollywood studios 
and research laboratories. Covers all phases of sound 
engineering and equipment. Readable diagrams, charts, 
tables and graphs. $6.50, postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOK- 
SHOP, 1270 Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 

AIR CONDITIONING, WHETHER YOUR THEATRE 

has 300 or 3,000 seats, this book has all the answers on 
air conditioning. Explains various codes and laws con- 
cerning installation. Common sense charts. Indexed. Covers 
air conditioning as it relates to all branches of film indus- 
try. $4. postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 Sixth Ave- 
nue, New York 20. 

SOUND-TROUBLE SHOOTING CHARTS. THE LIT- 
tle book with the blue cover all good operators reach for 
when trouble starts. Will clear up that "puzzler" on all 
types of sound equipment in a jiffy. No booth complete 
without one, $1.00 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 



BOOKKEEPING SYSTEM 



THEATRE MANAGEMENT RECORD AND TAX 
Register. A book that takes the headache out of theatre 
accounting. Covers every detail of accounting in theatre 
operation. Makes keeping of up-to-the-minute records a 
pleasure. Attractive leather cover with gold stamping. $2 
now if you order fast. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 Sixth 
Avenue, New York 20. 



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MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 

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STUDIO EQUIPMENT 



WESTINGHOUSE SYNCHRONOUS MOTORS, 3600 
rpm, 220V three-phase, cost new $105., good condition, 
$57.50; Bell-Howell 220V three-phase camera motor, $125; 
Berndt-Maurer 16mm. recording system, $1,995. Completely 
equipped sound truck for sale. Write for lists. S. O. S. 
CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 



NEW EQUIPMENT 



NEW DOUBLE- BEARINO INTERMITTENT MOVE- 
ments for Simplex projectors. One year guarantee $57.35. 
MOTION PICTURE MAINTENANCE, 72 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. 

DRINKING FOUNTAIN BUBBLERS, $9.95; PHILCO 
intercommunicating systems, master and three substations, 
$74.75; rear shutters for Simplex, $77.50; 15 ampere recti- 
fier bulbs, $6.95; film splicers. 35mm., $5.25; 16mm., $6.95; 
jewelled aisle lights, $3.95; Johnson coin changers, $110.; 
black velourette masking, 79c yard; steel core curtain 
cable, 12j4c ft. ; rechargeable flashlight batteries, (2.20. 
Bargain bulletin mailed. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY 
CORP., New York 18. 



USED EQUIPMENT 



SIX COMPLETE BOOTH EQUIPMENTS — EVEN 
more if required — plenty machines available. Typical value 
— two rebuilt Powers, incandescent lamphouses, sound- 
heads, motors, amplifier, monitor, loudspeaker and sound- 
screen, $975. Sand for special bulletins. S. O. S. CINE- 
MA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 

STILL HAVE PLENTY CHAIRS— DON'T WAIT— 
buy now — 390 Stafford 5-ply veneer back, box spring cush- 
ion chairs, excellent condition. $4.95; 400 Stafford heavy 
inserted panel back, box spring cushion chairs, $6.50 re- 
built, reupholstered ; 252 Grand Rapids ballbearing inserted 
panel back; box spring cushion chairs, $4.50 good condi- 
tion; 700 red twill slipcovers for backs, 49c each, good 
condition. Wire now. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., 
New York 18. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES; TRAIN FOR BETTER 
position. Learn modern theatre management and adver- 
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1927 Write now for free catalog. THEATRE MANAGERS 
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SIGN PAINTING 



SIGN PAINTING. EASY WAY TO PAINT SIGNS. 
Use letter patterns. Avoid sloppy work, wasted time. No 
experience needed for expert work. Free sample. JOHN 
RAHN, 1329 Central Ave., Chicago, 51, 



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BINGO CARDS, DIE CUT, 1 TO 100 OR 1 TO 75, $2.25 

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OBITUARIE 



Lieut. Schaefer, 27, Killed 
In Action on D-Day 

Lieutenant James G. Schaefer, 27, son o> 
George J. Schaefer, chairman of the War Activi 
ties Committee, was killed in action June 6, D-Dajj 
in France, according to a War Department tele 
gram received by his family last Saturday. Lieu: 
tenant Schaefer was a reserve officer called int 
active service January 1, 1942. 

Lieutenant Schaefer was attached to the 82nW 
Airborne Division, reactivated in March, 1942, urj 
der the command of General Bradley. The 82nl 
was the first Airborne Division of the America! _ 
Forces. They acted as the spearhead in Sicily anjjj 
Salerno, and saw action in Naples. 

Lieutenant Schaefer was a graduate of Prince' 
ton University, and was associated with the Skoij 
ras Theatres Corporation until he was called intp= 
active service. 



J] 

m 



iis 
tail 
tEili 
'»e-> 
id of 



Jack Greenbaum, Cleveland 
Exhibitor Many Years 

Jack Greenbaum, 51, Cleveland exhibitor, ind^ 
pendent distributor and theatre premium represer 
tative, died suddenly June 20 of a heart attacl 
Death occurred in the waiting room of a doctc 
whom he went to consult. Mr. Greenbaum pre 
duced the first motion picture ever made in Clevt 
land. It was called "Women Men Love" an: 
starred William Desmond. He was the son \ 
Mark Greenbaum, pioneer exhibitor who built at -p 
operated the first deluxe theatres in Clevelam 
the Alhambra and Knickerbocker. Both still a; 
in operation, the Alhambra, a first run neighbo 
hood house, and the Knickerbocker, an importa: 
subsequent run house. 



Mrs. Will Rogers, Widow 
Of Humorist and Actor 

Mrs. Will Rogers, 65, who died June 21 at hi 
home in Santa Monica, Cal., after a lingering il 
ness, will be buried beside her husband, the la 
humorist and comedian, in Claremore, Okla., at 
time to be announced later. 

Mrs. Rogers was the author of "Will Roger; 
His Wife's Story." She is survived by two son 
James, film actor, and Will, Jr., a second lieutei 
ant with the Army overseas, and a daughte 
Mary. A funeral service was held June 22 at tl 
Church of the Flowers, Forest Lawn Memori 
Park. 



true 
com 
|eti 

IKS, 

ition 
Imeri 
us b: 
ishit 
»Yo 



Mrs. Robert E. Grebe 

Requiem high mass was sung June 24 at t| 
Church of the Holy Innocents, Brooklyn, for Mfl 
Robert E. Grebe, who died at Samaritan Hospit 
Brooklyn, June 21. Mrs. Grebe, film critic, wf 
for many years with the Motion Picture Burea 
the Legion of Decency, the National Board 
Review and the Motion Picture Council of Broo 
lyn. She is survived by her husband and a sc 
Robert E. Grebe, Jr. 



Jack Epstein 

Jack Epstein, 43, 20th Century-Fox cameram 
and brother of Dave Eostein, Hollywood pu 
licist, died of pneumonia June 19 while on loc 
tion at Kanab, Utah. He is survived by his wido 
two children, Richard and Sharon, and sevi 
brothers — Dave, Joseph, Emil, Harry, Morr 
Frank and Jules — and two sisters, Mrs. Esth' 
Nosanov and Mrs. Jennie Adler. 



Lillian G. Harvey 

Funeral services were held at the Riversi 
Memorial chapel for Mrs. Lillian Grossman H 
vey who died at her home June 19. Mrs. Harv 
was secretary to Austin C. Keough, Paramoi 
vice-president, until her resignation due to illni 
several months ago. 



We. 
1 ft resi 
lew 

tt con 

k > 



Open Roy Rogers Film 

An extensive publicity campaign was used 
Rex A. Carr to back the first run showing of I 
public's Roy Rogers special, "Yellow Rose 
Texas," at the Ambassador in Indianapolis, wh> 
the picture opened June 28. 



50 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, I 1 



, anon 





SHOWMEN'S REVIEWS 
SHORT SUBJECTS 
SHORT SUBJECTS CHART 
ADVANCE SYNOPSES 
THE RELEASE CHART 



This department deals with 
new product from the point of 
view of the exhibitor who is 
to purvey it to his own public. 



,n American Romance 

GM — Land of Opportunity 

This is the film which, by report credited, has 
:n in King Vidor's mind and very much on his 
tnda for years. Long has he wanted to make a 
ge-scale attraction portraying A%erica as the 
id of opportunity. 

Much of merit is presented in "An American 
■mance." The canvas, naturally, is broad, like 

• nation itself. The time capsule covers forty 
ars and more. The mighty strength of industrial 
r.erica is told here in equations of iron ore, then 
el, then automobiles, then war planes. All of 
s is impressive through sheer weight. 
Vidor's painstakingly-made production unques- 
nably is of extreme length — 150 minutes from 

to finish. This has imposed upon the producer- 
ector the gargantuan task of trying to maintain 
erest at the pitch required for satisfying results. 
There can be no question about the meticulous 
: - e which "An American Romance'' reflects. It 

true that historical chronology is telescoped 
; convenience's sake and that this is apt to raise 

eyebrow or so on the side of fidelity. Never- 
:less, all of this becomes a minor element in 
ation to the whole. 

<\merica, the land of opportunity, is brought to 
^:us biographically through Brian Donlevy, a 
1lish immigrant who trudges the 1,000 miles from 
( w York to Minnesota, where he meets his cou- 
i, John Qualen, and gets an immediate job on 
Mesabe range. Ambition leads to a study of 
language and a gnawing curiosity about the 

• and what converts it into steel. 

■Te finds out, becomes an open hearth foreman, 

• Ids an automobile out of the exasperation of 
■jt that refuses to work properly and, finally 
jth the aid of Walter Abel and other faithfuls, 
Jates the first steel-topped car. Success is im- 
diate. Donlevy becomes an automotive ty- 
jm, resists unionization, ultimately is moved out 
] the way by the march of industrial progress 
1 retires until the war breaks out. Then, his 
nt converted into plane manufacture, he returns 

his old associates and makes planes for the 
nerica which gave him his start as a day labor- 
at a shovel. 

The parallel story line deals with his six 
ldren. One dies in World War I. A daughter 
es two pilots for World War II. Another 
i. becomes part of the business. Still another 
^•mes a famous violin virtuoso. By his side, 
*ough the years, is his wife, played warmly and 
h gentility by Ann Richards, attractive Austral- 
actress, who is new to American audiences. 
)onlevy does a very effective job. This goes 
Abel. All performances, in fact, are, represen- 
vely good and production values in Technicolor 
excellent. 

*een at the studio. Reviewer' s Rating : Good. — 
i Kann. 

please date, not set. Running time, 151 min. PCA 
9740. General audience classification. 

•e Dangos Brian Donlevy 

■a Ann Richards 

/ard Clinton Walter Abel 

on Dubechek John Qualen 

iy Dangos Horace McNally 

i ' Dangos Mary McLeod 

,rge Dangos Bob Lowell 

>TION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



The Last Horseman 

Columbia — Western with Songs 

Producer Leon Barsha has contrived a swift 
and satisfying picture from the ingredients of the 
Western formula. William Berke's direction gets 
the most out of a cast which includes Russell Hay- 
den, Dub Taylor, Bob Wills and the Texas Play- 
boys. 

The cowboys, on their way home after selling 
a herd of cattle, are robbed of the sale's proceeds. 
Later developments reveal that the town banker, 
played by John Maxwell, is the instigator. Aware 
of the fact that the railroad plans to run a line 
through the ranch where the boys are employed, 
the banker hopes to foreclose the mortgage and 
turn a profit for himself. Russell Hayden, sup- 
ported by Dub and the Playboys, gets wise to the 
plot. He goes after the banker and his henchmen 
and brings them to justice in a fast-moving finish. 

Ann Savage is seen briefly as the cashier of the 
bank. Bob Wills and the Playboys sing several 
numbers which enhance the entertainment value of 
the picture. George Meehan is credited with some 
excellent camera work. Screenplay is by Ed Earl 
Repp. 

Seen at Hollywood's Hitching Post theatre, 
where a 'matinee audience seemed pleased. Re- 
viewer's Rating : Good. — -Thalia Bell. 

Release date, June 22, 1944. Running time, 56 min. 
PCA No. 10321. General audience classification. 

"Lucky" Rolands Russell Hayden 

Cannonball Dub Taylor 

Judy Ann Savage 

Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys, John Maxwell, Frank 
LaRue. 



Mystery Man 



UA — Hopalong Cassidy 

The "mystery man" is Don Costello, the vil- 
lain ; the nemesis is Bill Boyd, as Hopalong Cas- 
sidy, the hero. In what becomes a personal feud, 
arising from chance encounter, Bill, first annoyed, 
then pursued, then put into the law's unheeding 
clutches, finally bests Mr. Costello in a gun fight 
atop jagged cliffs. 

Well photographed and with a moderately tor- 
tuous plot, this picture is action virtually from 
start to finish, and thus fulfills the requirements of 
its class. 

The story has Bill and his two buddies, James 
Rogers and Andy Clyde, and their crew escorting 
a herd to a Texas ranch. In a stopover town, 
they rout the unidentified robber band trying to 
break the local bank. The band is led by mysteri- 
ous Mr. Costello, who poses as commercial travel- 
er while his gang works. Mr. Costello, who likes 
bank and stage robberies, is irked at Mr. Boyd and 
gang, decides to steal the herd, and thereby makes 
a mistake. His first attempt succeeds, but Boyd 
and his cronies regain the herd. 

Next, Costello, disguised as a sheriff, retakes 
the herd, tells a local sheriff Boyd is the rustler 
leader, and then with the herd rides to the ranch 
where it is to be delivered, and collects the cash 
for it. But meanwhile, the local sheriff's daughter 
has apprised her father of his mistake, and re- 
leased the Boyd crowd. They ride after Costello, 
shatter the gang ; and Boyd shatters Costello. 

Andy Clyde furnishes the comedy relief when it 



is needed. The scenes of western country are at 
times more idyllic than in most westerns, with ac- 
curate musical background. 

Harry Sherman produced, assisted by Lewis J. 
Rachmil. George Archainbaud was director, as- 
sisted by Glenn Cook. 

Seen at the Jefferson theatre, New York, at a 
matinee. The audience ivas passive. Reviewer's 
Rating: Good. — Floyd Elbert Stone. 

Release date, May 31, 1944. Running time, 58 min. 
PCA No. 9816. General audience classification. 

Hopalong Cassidy William Boyd 

California Carlson Andy Clyde 

Timmy Rogers S irns ?, lf 

Bud Trilling Don Costello 

Francis McDonald, Forrest Taylor, Eleanor Stewart, Jack 
Rockwell, Bill Hunter, John Merton, Pierce Lyden, Bob 
Burns. 

Welcome Mr. Washington 

British National- Anglo- American— 
Whimsy with the Yanks 

There's a forthright sturdiness about this yarn 
of the impact of the American Army Air Force 
on the rural quiet of a remote English village. It 
is a pity that the film's story was so scanty. Jack 
Whittingham, one of this country's most up-and- 
coming scenarists, worked wonders with the inordi- 
nately slight tale ; putting sharply pointed dialogue 
into the mouths of his brilliantly etched and true- 
to-life characters. But, largely, Mr. Whitting- 
ham's efforts were like the making of bricks with- 
out straw. 

The coming of the Yanks with their bull-dozers, 
their jeeps, their giant aircraft and their unfamiliar 
idiom is a phenomenon very common now in out- 
of-the-way corners of this island. It is all set down 
here with refreshing and accurate brightness. Boy 
duly meets girl. The innate conservatism of the 
bucolic labouring classes clashes with the equally 
pronounced prejudices of a crowd of G. I.'s from 
every one of the United States. And all come 
somehow to a nicer understanding one with the 
other. Also, there is a very pretty picture of 
naive calf-love contributed by a young lady, Peggy 
Cummins, for whom a pleasant film future may 
safely be forecast. 

Barbara Mullen, as leading lady of the piece, 
has very little to do save to look charming and 
winsome, which as audiences are well aware she 
does to perfection. Arthur Sinclair, famed Irish 
actor, comes through with another of his familiar 
romanticised stage-Irishmen. Additionally, the 
American officers, to most critics' complete aston- 
ishment, talk and look like Americans. 

It's a film which will attract the less sophisticated 
in this land and will make money for the exhibitor 
who knows how to exploit its charm ; may even 
amuse American audiences who've heard from this 
side of the queer antics of the folk who inhabit 
England. 

Seen at a London trade shoiv. Reviewer's Rat- 
ing: Good. — Peter Burnup. 

Release date, not set. Running time, 90 min. General 
audience classification. 

Jane Willoughby Barbara Mullen 

Lieut. Johnny Grant Donald Stewart 

Sarah Willoughby Peggy Cummins 

Captain Abbott Leslie Bradley 

Murphy - Arthur Sinclair 

Roy Emerton, Martita Hunt, Graham Moffat, Shelagh 
Frazer, Louise Lord, Paul Blake, Beatrice Varley. 

1969 



carve up the fortune among her incredible, hungry, 
impecunious and grasping relatives and goes off to 
marry the young detective who is alleged to have 
unravelled the mystery of the strange events. 

"Candles at Nine" will do as a supporting feature 
in neighborhood theatres. 

Seen at the Studio One, London, trade show. 

Reviewer's Rating : Mediocre.— -P. B. 

Release date, not set. Running time, 86 min. Adult 
audience.classification. (British). 

Dorothea Capper Jessie Matthews 

William Gordon John Stuart 

Julia Carberry Beatrix Lehmann 

Brenda Tempest Winifred Shotter 

Charles Lacey Reginald Purdell 

Hugh Dempster, Joss Ambler, Eliot M'ajceham, John Sa- 
lew, Vera Bogetti, Andre Van Gyseghem, Ernest Butch- 
er, C. Denier Warren, Patricia Hayes, Gerry Wilmot, 
Guy Fielding. 



Minstrel Man 

PRC — Minstrel Scores Bull's-eye 

Leon Fromkess took the lid off PRC's budget 
to make this picture about minstrelsy and lifted 
his studio's product up to even terms with compet- 
itors for a position on today's programs. Nothing 
preceding this in his production record compares 
as to quality or entertainment value, and nothing 
in contemporary distribution competes with it as 
to kind. Don't sell "Minstrel Man" short. 



Benny Fields is the central figure and main- 
spring of a heart-tugging story about minstrel peo- 
ple, and brings to the singing of five brilliant Harry 
Revel-Paul Webster songs, plus "Melancholy 
Baby," which is the hall-mark of his fame, a tal- 
ent, voice and personality the screen's been too 
long without. Ferde Grofe's music score directed 
by Leo Erdody wraps up the melodic 90 per cent 
of the picture and plumps it smack into every- 
body's lap close up under the heart. 

Gladys George, Alan Dinehart, Roscoe Karns, 
Judy Clark and others in support give the Irwin 
Franklyn- Pierre Gendron script full benefit of 
underplaying called for by Joseph H. Lewis' di- 
rection, with the result that the story spanning 
IS years, holds, without letdown, while the songs 
are scoring a steady succession of bull's-eyes. 

Nostalgic without being old fashioned, yet con- 
taining enough jitterbugging for adolescent fans, 
"Minstrel Man" breaks important new ground 
for PRC, and rates consideration for an important 
place in theatre bookings. 

Previewed at the studio. Reviewer' s Rating : 
Excellent.— W. R. W. 

Release date, July 1, 1944. Running time, 69 min. PCA 
No. 10114. General audience classification. 

Dixie Boy Johnson Benny Fields 

Mae White Gladys George 

Lou Dunn Alan Dinehart 

Roscoe Karns, Judy Clark, Gloria Petroff, Molly Lamont, 
Jerome Cowan, John Raitt, Eddie Kane. 

(Review reprinted from last week's Herald) 



SHORT SUBJECTS 

reviews and synopses 



(Running times are those quoted by the distributors.) 



Follow the Leader 

Monogram — East Side Kids Adventure 

Due to a script that misses fire in the spots 
where it is depended on to produce suspense and 
surprise, this number in the East Side Kids series 
fails to maintain its average. Patriotism is sup- 
plied as motivation this time, Leo Gorcey and 
Huntz Hall wearing Army uniforms much of the 
time, but this asset is discounted by the story and 
by dialogue which offers a few chuckles and 
nothing more to entertain the customers. 

The plot is about two soldiers, one discharged 
from the service for myopia but re-admitted at 
close of the film wearing glasses, who undertake 
to apprehend hijackers of Government alcohols and 
capture a murderer while the police and the mili- 
tary hold their processes of investigation in abey- 
ance. The kids succeed and the film ends, like the 
others in the series, in an attack in force by the 
East Side Kids upon the guilty parties. 

William Crowley and Beryl Sachs wrote the 
script, from a story by Andre Lamb, and William 
Beaudine directed for associate producer Bahney 
A. Sarecky. 

Previewed at the Humley theatre, Hollywood, 
where a Wednesday night audience registered in- 
difference punctuated by a few laughs. Review- 
er's Rating : Fair. — William R. Weaver. 

Release date. June 3, 1944. Running time, 64 min. 
PCA No. 9586. General audience classification. 

Muggs Leo Gorcey 

Glimpy Huntz Hall 

Gabriel Dell, Billy Benedict, Joan Marsh, Jack LaRue, 
Mary Gordon, J. Farrell McDonald, Dave Durand. Bobby 
Stone, Jimmy Strand, Bud Gorman, Gene Austin, the 
Sherrill Sisters. 

Law Men 

Monogram — Western 

Johnny Mack Brown and Raymond Hatton are 
here provided with a standard Western plot thick 
with bank robberies and stage holdups, but con- 
taining relatively few moments of active excite- 
ment. The pace set by director Lambert Hillyer 
is slower than is usual for the series, with the 
accent on scheming and explanation rather than 
horse and gun. 

The two U. S. marshals set themselves up in 
town, one as a gunman-for-hire and the other as a 
shoemaker. Learning the plans of the outlaw band 
to rob the next bank shipment, they set their own 
trap for the leader. There is some suspense when 
it looks as if the plans might backfire, but Brown 
rides up in time to prove the guilt of the town's 
leading banker. 

It's just a routine job for the government men, 
and a similarly routine effort by Charles J. Bige- 
low, who supervised production, and Glenn Tryon, 
who wrote the story and screenplay. 

Seen in the New York theatre, where the audi- 
ence was restless and attentive in turn. Review- 
er's Rating : Mediocre. — E. A. Cunningham. 

Release date, May 6, 1944. Running time, 55 min. 
PCA No. 9963. General audience classification. 

Nevada Johnny Mack Brown 

Sandy Raymond Hatton 

Jan Wiley, Kirby Grant, Robert Frazer, Edmund Cobb, 
Art Fowler, Harry F. Price, Marshall Reed, Isabel 
Withers, Ben Corbett. 

Candles at Nine 

British National- Anglo- American — 

Spooky Shadows 

Miss Jessie Matthews, famed musical comedy 
star these many years, essays a return to the screen 
in this. There are many who will say more's the 
pity, for Miss Matthews toils desperately hard with 
her part ; singing, dancing, acting in a dozen differ- 
ent ways, but never contriving to convince the audi- 
ence that the film is anything but an unbelievable 
melodrama. 

There's some kind of story to it, concerned with 
an aged, wealthy curmudgeon's will. The old man's 
money is bequeathed to his unknown niece, an as- 
pirant actress (Miss Matthews) on condition she 
spend a month in his eerie mansion. Very odd 
things happen in that establishment; spooky hands 
waft hither and thither and there's vast play with 
ghostly shadows. 

Also, there are queer tanglements of murder and 
threat of murder, though how, why, or wherefore 
none can ascertain. In the end, the girl elects to 



THEY FIGHT AGAIN (RKO-Pathe) 

This Is America 

The casualties in World War II, mounting as the 
battlefronts increase in number and intensity, face 
more heartening prospects than their fathers be- 
fore them, as Frederic Ullman, Jr., shows in this 
latest issue of the "This Is America" series. Ad- 
vances in medical science and modern psychological 
techniques have been concentrated on the problem, 
with results which exceed the hopes of other 
days. 

The film follows the rehabilitation of one Sgt. 
Fred Stevens, a waist-gunner from a Flying Fort- 
ress, whose shattered leg and arm have healed but 
have not regained normal muscular activity. He 
goes first to Halloran General Hospital where 
massage, exercise and occupational therapy help 
to overcome shock and despair. Then, in a well- 
equipped but informal rest home in Dutchess 
County, N. Y., he regains fighting form and ac- 
quires a new skill with which to serve his country 
and, perhaps, build a new civilian life. 

The scenes of interested and scientific care 
should help to overcome the fear of those at home 
and, in their emphasis on success, encourage an 
attitude which will be equally helpful to the heroes 
of the Purple Heart when they return. Quentin 
Reynolds reads the commentary with dignity and 
pride. 

Release date, June 30, 1944 17 minutes 

ZERO HOUR (UA) 

World in Action 

Among the hurried preparations for invasion 
was this effort by the usually careful editors of 
the World in Action series. They have included 
scenes from most of the invasions of World War 
II, from Norway and Crete and Dieppe, with a 
commentary on the precision timing necessary to 
combined operations. But with the more immedi- 
ate excitement of the present newsreels, the se- 
quences lose interest except as actual illustrations 
of what might be happening on the Normandy 
shore. There are well photographed scenes of at- 
tack from land, sea and air, tense with realism 
and danger. Many are new and all are historic. 



However, they lack an over-all perspective. Both 
pictures and script show signs of piecing without- 
achieving a focus of attention. 
Release date, not set 22 minutes 

BOOT AND SPUR (RKO-Pathe) 

Sportscope (44,311) 

All the cavalry units are not fighting from tanks, 
as this short subject will prove. There is still need 
for trained horsemen. Men who in civilian life 
were Kentucky Derby winners or handicap polo 
players or steeplechase riders are now riding for 
the Army, rounding out their training in all de- 
partments of riding and shooting. 
Release date, June 16, 1944 8 l /2 minutes 

ABOU BEN BOOGIE (Univ.) 

Color Cartune (8324) 

All the Thousand and One Nights did not in- 
clude such a dream as this Arabian night club 
jumping with hot jive where rugs are cut rather 
than woven. There's a beautiful Sherazade who 
sings blues and dances in style which would be 
exotic in Araby, at any rate. 
Release date, not set 6j4 minutes 

HALFWAY TO HEAVEN (Para.) 

Musical Parade (FF3-6) 

Paramount's latest two-reel Technicolor musical 
features two rising young studio players, Betty 
Rhodes and Johnnie Johnston, along with the Four 
Copelands, Oscar O'Shea and Ray Riggs. It 
tells of a trumpet player who gets his three wishes. 
The first is for a hot trumpet, the second for a 
swanky night-club setting and the third for the 
girl. Walter MacEwan produced and Noel Madi- 
son directed. 

Release date, August 25, 1944 19 minutes 

THE GREEN LINE (20th-Fox) 

Terrytoon (4519) 

There's a thin green line separating the mice 
from their traditional enemies. It's not enough to 
stop one ambitious cat and things look bad for the 
mice until the Mighty One arrives on the scene. 
Release date, July 7, 1944 6 minutes 



1970 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1944 



ADVANCE SYNOPSES 

and information 



BRAZIL 
(Republic) 

PRODUCER: Robert North. DIRECTOR: 
Albert S. Rogell. PLAYERS: Virginia Bruce, 
Tito Guizar, Edward Everett Horton, Veloz 
and Yolanda. 

COMEDY WITH MUSIC. Miss Bruce plays 
an American newspaper woman who is sent to 
South America to get a story on Brazil. She is 
taken around the country by an American naval 
attache and a Brazilian guide who is also a com- 
poser, although he tries to conceal this latter fact 
In the course of their trip, the trio have the oppor- 
tunity to see some Brazilian dances and to hear 
the folk songs of the people. Against this back- 
ground, the naval attache and the newspaper wo- 
man fall in love. 

MURDER IN THE BLUE ROOM 
(Universal) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Frank Gross. 
DIRECTOR: Leslie Goodwins. PLAYERS: 
Anne Gwynne, Donald Cook, Grace McDonald, 
Regis Toomey, June Preisser, Ian Wolfe, Betty 
Kean, Samuel S. Hinds, John LiteL Nella 
Walker, Bill McWilliams. 

MYSTERY. The story deals with one 20-j'ear- 
old murder and another committed when Nella 
Walker, widow of the first victim, reopens her 
home and Bill McWilliams is slain in the same 
room where her husband was killed. The family 
doctor and Regis Toomey, police inspector, trace 
the slayer through old passages under the house 
while Grace McDonald, Betty Kean and June 
Preisser become comically entangled in the chase. 

THE FALCON IN MEXICO 
(RKO Radio) 

PRODUCER: Maurice Geraghty. DIREC- 
TOR: William Berke. PLAYERS: Tom 
Conway, Mona Maris, Martha Mac Vicar, For- 
tunio Bonanova. 

MYSTERY. The Falcon becomes innocently 
involved in a murder revolving around the por- 
trait of a young Mexican girl. He traces clues 
leading him to Mexico and an artists' colony near 
Mexico City where several more murders take 
place. He finally solves the crimes in spite of the 
obstacles that arise. 

MAISIE GOES TO RENO 
(M-G-M) 

PRODUCER: George Height. DIRECTOR: 
Harry Beaumont. PLAYERS: Ann Sothern, 
John Hodiak, Tom Drake, Marta Linden, Ava 
Gardner, Bunny Waters, Dick Nelson, Roland 
De Pree, Donald Meek. 

COMEDY-DRAMA. Maisie goes to Reno in 
this newest of the Maisie series. She is the leader 

! of a girl's band and becomes innocently involved 
in a blackmail plot which has to do with a divorce. 
Through various complications she and John Ho- 
diak and Tom Drake all become entangled, but 

| finally manage to work themselves out. 

FAREWELL MY LOVELY 
(RKO Radio) 

PRODUCER: Adrian Scott. DIRECTOR: 
Edward Dymtryk. PLAYERS: Dick Powell, 
Anne Shirley, Claire Trevor, Mike Mazurki, 
Douglas Walton, Miles Mander. 

MYSTERY-COMEDY. A private detective 
down on his luck is employed by an ex-jailbird 
to locate his former sweetheart. She learns the 
detective is after her and, in an effort to hide her 
identity, manages to involve the detective in a 
murder. He finally realizes she is the girl he's 
looking for when she tries her charms to lure 
him deeper into the tangled evidence. She stages 
a trap, but it almost ends in a slaying as her iden- 
tity is revealed. 



HAVING WONDERFUL CRIME 
(RKO Radio) 

PRODUCER: Robert Fellows. DIRECTOR: 
A. Edward Sutherland. PLAYERS: Pat 
O'Brien, George Murphy, Carole Landis, Chili 
Williams, Lenore Aubert, Richard Martin, 
Gloria Holden, Charles Brown, Wee Willie 
Davis, George Zucco. 

COMEDY-DRAMA. A young couple, both en- 
thusiastic amateur detectives, go to a lodge near 
the seashore for their honeymoon. An attorney 
friend, hiding out to escape being called as a wit- 
ness in a previous case, accompanies them. While 
at the lodge a world famous illusionist is murdered. 
They have to give up their honeymoon to solve 
the case in order to avert arrest as suspects and 
exposure of their lawyer friend. 

MARKED TRAILS 
(Monogram) 

SUPERVISOR: William Strohbach. DIREC- 
TOR: J. P. McCarthy. PLAYERS: Hoot Gib- 
son, Bob Steele, Veda Ann Borg. 

WESTERN. Hoot and Bob meet a young 
couple who, although masquerading as respectable 
citizens, are in reality the leaders of a notorious 
gang. There have been several stagecoach rob- 
beries near the town, as well as killings and mis- 
cellaneous gunplay. Hoot and Bob set out to 
clean up the place, and in the course of events foil 
another stagecoach robbery and unmask the gang 
leaders. 



THREE LITTLE SISTERS 
(Republic) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Harry Grey. DI- 
RECTOR: Joseph Santley. PLAYERS: Mary 
Lee, Ruth Terry, Cheryl Walker, William 
Terry. 

DRAMA. This has a war background. Three 
girls and their father care for a big estate. One 
of the girls, a wneel-chair invalid, falls for a soldier 
through correspondence. He has a leave. Her 
sisters, plan to use the big manor house. One of 
them poses as the girl to whom the soldier has 
been writing. In the end he is devoted to the real 
girl, the one in the wheelchair and, although the 
deception is exposed, the house becomes a service- 
man's canteer. 



TRAIL TO GUNSIGHT 
(Universal) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Oliver Drake. 
DIRECTOR: Vernon Keays. PLAYERS: 
Eddie Dew, Maris Wrixon, Lyle Talbot, Buzz 
Henry, Marie Austin, Glenn Strange, Charles 
Morton. 

WESTERN. Dan Creede and his pal, Hora- 
tius. find and return to his home little Tim Wagner 
after the boy's father has been slain by bandits. 
There Mary, Tim's mother, has unwittingly hired 
the leader of the crooks. Bill Hollister, the sher- 
iff, and Dan manage to trap the crooks and save 
Mary and her ranch. 

EVER SINCE VENUS 
(Columbia) 

PRODUCER: Rudy Flothow. DIRECTOR: 
Arthur Dreifuss. PLAYERS: Alan Mowbray, 
Ina Ray Hutton and Band, Ann Savage, Ross 
Hunter, Hugh Herbert, Billy Gilbert, Glenda 
Farrell, Marjorie Gateson, Fritz Feld, Bill 
Shawn. 

COMEDY WITH MUSIC. Ross Hunter is a 
scientist who has developed a new lipstick while his 
friend. Hugh Herbert, writes the song awarded a 



thousand dollar prize by a big cosmetic manufac- 
turer as the climax of his beauty pageant. Aided 
by Ann Savage, a beauty shop owner, Ross seeks 
to market his lipstick which proves so good a heavy 
order snows them under. Ann exerts her feminine 
wiles and persuades the big manufacturer to ar- 
range a tieup with Ross and all is serene. 



I MARRIED A STRANGER 
(Monogram) 

PRODUCER: King Brothers. DIRECTOR: 
William Castle. PLAYERS: Dean Jagger, Neil 
Hamilton, Kim Hunter, Claire Whitney, Robert 
Mitchum, Lou Lubin, Dick Elliott, Mary Field, 
Edward Keane, Minerva Urecal, Milton Kibbee, 
Janie Mattmann. 

ROMANTIC COMEDY. A girl marries a man 
she has just met. On her wedding-day he disap- 
pears. Three months later she gets a telegram, 
purportedly from him, telling her to come to an- 
other city. There she meets an old boy-friend and 
the two set out to find the missing husband. They 
become involved with the police, and a murder is 
committed, but in the end the girl and her husband 
are happily reunited. 

TRIGGER LAW 

(Monogram) 

PRODUCER: Lindsley Parsons. DIREC- 
TOR: Vernon Keays. PLAYERS: Hoot Gib- 
son, Bob Steele, Ralph Lewis, Mike Letz, 
Mauritze Hugo, Beatrice Gray. 

WESTERN. A gang of hoodlums, through 
artifice and trickery, win all the prizes at a rodeo. 
Through the efforts of Hoot Gibson and Bob 
Steele, the hoodlums are driven out of town and 
order is restored. 



RUSTLERS HIDEOUT 
(PRC Pictures) 

PRODUCER: Sigmund Neufeld. DIRECTOR: 
Sam Newfield. PLAYERS: Buster Crabbe, 
Al St. John, Patti McCarthy, Charles King, 
John Merton, Terry Frost, Hal Price, Lane 
Chandler, Al Ferguson, Frank McCarroll, Ed 
Cassidy. 

WESTERN. Two cattle-herders, Billy and 
Fuzzy, refuse to move their herd through Medi- 
cine Pass because previous herds have been rustled 
there. They go to a nearby town to investigate 
and put a stop to a crooked card game. They find 
that the gambler is in league with the local banker, 
and both are responsible for the cattle-rustling. 
The banker kills the gambler and places the blame 
on Billy. But the two friends outmaneuver the 
crooks and, after a fast gun-battle, the cattle are 
saved. 



SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 
(Republic) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Eddy White. DI- 
RECTOR: John English. PLAYERS: Roy 
Rogers and Trigger, Dale Evans, Ann Gillis, 
Bob Nolan and Sons of the Pioneers. 

WESTERN. A young woman rancher comes in- 
to town to hire girl cowhands to replace the men 
she has fired for paying too much attention to her 
kid sister. She meets Roy Rogers, who tries to 
persuade her to give his friends their jobs. In 
the course of the argument the pair is jailed for 
creating a disturbance. By the time they are re- 
leased Roy has fallen in love with the girl, but 
she will have none of him. He stages a fake raid 
to impress her. A gang of horse-thieves turns 
the raid into the real thing, but is frustrated bv 
Roy and the Sons of the Pioneers. As a result, 
the boys get their jobs back. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



1971 



SHORT SUBJECTS CHART 

index to reviews, synopses 



COLUMBIA 

ALL STAR COMEDIES 
(Average 17 Mln.) 
Prod. Ret. P.D. 

No. Title Date Page 

5425 Shot In the Eseape 8-6-43 1535 

(Gilbert & Nazarro) 

5401 I Can Hardly Walt 8-13-43 1535 

(Stooges) 

5426 Farmer for a Day 8-20-43 1535 

(Clyde) 

5427 Quack Service 9-3-43 1534 

(Una Merkel) 

5409 Pitchin' in the Kitchen. .9- 10-43 1543 

(Herbert) 

5402 Dizzy Pilots 9-24-43 1576 

(Stooges) 

5421 A Rookie's Cookie 10-8-43 1598 

(Brendel) 

5428 Garden of Eatin' 10-22-43 1637 

(Summervilie) 

5429 You Dear Boy 11-4-43 ,8S7 

(Vera Vague) 

5403 Phony Express 11-18-43 1637 

(Stooges) 

5430 He Was Only Feudln' 12-3-43 1677 

(Clyde) 

5410 Who's Hugh? 12-17-43 1697 

(Herbert) 

5404 A Gem of a Jam 12-30-43 1697 

(Stooges) 

5431 To Heir Is Human 1-14-44 1743 

(Langdon-Merkel) 

5432 Dr. Feel My Pulse 1-21-44 1754 

(Vague) 

5405 Crash Goes the Hash 2-5-44 1783 

(Stooges) 

5433 Bachelor Daze 2-17-44 1783 

(Summervilie) 

5434 His Tale Is Told 3-4-44 1803 

(Clyde) 

5406 Busy Buddies 3-18-44 1803 

(Stooges) 

5435 Defective Detectives 4-3-44 1922 

(Langdon-Brendel) 

5411 Oh Baby 4-17-44 1870 

(Herbert) 

5422 Crazy Like a Fox 5-1-44 1887 

(Gilbert) 

5407 The Yoke's on Me 5-26-44 1870 

(Stooges) 

5436 You Were Never Uglier 6-2.44 1911 

(Clyde) 

5423 Mopey Dope 6-16-44 

(Langdon-Brendel) 

5412 His Hotel Sweet 7-9-44 

(Herbert) 

COLOR RHAP80DIES 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

5501 The Rocky Ruin to Ruin. 10-22-43 1535 

5502 Imagination 11-19-43 1659 

5503 The Herring Murder 

Mystery 1-20-44 1743 

5504 Disillusioned Bluebird ...6-15-44 .... 

PHANTASIES CARTOONS 
(Average 7 Mln.) 

5701 Nursery Crimes 10-8-43 1598 

5702 The Cocky Bantam 11-12-43 1637 

5703 The Playful Pest 12-3-43 1677 

5704 Polly Wants a Doctor 1-6-44 1743 

5705 Magic Strength 2-4-44 1762 

5706 Lionel Lion 3-3-44 1911 

5707 Giddy Yapping 4-7-44 1870 

5708 Tangled Travels 6-9-44 1959 

5709 Mr. Fore by Fore 7-7-44 

FOX & CROW 
(7 Minutes) 

5751 Room and Bored 9-30-43 1576 

5752 Way Down Yonder In the 

Corn II -25-43 1659 

5753 The Dream Kids 4-28-44 1887 

5754 Mr. Moocher 7-28-44 

FILM VODVIL 

(10 Minutes) 

5951 No. I Mousie Powell 9-10-43 1597 

5952 No. 2 Cootie Williams 10-8-43 1598 

5953 No. 3 Featuring Zeb 

Carver 11-19-43 1637 

5954 No. 4 This Is Ft. Dlx 1-7-44 1743 

5955 No. 5 Novak's Comedy 

Band 4-21-44 1887 



For information on short subjects turn to the Product 
Digest Section pages indicated by the numbers which 
follow the titles and release dates in the listing. Product 
Digest pages are numbered consecutively and are sepa- 
rate from Motion Picture Herald page numbers. For 
1942-43 short subject releases, prior to September, 1943, 
see pages 1510, 1511 and 1512. 



Prod. Rel. P.D. 

No. Title Date Page 

COMMUNITY SING (Series 7) 
(9 Minutes) 

5651 No. I On a Wing and 

a Prayer 7-29-43 1472 

5652 No. 2 Delta Rhythm Boys. 8-27-43 1535 

5653 No. 3 Patriotle Songs 9-24-43 1543 

5654 No. 4 Baby Smiles at Me. 10-22-43 1637 

5655 No. 5 Whistlln' In 

Wyomln' 11-25-43 1743 

5656 No. 6 Pistol Packla' 

Mama 12-10-43 1697 

5657 No. 7 Christmas Carols ..12-24-43 1697 

5658 No. 8 Alouette 1-28-44 1718 

5659 No. 9 Sunday, Monday, 

Always 2-25-44 1783 

5660 No. 10 Malrzy Doats 3-17-44 1815 

5661 No. II Yes'r That's My 

Baby 5-16-44 1887 

5662 No. 12 Too Young Or Too 

Old 6-30-44 .... 

PANORAMICS 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

5901 Birds on the Wing 8-26-43 1535 

5902 Babies by Bannister 10-1-43 1576 

5903 Camera Digest . 1-14-44 1743 

5904 Traditions of Mexico 4-18-44 1922 

SCREEN SNAPSHOTS (Serlee 23) 
(10 Minutes) 

5851 No. I 8-15-43 1534 

5852 No. 2 9-17-43 1543 

5853 No. 3 10-15-43 1597 

5854 No. 4 11-19-43 1637 

5855 No. 5 12-17-43 1659 

5856 No. 6 1-14-44 1754 

5857 No. 7 2-18-44 1762 

5858 No. 8 3-24-44 1815 

5859 No. 9 4-21-44 1870 

5860 No. 10 6-2-44 1935 

WORLD OF SPORTS 
(10 Minutes) 

5801 Kings of Basketball 8-27-43 1535 

5802 Cue Wizards 9-30-43 1576 

5803 Champ of Champions 10-29-43 1637 

5804 Ten Pin Aees 11-26-43 1659 

5805 Winged Targets 1-7-44 1718 

5806 Follow Through with 

Sam Byrd 2-18-44 1783 

5807 Golden Gloves 3-31-44 1838 

5808 Table Tennis Topnotchers. .5-5-44 1887 

5809 Mat Maulers 6-19-44 

5810 G. I. Sports 7-28-44 .... 

LI'L ABNER 
(8 Minutes) 

5601 Amoozin but Confoozln' 3-3-44 1783 

5602 Sadie Hawkin's Day 5-4-44 1935 

5603 A Peekoolyar Sltcheeayshun. 6-30-44 



TWO REEL SPECIALS 
(Average 20 Minutes) 

A-404 Main Street Today 3-25-44 1815 

A-405 Patrolling the Ether 4-22-44 1838 

A-406 Easy Life 5-20-44 .... 

FITZPATRICK TRAVELTALKS (Color) 
(9 Minutes) 
T-5II Thru the Colorado 

Rockies 10-23-43 1637 

T-512 Grand Canyon — Pride of 

Creation 11-27-43 1677 



Prod. Re!. P.D. 

No. Title Date Page 

T-513 Salt Lake Diversions. .. 12-25-43 1697 

T-514 Day In Death Valley. ... 1-22-44 1743 

T-515 Visiting St. Louis 2-19-44 1762 

T-516 Mackinac Island 3-18-44 1803 

T-517 Along the Cactus Trail. .4-15-44 1838 

T-518 Colorful Colorado 5-20-44 1922 

T-519 Roaming Through Arizona. 6-3-44 1922 

T-520 City of Brigham Young . .6- 17-44 

PETE SMITH SPECIALTIES 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

S-551 Practical Joker 1-8-44 1743 

S-552 Home Maid 2-19-44 1762 

S-553 Groovie Movie 4-8-44 1838 

S-554 Sportsman's Memories 4-22-44 1846 

S-555 Movie Pests 7-8-44 

PASSING PARADE 
(Average 10 Minutes) 

K-571 Immortal Blacksmith 5-20-44 1922 

MINIATURES 
(10 Minutes) 

M-581 My Tomato 12-4-43 1697 

M-582 Kid In Upper Four. ... 12-25-43 1718 

M-583 No News Is Good News. 12-18-43 1697 

M-584 Tale of a Dog 4-15-44 1846 

M-585 A Great Day's Coming. .4-22-44 1846 

M-586 Important Business 4-29-44 1846 

M-587 Why Daddy 5-20-44 1922 

M-588 Somewhere, U. S. A 6-3-44 1922 

OUR GANG COMEDIES 
(Average 10 Minutes) 

C-499 Radio Bugs 4-1-44 1762 

C-500 Dancing Romeo 4-29-44 1846 

TECHNICOLOR CARTOONS 
(Average 8 Minutes) 

W-456 Strange Innertube 1-22-44 1743 

1943-44 

W-531 Zoot Cat 2-26-44 1783 

W-532 Screwball Squirrel 4-1-44 1846 

W-533 Batty Baseball 4-22-44 1870 

W-534 Million Dollar Cat 5-6-44 1887 

W-535 The Tree Surgeon 6-3-44 1922 

W-536 Happy Go Nutty 6-24-44 

SPECIAL RELEASE 

X-510 Danger Area 1-1-44 1718 



PARAMOUNT 



UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS (Color) 
(Average 10 Minutes) 

No. I 11-12-43 

No. 2 1-7-44 

No. 3 3-3-44 

No. 4 5-12-44 

No. 5 6-23-44 

No. 6 ...9-1-44 



1659 
1726 
1838 

1935 



MADCAP MODELS (Color) 
(Average 7 Minutes) 



U3-I 






1543 


U3-2 




12-3-43 


1659 


U3-3 




1-21-44 


1735 


U3-4 




3-10-44 


1803 


U3-5 


And to Think 1 Saw It 


on 






Mulberry Street 


5-5-44 


1959 


U3-6 


Jasper Goes Hunting.. 


. .7-26-44 






POPEYE THE SAILOR 






(Average 7 Minutes) 




E3-I 


Her Honor the Mare.. 


.11-26-43 


1658 


E3-2 


Marry Go Round 


.12-31-43 


1726 



Prod. Rel. P.D. 

No. Title Date Page 

E3-3 We're on Our Way to Rio.4-21-44 1887 

E3-4 Anvil Chorus Girl 5-26-44 

E3-5 Spinach-Packin' Papa 7-21-44 

E3-6 Puppet Love 8-11-44 

E3-7 Pitching Woo at the Zoo.. 9-1-44 

E3-8 Moving Aweigh 9-22-44 .... 

POPULAR SCIENCE (Color) 
(10 Minutes) 

J3-I No. I 10-15-43 1637 

J3-2 No. 2 12-10-43 1677 

J3-3 No. 3 3-3-44 1783 

J3-4 No. 4 4-7-44 1887 

J3-5 No. 5 6-2-44 1959 

J3-6 No. 6 8-4-44 

SPEAKING OF ANIMALS 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

Y3-I Tails of the Border 12-17-43 1677 

Y3-2 In Winter Quarters 1-28-44 1762 

Y3-3 In the Newsreel 3-17-44 1838 

Y3-4 Your Pet Problem 3-19-44 1922 

Y3-5 In a Harem 7-14-44 

Y3-6 9-15-44 .... 

SPORTLIGHTS 

(Average 9 Minutes) 

R3-I Mermaids on Parade 10-22-43 1637 

R3-2 Ozark Sportsmen 11-19-43 1637 

R3-3 G. I. Fun 12-24-43 1677 

R3-4 Swimcapades 1-14-44 1726 

R3-5 Open Fire! 2-18-44 1783 

R3-6 Heroes on the Mend 3-24-44 1838 

R3-7 Trail Breakers 4-28-44 1887 

R3-8 Speed Couriers 6-9-44 1959 

R3-9 Catch 'Em and Eat 'Em. ..7-7-44 .... 

R3-I0 Furlough Fishing 8-25-44 

MUSICAL PARADE 
(20 Minutes) 

FF3-I Mardl Gras 10-1-43 1506 

FF3-2 Caribbean Romance 12-17-43 1659 

FF3-3 Lucky Cowboy 2-11-44 1735 

FF3-4 Showboat Serenade 4-14-44 1838 

FF3-5 Fun Time 6-16-44 1911 

FF3-6 Halfway to Heaven 8-25-44 1970 

LITTLE LULU 

(9 Minutes) 

D3-I Eggs Don't Bounce 1-28-44 1726 

D3-2 Hullaba-lulu 2-25-44 1783 

D3-3 Lulu Gets the Birdie. .. .3-31-44 1887 

D3-4 In Hollywood 5-19-44 

D3-5 Lucky Lulu 6-30-44 

D3-6 It's Nifty to be Thrifty. .8-18-44 

D3-7 I'm Just Curious 9-8-44 

D3-8 Indoor Outing 9-29-44 

NOVELTOON 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

P3-I No Mutton for Nuttln*. . 1 1-26-43 1677 

P3-2 Hen Pecked Rooster 2-18-44 1763 

P3-3 Cilly Goose 3-24-44 1838 

P3-4 Suddenly It's Spring 4-28-44 1959 



RKO 

WALT DISNEY CARTOONS (Color) 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

34.115 How to Play Golf 3-10-44 1803 

34.116 Donald Duck and the 

Gorilla 3-31-44 1838 

34.117 Contrary Condor 4-21-44 1870 

34.118 Commando Duck 5-12-44 1911 

1943-44 

44,101 Spring Time for Pluto. . .6-23-44 1959 

SPORTSCOPE 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

44.301 Field Trial Champions. .9-10-43 1598 

44.302 Joe Kirkwood 10-8-43 1598 

44.303 Stars and Strikes 11-5-43 I65S 

44.304 Mountain Anglers 12-3-43 1677 

44.305 Co-ed Sports 12-31-43 1726 

44.306 Basket Wizards (-28-44 1754 

44.307 Mallard Flight 2-25-44 1803 

44.308 On Pelnt 3-24-44 1838 

44.309 Past Performances 4-21-44 1887 

44.310 Boys Camp 5-19-44 1946 

44.311 Boots and Spurs 6-16 44 1970 



1972 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1944 



Fred. Rel. P.D. 

No. Titli Date Page 

HEALINER REVIVALS 
(Average 19 Minutes) 

43.201 Harris In the Spring 9-10-43 1543 

43.202 Rhythm on the 

Rampage .'10-8-43 1576 

43.203 Romancing Along 11-5-43 1658 

43.204 Music Will Tell 12-3-43 1677 

EDGAR KENNEDY 
(Average 17 Minutes) 

43.401 Not on My Account 9-17-43 1598 

43.402 Unlucky Dog 11-12-43 1637 

43.403 Prunes and Polities 1-7-44 1726 

43.404 Love Your Landlord 3-3-44 1815 

43.405 Radio Rampage 3-28-44 1838 



LEON ERROL 
(Average 17 Minutes) 

43.701 Seeing Nellie Home 9-3-43 1598 

43.702 Cutle on Duty 10-29-43 1637 

43.703 Wedtlme Stories 12-24-43 1598 

43.704 Say Uncle 2-8-44 1803 

43.705 Poppa Knows Worst. .. .4-14-44 1838 

FLICKER FLASH BACKS 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

44.201 No. I 9-3-43 1535 

44.202 No. 2 10-1-43 1576 

44.203 No. 3 10-29-43 1606 

44.204 No. 4 11-26-43 1659 

44.205 No. 5 12-24-43 1677 

44.206 No. 6 1-21-44 1718 

44.207 No. 7 2-18-44 1803 



THIS IS AMERICA 
(Average 19 Minutes) 

43.101 Sailors All 11-19-43 1654 

43.102 Letter to a Hero 12-17-43 1677 

43.103 New Prisons— New Men 1-14-44 1718 

43.104 Mall Call 2-11-44 1754 

43.105 News Front 3-10-44 1803 

43.106 Aircraft Carrier 4-7-44 1846 

43.107 Viva Mexico 5-5-44 1887 

43.108 Hot Money 6-2-44 1935 

43.109 They Fight Again 6-30-44 1970 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 

MOVIETONE ADVENTURES (Color) 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

4251 Flying Gunners 9-24-43 1543 

4252 Snowland Sentinels 11-19-43 1543 

4253 Leathernecks on Parade 1-14-44 1718 

(Black and White) 

4201 Sails Aloft 3-31-44 1659 

4202 Silver Wings 2-18-44 1735 

4203 Mailman of Snake River. . .5-5-44 1846 

MAGIC CARPET (Color) 
(9 Minutes) 

4151 Mormon Trails 8-20-43 1534 

4152 Coast of Strategy 10-15-43 1543 

4156 Kingdom of Treasure 12-3-43 1658 

4154 A Volcano Is Born 12-24-43 1718 

4155 Realm of Royalty 2-4-44 1718 

4153 Steamboat on the River. . .3- 10-44 1659 

SPORTS REVIEWS 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

4301 Dog Sense 9-3-43 1543 

4302 Champions Carry On 12-10-43 1576 

4303 Fun for All 4-14-44 1846 

4304 Students of Form 6-30-44 

(Color) 

4351 Nymphs of the Lake 6-9-44 1959 

4352 Ski Slopes 7-14-44 

TERRYT0ON8 (Technicolor) 
(7 Minutes) 

4501 Mighty Mouse Rides Again. 8-6-43 1935 

4502 Camouflage 8-27-43 1534 

4503 Somewhere In Egypt 9-17-43 1543 

4504 Down with Cats 10-7-43 1543 

4505 Aladdin's Lamp 10-22-43 1576 

4506 Lion and the Mouse 11-12-43 1637 

4507 Yokel Duck Makes Good. . 1 1-26-43 1659 

4508 The Hopeful Donkey 12-17-43 1658 

4510 The Helicopter 1-21-44 1697 

4509 The Butcher of Seville 1-7-44 1658 

4511 Wreck of the Hesperus 2-11-44 1658 

4512 A Day In June 3-3-44 1785 

4513 The Champion of Justice. .3-17-44 1762 

4514 The Frog and the 

Princess 4-7-44 1762 

4515 Mighty Mouse Meet* 

Jekyll and Hyde Cat 4-28-44 1815 

4516 My Boy Johnny 5-12-44 1846 

4517 Wolf! Wolf! 6-2-44 1922 

4518 Eliza on the Ice 6-23-44 1935 



Proa. 
No. 



Title 



Rel. 
Date 



P.D. 
Page 



Prod. 
No. 



Title 



Rel. P.D. 
Date Page 



4519 The Green Line.. 

4520 Carmen's Veranda 



7-7-44 1970 

....7-28-44 



MARCH OF TIME 
(Average 18 Minutes) 



VI0- 
VI0- 

VIO 
VIO 
VIO- 
VIO 
VIO 
VIO. 
VIO 
VIO 
VIO 



9-10-43 1543 



Airways to Peace 

Portugal — Europe's 

Crossroads 

Youth In Crisis....... 

Naval Loo of Victory.. 

Upbeat In Music 

Sweden's Middle Road 

Post-war Jobs 

South American Front. .3-24-44 
The Irish Question 4-21-44 

10 Underground Report ..5-19-44 

11 Back Door To Tokyo 6-16-44 



.10-8-43 
.11-5-43 
.12-3-43 
12-31-43 
.1-28-44 
.2-25-44 



1566 
1606 
1658 
1697 
1726 
1774 
1819 
1870 
1887 
1946 



DRIBBLE PUSS PARADE 
(9 Minutes) 

4901 Fuss and Feathers 10-29-43 1617 

4902 Lew Lehr Makes the News. 5-26-44 1959 



UNITED ARTISTS 



WORLD IN ACTION 
(21 Minutes) 

War for Men's Minds. .. .8-13-43 1512 

The Labor Front 11-19-43 1658 

Russia's Foreign Policy 1735 

Battle of Europe 5-5-44 1898 

Global Air Routes 6-23-44 1959 

Zero Hour 1970 



(12 Minutes) 
Raid Report 



11-12-43 1718 



UNIVERSAL 

COLOR CARTUNES 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

8237 Meatless Tuesday 12-20-43 1658 

8238 Barber of Seville 4-10-44 1815 

8239 Fish Fry 6-19-44 1946 

SWING SYMPHONIES 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

8231 Boogie Woogle Man 9-27-43 1557 

8232 Greatest Man In Slam 3-27-44 1718 

8233 Jungle Jive 5-15-44 1838 

8234 Abou Ben Boogie 1970 



8371 
8372 
8373 

8374 
8375 

8376 
8377 

8378 
8379 
8380 



8351 
8352 
8353 

8354 
8355 
8356 
8357 
8358 
8359 
8360 
8361 



PERSON— ODDITIES 
(Average 9 Minutes) 

Wizard of Autos 9-20-43 

Farmer Gene Sarazen. ... 10-25-43 
Fannie Hurst and Her 

Pets '. 11-22-43 

World's Youngest Aviator. 12-29-43 
Mrs. Lowell Thomas Fur 

Farmer 1-31-44 

The Barefoot Judge 2-28-44 

Aviation Expert Donald 

Douglas 3-20-44 

Foster's Canary College. . .4-22-44 
Varga and his Beautief. . .5-22-44 
The Honest Forger 6-19-44 

VARIETY VIEWS 
(9 Minutes) 

Who's Next 9-27-43 

l-A Dogi 10-18-43 

Mister Chimp Raises 

Cain 11-29-43 

Wings In Record Time. . 12-27-43 

Amazing Metropolis 1-17-44 

Magazine Model 1-24-44 

Animal Tricks 2-21-44 

Hobo News 3-27-44 

Fraud by Mall 4-24-44 

Mr. Chimp Goes South 5-29-44 

Bear Mountain Game 6-26-44 



1557 
1597 

1637 
1754 

1735 
1783 

1878 
1838 
1911 



1535 
1657 

1658 
1697 
1726 
1735 
1783 
1878 
1838 
1922 



NAME-BAND MUSICALS 
(Average 15 Minutes) 

8121 Hit Tune Serenade 9-29-43 1543 

8122 Sweet Jam 10-27-43 1998 

8123 Choo-Choo Swing 11-24-43 1698 

8124 Radio Melodies 12-29-43 1658 

8125 New Orleans Blues 1-26-44 1718 

8126 Sweet Swing 2-23-44 1762 

8127 Felow on a Furlough 3-29-44 1815 

8128 Stars and Violins 4-26-44 1846 

8129 Melody Garden 5-17-44 1846 

8130 Pagliacci Swings It 6-14-44 1959 

TWO-REEL SPECIAL 

7110 Eagle vs. Dragon 4-5-44 1815 



8112 



1943-44 

With the Marines at 
Tarawa 



.3-1-44 1774 



VITAPHONE 



9001 
9002 
9003 
9004 
9005 
9006 



9101 

9102 
9103 
9104 
9105 
9106 



9501 
9502 
9503 
9504 
9505 
9506 
9507 
9508 
9509 
9510 
9511 



9601 

9602 
9603 
9604 

9605 

9606 
9607 
9608 

9609 
9610 



TECHNICOLOR SPECIALS 
(Average 20 Minutes) 

Women at War 10-2-43 

Behind the Big Top 11-27-43 

Task Forte 12-11-43 

Devil Boats 7-22-44 

Winner's Circle 5-6-44 

Musical Movieland 8-5-44 



FEATURETTES 
(20 Mlnutrs) 

Voice That Thrilled the 

World 10-16-43 

Over the Wall 12-25-43 

Grandfather's Follies 2-5-44 

Our Frontier in Italy 4-29-44 

Night In Mexico City. .. .3-25-44 
U. S. Marines On Review. .7-8-44 



SPORTS PARADE 
(Average 10 Minutes) 

Tropical Sportland 10-9-43 

Desert Playground 11-13-43 

Into the Clouds 1-1-44 

Baa Baa Blacksheep 1-22-44 

Dogle Roundup 2-26-44 

Chinatown Champs 3-18-44 

Backyard Golf 4-22-44 

Filipino Sports Parade. .. .6- 10-44 

Mexican Sportland 5-13-44 

Cattlemen's Days 6-24-44 

Colorado Trout 7-1-44 



1543 
1658 
1677 

1911 



1598 
1718 
1743 
1870 
1815 



1597 
1598 
1718 
1735 
1743 
1815 
1870 
1959 
1911 
1959 



MELODY MASTER BANDS 
(10 Minutes) 

Hit Parade of the Gay 

Ninetl 9-18-43 

Sweetheart Serenade 10-23-43 

Cavalcade of the Dance. . 1 1-20-43 
Freddie Fisher and his 

Band 12-18-43 

Ted Weems and His 

Merchant Marine Band. 1-29-44 

Songs of the Range 6-10-44 

South American Sway 3-18-44 

Rudy Vallee's Coast Guard 

Band 4-15-44 

Junior Jive Bombers 7-1-44 

Listen to the Bands 8-19-44 



1598 
1598 
1598 

1598 

1735 
1959 
1815 

1870 



BLUE RIBBON MERRIE MELODIES 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

9301 A Feud There Was 9-11-43 1543 

9302 Early Worm Gets the Bird. 10-2-43 1576 

9303 My Little Buckaroo 11-6-43 1637 

9304 Fighting 69'/ 2 12-4-43 1677 

9305 Cross Country Detours 1-15-44 1726 

9306 Hiawatha's Rabbit Hunt. .2-12-44 1754 

9307 The Bear's Tale 3-11-44 1815 

9308 Sweet Sioux 4-8-44 1846 

9309 Of Fox and Hounds 5-13-44 1887 

9310 Thugs with Dirty Mugs 6-3-44 1959 

9311 A Wild Hare 6-17-44 1959 

9312 The Cat Came Back 7-15-44 .... 

9313 Isle of Pingo Pongo 8-19-44 



MERRIE MELODIES CARTOONS (Color) 
(Average 7 Minutes) 

8725 Little Red Riding 

Rabbit 1-1-44 1659 

8726 What's Cookin', Doe? 1-8-44 1659 



1943-44 

9701 Meatless Fly-Day 1-29-44 1735 

9702 Tom Turk & Daffy 2-12-44 1743 

9703 I Got Plenty of Mutton. . .3- 1 1 -44 1803 

9704 The Weekly Reporter 3-25-44 1815 

9705 Tick Took Tuckered 4-8-44 1846 

9706 The Swooner Crooner 5-6-44 1911 

9707 Russian Rhapsody 5-20-44 1911 

9708 Duck Soup to Nuts 5-27-44 1911 

9709 Angel Puss 6-3-44 1959 

9710 Slightly Daffy 6-17-44 1959 

9711 Brother Brat 7-15-44 

9712 Plane Daffy 8-12-44 

9713 Birdy and the Beast 8-26-44 



Prod. Rel. 
No. Title Date 

"BUGS BUNNY" SPECIALS 

(7 Minutes) 

9721 Bugs Bunny and the Three 

Bears 2-26-44 

9722 Bugs Bunny Nipt the 

Nips 4-22-44 

9723 Hare Ribbln' 6-24-44 

8724 Hare Force 7-29-44 

SANTE FE TRAIL WESTERNS 
(Average 20 Minutes) 

9107 Oklahoma Outlaws 9-4-43 

9108 Wagon Wheels West 10-30-43 

9109 Gun to Gun 1-8-44 

9110 Roaring Guns 2-19-44 

9111 Wells Fargo Days 4-1-44 

9112 Trial by Trigger 5-27-44 

VITAPHONE VARIETIES 
(Average 10 Minutes) 

9401 Our Alaskan Frontier 11-13-43 

9402 Bees A'Buzzin' 9-18-43 

9403 Hunting the Devil Cat. .. 1-22-44 

9404 Struggle for Life 3-4-44 

9405 Jungle Thrills 4-15-44 

9406 Throwing the Bull 7-29-44 



P.D. 
Page 



1543 
1596 
1726 
1754 
1 870 
1911 



1637 
1598 
1718 
1803 
1870 



OFFICIAL U. S. VICTORY FILMS 
(Distributed by Various Major Exchanges) 

Day of Battle 1617 

Suggestion Box 1617 

Chief Neely Reports to the Nation 1659 

Brothers in Blood 1659 

Family Feud 1659 

Food and Magle 1659 

Destination: Island X 1967 

No Exceptions 1726 

This Is Worth Fighting For 1743 

At His Side 1803 

Prices Unlimited 1838 

The Why of Wartime Taxes 1838 

The Negro Soldier 1846 

America's Hidden Weapon 1846 

Road to Victory 1911 

It's Your War, Too 1922 

No Alternative 1922 

Reward Unlimited 1959 

Skirmish at the Front 1959 

Movies at War 1959 

BRITISH MINISTRY OF INFORMATION 

Common Cause 1534 

Women of Britain 1534 

I Was a Fireman 1677 

Before the Raid 1697 

Naples at War 1946 

Lili Marlene 1946 

MISCELLANEOUS 
War in the Mediterranean 

(English Films) 1415 

Trade Horizons (Scheftel) 1677 

Avengers Over Europe 1697 

(Telenews) 

Parade of the Past 1870 

(Fun Film) 

Cameramen at War (Astor) 1946 



SERIALS 
COLUMBIA 

5120 The Batman 7-16-43 1415 

(15 episodes) 
5160 The Phantom 12-24-43 1697 

(15 episodes) 
5140 The Desert Hawk 7-7-44 

(15 episodes) 



REPUBLIC 

381 The Masked Marvel 11-6-43 1576 

(12 episodes) 

382 Captain America 1-29-44 1718 

(15 episodes) 

383 Tiger Woman 5-27-44 1911 

(12 episodes) 



UNIVERSAL 



8681-93 Don Wlnslow of the 

Coast Guard 7-6-43 1227 

(13 episodes) 
8781-93 Adventures of the 

Flying Cadets 9-7-43 1557 

(13 episodes) 
S88I Great Alaskan Mystery. . .4-25-44 1870 

(13 episodes) 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY ' 944 



1973 



THE RELEASE CHART 



Index to Reviews, Advance Synopses and 
Service Data in PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION 



Release dates and running time are furnished as soon as avail- 
able. Advance dates are tentative and subject to change. Run- 
ning times are the official times supplied by the distributor. 

All page numbers on this chart refer to pages in the 
PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION of MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 

Consult Service Data in the PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION for 



Legion of Decency Rating, Audience Classification and Managers' 
Round Table Exploitation. 

Short Subjects Chart with Synopsis Index can be found on 
pages 1972-1973. 

Feature Product Including Coming Attractions, listed by Com- 
pany, in order of release, on pages 1960-1961. 



Prod. 

Title Company Number 

ABOVE Suspicion MGM 402 

Abroad with Two Yanks UA .... 

Action in Arabia RKO 420 

Address Unknown Col. 5010 

Adventure in Iraq WB 304 

Adventure in Music Crystal .... 

Adventures of a Rookie RKO 402 

Adventures of Mark Twain WB 315 

Adventures of Tartu (British) MGM 406 
Ali Baba and 40 Thieves (color) Univ. 8003 

Allergic to Love Univ. .... 

Always a Bridesmaid Univ. 8023 

Amazing Mr. Forrest, The (Br.) PRC 413 
American Romance, An (color) MGM .... 

And Now Tomorrow Para. .... 

And the Angels Sing Para. 432 1 

Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble MGM 42< 

Animal Kingdom, The WB .... 

Are These Our Parents? Mono. .... 

Arizona Trail Univ. 808 

Arizona Whirlwind Mono. .... 

Around the World RKO 41 i 

Arsenic and Old Lace WB 

Atlantic City Rep. 
Attack OWI-RKO 

BANJO on My Knee (R.) 20th-Fox 407 

Bar 20 UA 

Bathing Beauty (color) MGM .... 

Battle of China, The War Dept 

Battle of Russia 20th-Fox 

Battleship Blues Col. 

Beautiful But Broke Col. 

Beautiful Michoacan (Mex.) Mohme 

Bell Bottom George (British) Col. 

Belle of the Yukon (color) RKO 

Beneath Western Skies Rep. 

Bermuda Mystery 20th-Fox 

Best Foot Forward (color) MGM 

Between Two Worlds WB 

Beyond the Last Frontier Rep. 

Big Show, The (Reissue) Rep. 

Black Hills Express Rep. 

Black Parachute, The Col. 

Blazing Frontier PRC 

Bombers Moon 20th-Fox 

Boss of Boom Town Univ. 

Boss of Rawhide PRC 

Bowery to Broadway Univ. 

Brand of the Devil PRC 

Brazil R e p„ 

Bride by Mistake RKO 

(formerly That Hunter Girl) 
Bridge of San Luis Rey, The 
Bring On the Girls (color) 
Broadway Rhythm (color) 
Brother Rat (Reissue) 
Buffalo Bill (color) 



CALIFORNIA j oe 

Call of the Jungle 
Call of the Rockies 
Call of the South Seas 
Calling Dr. Death 
Candlelight In Algeria (Br.) 
Candles at Nine (British) 
Canterbury Tale fBritish) 
Canterville Ghost, The 

1974 



UA 
Para. 
MGM 
WB 
20th-Fox 

Rep. 
Mono. 
Rep. 
Rep. 
Univ. 
20th-Fox 
Nat'l-Anglo 
Eagle-Lion 
MGM 



414 

5022 



354 
428 
405 
316 
351 

3302 
362 

5035 
459 
401 

8085 
452 

458 



419 
343 
424 

365 

356 
319 
8026 
432 



Release 

Stan Date 

Joan Crawford-Fred MacMurray Sept.,'43 

William Bendix-Dennis O'Keefe Aug. 4,'44 

George Sanders-Virginia Bruce Block 4 

Paul Lukas-Mady Christians June I, '44 

John Loder-Ruth Ford Oct. 9,'43 

Classical Music Feature Mar. 10, '44 

Wally Brown-Alan Carney Block I 

Fredric March-Alexis Smith July 22, '44 

Robert Donat-Valerie Hobson Oct.,'43 

Jon Hall-Maria Montez Jan. I4,'44 

Martha O'Driscoll-Noah Beery, Jr. July 2 1, '44 

Andrew Sisters-Patric Knowles Sept. 24/43 

Edward E. Horton-Jack Buchanan Mar. 29, '44 

Brian Donlevy-Ann Richard Special 

Loretta Young-Alan Ladd 1944-45 

Fred MacMurray-Dorothy Lamour Block 5 

Mickey Rooney-Lewis Stone May, '44 

Ann Sheridan-Olivia de Havilland 1944-45 

Helen Vinson-Lyle Talbot July 1 5, '44 

Tex Ritter-Fuzzy Knight Sept. 24,'43 

Ken Maynard-Hoot Gibson Mar. 1 8, '44 

Kay Kyser-Joan Davis-Mischa Auer Block 3 

Cary Grant-Raymond Massey 1944-45 

Constance Moore-Bradford Taylor Not Set 

War Documentary June 1 2, '44 



Barbara Stanwyck-Joel McCrea Oct. 29,'43 

William Boyd-Andy Clyde Oct. I, '43 

Red Skelton-Esther Williams Block 8 

Documentary Not Set 

Documentary Nov. 5, '43 

Kay Kyser-Ann Miller-Victor Moore Not Set 

Joan Davis-Jane Frazee Jan. 28, '44 

Tito Guizar-Gloria Marin Apr. 25, '44 

George Formby Not Set 

Randolph Scott-Gypsy Rose Lee Not Set 

Bob Livingston-Smiley Burnette Mar. 3, '44 

Preston Foster-Ann Rutherford May, '44 

Lucille Ball-William Gaxton Oct.,'43 

John Garfield-Paul Henreid May 20,'44 

Eddie Dew-Smiley Burnette Sept. 1 8, '43 

Gene Autry Mar. I, '44 

Don Barry-Wally Vernon Aug. I5,'43 

John Carradine-Larry Parks May 4,'44 

Buster Crabbe-Al St. John Sept. I, '43 

George Montgomery-Annabella Aug. 6, '43 

Rod Cameron-Vivian Austin May 26, '44 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill Nov. 20/43 

Contract Players Not Set 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill July 30, '44 

Virginia Bruce-Tito Guizar Not Set 

Laraine Day-Alan Marshall Not Set 

Lynn Bari-Akim Tamiroff Feb. 1 1, '44 

Veronica Lake-Sonny Tufts 1944-45 

George Murphy-Ginny Simms Mar.,'44 

Priscilla Lane-Wayne Morris July 1 5, '44 

Maureen O'Hara-Joel McCrea Apr.,'44 

Don Barry-Helen Talbot Dec. 29,'43 

Ann Corio-James Bush July 29, '44 

Smiley Burnette-Sonny Carson July 14, '44 

Janet Martin-Allan Lane July 7,'44 

Lon Chaney-Patricia Morison Dec. I7,'43 

James Mason-Carla Lehmann July/44 

Jessie Matthews Not Set 

Eric Portman-Sheila Sim Not Set 

Charles Laughton-Margaret O'Brien Block 8 



r- REVIEWED -> 

M. P. Product 

Running Herald Digest 

Time Issue Page 

90m May 1/43 1546 

75 m Feb. 19/44 1762 

72m Apr. 29/44 1866 

64m Sept. 25/43 1553 

62m Mar. 25/44 1814 

64m Aug. 21/43 1547 

130m May 6/44 1877 

103m Aug. 7/43 1546 

87m Jan. 15/44 1713 

66m May 6/44 1877 

61m Oct. 2/43 1566 

71m 

I5lm July 1/44 1969 

96m Apr. 22/44 1858 

107m Apr. 8/44 1833 

73 m June 17/44 1945 

57m 

59m Apr. 15/44 1845 

81m Nov. 27/43 1645 

56 m June 10/44 1933 



95m 
54m 
101m 
65m 
80m 



55m 

57 m 

63 m 
85m 

86m 

95 m 



Dec. 5/36 
July 24/43 
June 3/44 
May 20/44 
Nov. 6/43 



Jan. 8/44 

June 10/44 

, Dec. 18/43 
Jan. 1/44 
July 1/44 
May 13/44 
May 27/44 



1585 
1559 
1922 
1897 
1615 



74m Feb. 5/44 1742 

106m May 6/44 1878 

97m Jan. 29/44 1734 

56m May 20/44 1898 

65m Apr. 22/44 1858 

94m July 3/43 1532 

1 12m May 13/44 1885 

55m Sept. 11/43 1529 

71m 

55m Aug. 7/43 1546 

65m June 17/44 1946 

59m Apr. 15/44 1845 

70m July 10/43 1532 

59ni 

107m Feb. 5/44 1742 

1 15m Jan. 22/44 i 725 

89m Oct. 15/38 1957 

90m Mar. 18/44 1801 



1706 

1934 

1673 
1694 
1970 
1885 
1909 



Advance Service 
Synopsis Data 
Page Page 

1081 1575 
1889 

1746 1847 

1695 1947 
1530 

1471 \t>\7 

936 1947 
1655 

1457 1902 

I 192 .... 

1747 

1457 

1715 

1555 

1456 1947 
1431 

1923 
1545 
1 746 

1457 1902 
1806 

1899 



1635 



1899 
1696 



1766 



1835 
1746 
1835 

1191 1617 
1646 



1457 
1806 
1531 
1305 
1923 
1599 
1923 
1923 
1971 
1890 



1947 



1636 
1763 

1616 1947 



1531 

1675 
1913 
1923 
1899 
1635 



1635 



1947 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1944 



■ REVIEWED 



Title Company 

Canyon City Rep. 

Career Girl PRC 

Casanova Brown RKO 

Casanova in Burlesque Rep. 

Chance of a Lifetime, The Col. 
Charlie Chan in Secret Service Mono. 
Charlie Chan in The Chinese Cat Mono. 

Cherokee Strip (Reissue) WB 

Chip Off the Old Block Univ. 

Christmas Holiday Univ. 

Cinderella Jones WB 

City That Stopped Hitler Para. 
Claudia 20th-Fox 

Climax, The (color) Univ. 

Coastal Command (British) RKO 

Cobra Woman (color) Univ. 
Comin" Round the Mountain 

(Reissue) Rep. 

Conflict WB 

Conspirators, The WB 

Contender, The PRC 

Corvette K-225 Univ. 
Courageous Mr. Penn (Br.) Hoffberg 

Cover Girl (color) Col. 

Cowboy Canteen Col. 

Cowboy in the Clouds Col. 
Cowboy and the Senorita, The Rep. 

Crazy House Univ. 

Crime by Night WB 
Crime Doctor's Strangest Case Col. 

Crime School (Reissue) WB 

Cross of Lorraine, The MGM 

Cry "Havoc" MGM 

Cry of the Werewolf Col. 

Curse of the Cat People RKO 

DANCING Masters, The 20th-Fox 

Dangerl Women at Work PRC 

Days of Glory RKO 

Death Valley Manhunt Rep. 

Death Valley Rangers Mono. 

Death Walks Alone Col. 

Deerslayer, The Rep. 

Delinquent Daughters PRC 

Desert Song, The (color) WB 

Destination, Toyko WB 

Detective Kitty O'Day Mono. 

Devil Riders, The PRC 

Dixie Showboat PRC 

Double Furlough UA 

(formerly With All My Heart) 

Double Indemnity Para. 

Doughboys in Ireland Col. 

Doughgirls, The WB 

Dragon Seed MGM 

Drifter. The PRC 

Dr. Gillespie's Criminal Case MGM 

Dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels Frank 

Drums of Fu Manchu Rep. 

EMPTY Holsters (Reissue) WB 

Escape to Danger (British) RKO 
Eve of St. Mark, The 20th-Fox 

Ever Since Venus Col. 



GAMBLER'S Choice Para. 

Gang's All Here, The (color) 20th-Fox 

Gangway for Tomorrow RKO 

Gaslight MGM 



Prod. Release 

Number Start Date 

364 Don Barry-Helen Talbot Nov.29,'43 

403 Frances Langford-Craig Wood Jan. 1 1, '44 
Gary Cooper-Teresa Wright Not Set 

333 Joe E. Brown-June Havoc Feb. 1 9, '44 

5034 Chester Morris-Jeanne Bates Oct. 26,'43 

.... Sidney Toler-Gwen Kenyon Feb. I4,'44 

Sidney Toler-Joan Woodbury May 20, '44 

333 Dick Foran Oct. 2,'43 

8011 Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan Feb. 25, '44 

.... Deanna Durbin-Gene Kelly June 30,'44 

Joan Leslie-Robert Alda 1944-45 

4331 Russian Documentary Special 

404 Dorothy McGuire-Robert Young Sept. 3, '43 
.... Susanna Foster-Boris Karloff Not Set 
.... Documentary Not Set 

8006 Jon Hall-Maria Montez May I2,'44 

3305 Gene Autry July 1 5, '44 

.... Humphrey Bogart-Alexis Smith 1944-45 

Hedy Lamarr-Paul Henreid 1944-45 

418 Buster Crabbe-Arline Judge May I0,"44 

8007 Randolph Scott-James Brown Oct I, '43 
Clifford Evans-Deborah Kerr Dec. 22,'43 

5001 Rita Hayworth-Gene Kelly Apr. 6,'44 

5220 Charles Starrett-Jane Frazee Feb. 8,'44 

5203 Charles Starrett-Julie Duncan Dec. 23,'43 

342 Roy Rogers-Dale Evans-Mary Lee May 1 2, '44 

8005 Olsen and Johnson Oct. 8,'43 

Jane Wyman-Jerome Cowan 1944-45 

5021 Warner Baxter-Lynn Merrick Dec. 9,'43 

327 Humphrey Bogart-Dead End Kids Dec. 4,'43 

414 Pierre Aumont-Gene Kelly Jan., '44 

417 Margaret Sullavan-Ann Sothern Feb.. '44 
.... Osa Massen-Stephen Crane Aug. 1 7, '44 

418 Simone Simon-Kent Smith Block 4 

413 Laurel and Hardy Nov. 1 9, '43 

411 Patsy Kelly-Mary Brian Aug. 23, '43 

422 Tamara Toumanova-Gregory Peck Block 5 

375 Bill Elliott-Gabby Hayes ' Sept.25,'43 

.... Hoot Gibson-Ken Maynard Dec. 3, '43 

Rose Hobart-William Wright Aug. 1 7, '44 

306 Bruce Kellogg-Jean Parker Nov. 22,'43 

416 June Carlson-Fifi D'Orsay July 1 5, '44 

310 Dennis Morgan-Irene Manning Jan. 29, '44 

309 Cary Grant-John Garfield Jan. I, '44 

.... Jean Parker-Tim Ryan May 13/44 

460 Buster Crabbe-AI St. John Nov. 5,'43 
.... Frances Langford-Guy Kibbee Not Set 
.... Ginger Rogers-Joseph Cotten Not Set 

4325 Barbara Stanwyck-Fred MacMurray Block 5 

5031 Kenny Baker-Jeff Donnell Oct. 7,'43 

.... Ann Sheridan-Alexis Smith 1944-45 

.... Katharine Hepburn-Walter Huston Special 

461 Buster Crabbe-AI St. John Dec. 20,'43 
407 Lionel Barrymore-Van Johnson Nov., '43 

.... Paul Ardor-Claudia Drake-Donald Woods Not Set 



305 Henry Brandon-William Royle 



334 
419 
429 



FALCON and the Coeds, The RKO 410 

Falcon in Mexico, The RKO .... 

Falcon Out West, The RKO 

Fallen Sparrow, The RKO 

False Colors UA 
Fanny by Gaslight (Brit.) Gains. -GFD 

Farewell, My Lovely RKO 

Fighting Seabees, The Rep. 

Find the Blackmailer WB 

Fired Wife Univ. 

Flesh and Fantasy Univ. 

Follow the Boys Univ. 

Follow the Leader Mono. 

Forty Thieves UA 
For Whom the Bell Tolls (color) Para. 

Four Jills in a Jeep 20th-Fox 

Frenchman's Creek (color) Para. 

Frisco Kid (Reissue) WB 

Frontier Law Univ. 

Frontier Outlaws PRC 

Fugitive from Sonora Rep. 

Fuzzy Settles Down PRC 



421 
401 



311 
306 
8017 
8062 
8061 



4338 
423 

325 
8082 
462 
361 
465 

4324 
416 
407 
425 



Dick Foran 

Eric Portman-Ann Dvorak 
Michael O'Shea-Anne Baxter 
Alan Mowbray-Ann Savage 

Tom Conway-Jean Brooks 
Tom Conway-Mona Maris 
Tom Conway-Barbara Hale 
Maureen O'Hara-John Garfield 
William Boyd 

Phyllis Calvert-James Mason 
Dick Powell-Anne Shirley 
John Wayne-Susan Hayward 
Faye Emerson-Jerome Cowan 
Robert Paige-Louise Allbritton 
Charles Boyer-Barbara Stanwyck 
Stage and Screen Entertainers 
East Side Kids 
William Boyd-Andy Clyde 
Gary Cooper-lngrid Bergman 
Kay Francis-Carole Landis 
Joan Fontaine-Arturo de Cordova 
James Cagney-Margaret Lindsay 
Russell Hayden-Jennifer Holt 
Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 
Don Barry-Lynn Merrick 
Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 

Chester Morris-Nancy Kelly 
Alice Faye-Carmen Miranda 
Margo-Robert Ryan-John Carradine 
Charles Boyer-lngrid Bergman 



Nov. 27,'43 

Oct. 2,'43 
Block 4 



Running 
Time 
55m 
69m 



M. P. 
Herald 
Issue 
Nov. 13/43 
Dec. I8,'43 



Product 
Digest 
Page 
1626 

1674 



72m Jan. 29,'44 1733 

65m Oct. I6,'43 1586 

65m Jan. 15, '44 1714 

65m Apr. I, '44 1826 

56m ... 

81m Feb. I9,'44 1761 

92m June 10/44 1934 

57m Sept. 4/43 1521 

9lm Aug. 21/43 1558 

60m Nov. 14/42 1005 

70m Apr. 29/44 1866 

66m May 13/44 1886 

99m Oct. 2/43 1565 

78m Jan. 1/44 1694 

1 07m Mar. 11/44 1793 

72m Feb. 26/44 1774 

55m Jan. 8/44 1706 

78m Apr. 1/44 1825 

80m Oct. 23/43 1595 



68m 
86m 
90m 
97m 



Jan. 22/44 
May 7/38 
Nov. 13/43 
Nov. 6/43 



70m Feb. 19/44 

63m Oct. 30/43 

61m July 17/43 

86m Apr. 22/44 

55m Aug. 28/43 

59m Dec. 18/43 

67m Nov. 6/43 



96m 
135m 
63m 
58m 



106m 
61m 



62m 
89m 



Dec. 18/43 
Dec. 25/43 
Apr. 1/44 
Feb. 12/44 



Apr. 29/44 
Oct. 9/43 



May 27/44 
May 8/43 



68m Nov. 13/43 



62 m 
83m 



Feb. 5/44 



1725 
1626 
1625 
1614 

1762 

1605 
1426 
1858 
1558 
1674 

1615 

1673 
1685 

:! 826 

1754 



1866 
1574 



1910 
1546 

1626 



1742 



Aaia^i 
Synopsi. 
Page 
1599 
1634 
1806 
1676 
1545 
1599 



1715 
1695 
1746 



1786 
1457 



1456 
1850 
1850 
1240 

1416 
1763 
1636 
1747 
1531 
1091 
1654 

1457 
1555 
1958 
1715 

1555 

1636 
1402 
1555 
1958 
1599 
1913 
872 
1530 

1566 
1835 
1913 

1646 
1545 
1835 
1675 
1606 
1192 
1599 
1606 



Service 
Data 
Page 



1902 



1655 
1655 



1655 



June/44 


96m 


May 20/44 


1897 


1636 


1947 


Not Set 








1971 




Block 2 


68m 


Nov. 6/43 


1615 


I 599 




Not Set 








1971 




Block 5 


64m 


Mar. 4/44 


i782 






Block 1 


93m 


Aug. 21/43 


1547 


M82 


1719 


Nov. 5/43 


65m 


Nov. 6/43 


1-614 


1431 




Not Set 


108m 


May 27/44 


1910 






Not Set 








1971 




Mar. 10/44 


100m 


Jan. 22/44 


i 725 


1616 


1847 


Nov. 6/43 


55m 


Oct. 23/43 


1594 






Sept. 3/43 


73m 


Sept. 4/43 


1521 






Oct. 29/43 


94m 


Sept. 18/43 


1541 


1058 


1766 


Not Set 


1 19m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1635 


1947 


June 3/44 


65m 


July 1/44 


1970 


1606 




June 23/44 


60m 


June 24/44 


1958 






Special 


168m 


July i7,'43 


1546 


855 


1719 


Mar.,*44 


89m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 


1676 


1947 


1 944-45 








1416 




Mar. 4/44 


77m 


Nov. 2/35 


i726 






Nov. 5/43 


55m 






1606 




Mar. 4/44 


58m 






1746 




July 1/43 


55m 


July 10/43 


1414 


1375 




July 25/44 








1937 




Block 5 


66m 


Apr. 29/44 


1867 


1850 




Dec. 24 '43 


103m 


Dec. 4/43 


1653 


1530 


1847 


Block 2 


69 m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1566 




May, '44 


1 14m 


May 16/44 


1885 


1786 


1947 



10TION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



1975 



Prod. 



l'itle 


Company 


Numbe 


Ghost Catchers, The 


Univ. 




Ghost Ship, The 


RKO 


A\2 


Ghost That Walks Alone, The 


Col. 


5042 


Gildersleeve on Broadway 


RKO 


409 


Gildersleeve's Ghost 


RKO 


426 


Girl Crazy 


MGM 


409 


Girl from Monterrey, The 


PRC 


412 


Girl in the Case, The 


Col. 


5028 


Girls on Probation (Reissue) 


WB 


328 


Girl Who Dared, The 


Rep. 


322 


Going My Way 


Para. 


4335 


Gold Town 


MGM 




Good Fellows, The 


Para. 


4302 


Good-night, Sweetheart 


Rep. 


320 


Government Girl 


RKO 


408 


Goyescas (Spanish) 


RKO 


461 


Great Moment, The 


Para. 


4330 


Great Mr. Handel, The (color) 




(British) 


Midfilrr 




Greenwich Village (color) 


20th-Fox 




Guadalcanal Diary 


20th-Fox 


412 


Gung Ho 


Univ. 


8064 


Gunsmoke Mesa 


PRC 


453 


Guns of the Law 


PRC 


455 


Guns of the Pecos (Reissue) 


WB 


335 


Guy Named Joe, A 


MGM 


416 


Gypsy Wildcat (color) 


Univ. 





Release 

Start Date 

Olsen and Johnson June 16, '44 

Richard Dix-Edith Barrett Block 3 

Arthur Lake-Lynn Roberts Feb. I0,'44 

Harold Peary-Billis Burke Block 2 

Harold Peary-Marion Martin Block 6 

Mickey Rooney-Judy Garland Nov.,'43 

Armida-Edgar Kennedy Oct. 4, '43 

Edmund Lowe-Janis Carter Apr. 20, '44 

Jane Bryan-Ronald Reagan Dec. 4, '43 

Lorna Gray-Peter Cookson Aug. 5, '44 

Bing Crosby-Rise Stevens Special 

Wallace Beery-Binnie Barnes Not Set 

Cecil Kellaway-Helen Walker Block I 

Bob Livingston-Ruth Terry June 1 7, '44 

Olivia de Havilland-Sonny Tufts Block 2 

Musical Feature Special 

Joel McCrea-Betty Field Block 6 

Wilfred Lawson-Elizabeth Allan Sept. 9/43 

Don Ameche-Carmen Miranda 1944-45 

Preston Foster-William Bendix Nov. 5, '43 

Randolph Scott-Grace McDonald Dec. 3 1, '43 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill Jan. 3, '44 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill Apr. 10, '44 

Dick Foran Oct. 2,"43 

Spencer Tracy-Irene Dunne Mar.'44 

Maria Montei-Jon Hall Not Set 



HAIL the Conquering Hero 


Para. 


4JZO 


tddie Dracken-tila Kaines 


block o 


Hail to the Rangers 


Col. 


9ZUI 


Charles atarrett 


iept. lo, 43 


Hairy Ape, The 


UA 




NA/illiam Bendix-Susan Hayward 


June 1 6, 44 


Halfway House, The (British) 


Ealing 




Francoise Rosay-Mervyn Johns 


Not Set 


Hands Across the Border 


Rep. 


34i 


Roy Rogers-Ruth Terry 


Jan. 5,"44 


Happy Land 


20th-Fox 


415 


Don Ameche-Frances Dee 


Dec, 3,"43 


Harvest Melody 


PRC 


402 


Rosemary Lane-Johnny Downs 


Nov. 22,'43 


Hat-Check Honey 


Univ. 


8031 


Grace McDonald-Leon Errol 


Mar. 10/44 


Having a Wonderful Crime 


RKO 




Pat O'Brien-George Murphy 


Not Set 


Heat's On, The 


Col. 


5009 


Mae West-Victor Moore 


Dec. 2/43 


Heaven Can Wait (color) 


20th-Fox 


402 


Don Ameche-Gene Tierney 


Aug. 13/43 


Heaven Is Around the Corner 








(British) Nat'l-Anglo 




Will Fyffe-Leni Lynn 


Not Set 


Heavenly Body, The 


MGM 


421 


William Powell-Hedy Lamarr 


Apr.,'44 


Heavenly Days 


RKO 




Fibber McGee and Molly 


Not Set 


Henry Aldrich, Boy Scout 


Para. 


43 ii 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 3 


Henry Aldrich Haunts a House Para. 


4306 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 2 


Henry Aldrich's Little Secret 


Fara. 


4328 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 6 


Henry Aldrich Plays Cupid 


Para. 


4322 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 5 


Here Comes Elmer 


Rep. 


303 


Al Pearce-Dale Evans 


Nov. 15/43 


Heroes Are Made (Russian) 


Artkino 




Russian Feature 


Mar. 15/44 


Her Primitive Man 


Univ. 


8016 


Louise Allbritton-Robert Paige 


Apr. 2 1/44 


Hey, Rookie 


Col. 


5013 


Ann Miller-Larry Parks 


Mar. 9/44 


Hidden Valley Outlaws 


Rep. 


378 


Bill Elliott-Gabby Hayes 


Apr. 2/44 


Hi Diddle Diddle 


UA 




Martha Scott-Adolphe Menjou 


Aug. 20/43 


Hi Good-Lookin' 


Univ. 


8044 


Eddie Quillan-Harriet Milliard 


Mar. 24/44 


Higher and Higher 


RKO 


415 


Michele Morgan-Frank Sinatra 


Block 3 


His Butler's Sister 


Univ. 


8004 


Deanna Durbin-Franchot Tone 


Nov. 26/43 


Hitler Gang, The 


Para. 


4323 


Robert Watson-Victor Varconi 


Block 5 


Hi Ya Sailor 


Univ. 


8035 


Donald Woods-Elyse Knox 


Oct. 15/43 


Holy Matrimony 


20th-Fox 


403 


Monty Woolley-Gracie Fields 


Aug 27/43 


Home in Indiana (color) 


20th-Fox 


433 


Walter Brennan-Lon McAllister 


July/44 


Hoosier Holiday 


Rep. 


302 


Dale Evans-George Byron 


Sept. 13/43 


Horn Blows at Midnight, The 


WB 




Jack Benny-Alexis Smith 


1944-45 


Hostages 


Para. 


4305 


Luise Rainer-William ' Bendix 


Block 1 


Hotel Reserve (British) 


RKO 




James Mason-Lucie Mannheim 


Not Set 


Hot Rhythm 


Mono. 




Dona Drake-Robert Lowery 


Apr. 22/44 


Hour Before the Dawn, The 


Para. 


4317 


Veronica Lake-Franchot Tone 


Block 4 



I DOOD It MGM 

I Love a Soldier Para. 

I Married a Stranger Mono. 

Impatient Years, The Col. 

Impostor, The Univ. 

Incendiary Blonde (color) Para. 

In Old Chicago (Reissue) 20th-Fox 

In Old Oklahoma Rep. 

In Our Time WB 

In the Meantime, Darling 20th-Fox 
Invisible Man's Revenge, The Univ. 
Irish Eyes Are Smiling (color) 20th-Fox 

Iron Major, The RKO 

Is Everybody Happy? Col. 

Isle of Forgotten Sins PRC 

It Happened Tomorrow UA 



403 

4329 



8066 

406 
307 
311 



406 
5016 
401 



Red Skelton-Eleanor Powell 
Paulette Goddard-Sonny Tufts 
Dean Jagger-Neil Hamilton 



Sept.,'43 
Block 6 
Not Set 



Jean Arthur-Lee Bowman-Charles Coburn Not Set 

Jean Gabin-Allyn Joslyn Feb. 11/44 

Betty Hutton-Arturo de Cordova 1944-45 
Alice Faye-Tyrone Power-Don Ameche Oct. 29/43 

John Wayne-Martha Scott Dec. 6/43 

Ida Lupino-Paul Henreid Feb. 19/44 

Jeanne Crain-Frank Latimore 1944-45 

Jon Hall-Evelyn Ankers June 9/44 

Monty Woolley-Dick Haymes 1944-45 

Pat O'Brien-Ruth Warrick Block 2 

Ted Lewis-Nan Wynn Oct. 28/43 

John Carradine-Gale Sondergaard Aug. 15/43 

Dick Powell-Linda Darnell Apr. 7/44 



JACK London 
Jamboree 
Jam Session 
Jane Eyre 
Janie 



UA .... Michael O'Shea-Susan Hayward Dec. 24/43 

Rep. 316 George Byron-Ruth Terry May 5/44 

Col. 5015 Ann Miller-Jess Barker Apr. 13/44 

20th-Fox 420 Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine Feb.,'44 

WB Joyce Reynolds-Robert Hutton 1944-45 



1976 



r— REVIEWED 





M. P. 


Product 


Advance 


Servtct 


UtltlttlR 


n r Talu 


Digest 


\ aim/1 4rt it 
•j ytlU ffili 


Data 




Issue 


rage 


t age 


Page 


68m 


June 10/44 


1935 


1835 




69m 


Dec. 11/43 


1666 


1646 




63 m 


Feb. 19/44 


1762 


1696 




65m 


Oct. 23/43 


1595 


1566 




64 m 


June 24/44 


1957 


1786 




99m 


Aug. 7/43 


1558 


1 191 


1766 


61m 


Sept. 25/43 


1554 


1509 




64m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1806 




63 m 


Oct. 29/38 


1626 












1899 




126m 


Feb. 26/44 


1773 


1763 










1849 




70m 


Aug. 14/43 


1559 


1191 




67m 


June 10/44 


1935 


1850 




93 m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1416 


1766 


110m 


May 20/44 


1898 






83m 


June 10/44 


1934 


912 




89m 


Sept. 18/43 


1542 










...» 


1676 




93m 


Oct. 30/43 


1605 


1457 


1766 


88m 


Dec. 25/43 


1686 


1599 


1847 


59m 


June 17/44 


1946 


1635 




55m 






1806 




56m 










120m 


Dec. 25/43 


1686 


1431 


1902 








1675 




101m 


June 10/44 


1933 


1696 




57m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 


1055 




91m 


May 20/44 


1897 


1763 




95m 


Mar. 4/44 


1781 






73m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


1545 




75m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


1555 


1766 


71m 


Oct. 9/43 


1574 


1545 




69m 


Mar. 1/44 


1794 


1746 










1971 




79m 


Dec. 4/43 


1653 


1555 


1818 


1 12m 


July 24/43 


1578 


1240 


1617 


100m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 






94m 


Jan. 1/44 


1693 


1555 


1947 








1817 




65 m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1696 


1902 


73m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1566 


1766 


75m 


June 10/44 


1933 


1747 




65m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1431 




74m 


Oct. 16/43 


1585 






74m 


Mar. 25/44 


1813 






79m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1675 




77m 


May 6/44 


1877 


1654 




55m 


Apr. 8/44 


1834 


1806 




73m 


July 31/43 


1559 


1375 


1617 


62m 


Mar. 18/44 


1801 


1763 




90m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


1616 


1847 


93 m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


1555 


1766 


100m 


Apr. 29/44 


1865 


1675 




63m 


Oct. 9/43 


1574 


1531 




87m 


Aug. 28/43 


1547 


1431 


1655 


103m 


May 27/44 


1909 


1634 




72 m 


Aug. 28/43 


1547 












1715 




87m 


Aug. 14/43 


1579 


1277 


1766 


89m 


June 1 7/44 


1945 






/vm 


LJ jt % A A 

Mar. 4, 44 


1783 


1763 




74m 


Mar. 4/44 


1781 


1555 




102m 


July 31/43 


1579 


1 191 


1719 


106m 


June 10/44 


1934 


1675 










1971 










1849 




94m 


Feb. 12/44 


i 754 


1616 


1847 








1675 




94m 


Jan. 8/38 


1542 






102m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 




1719 


! 10m 


Feb. 5/44 


1741 


1416 


1902 








1850 




78m 


June 3/44 


\92i 


1849 










1835 




85m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 


1555 


1719 


78m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 


* 1545 


1655 


84m 


July 3/43 


1532 


1339 


1617 


84m 


Mar. 25/44 


1813 


1675 


1947 


93m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1554 


1847 


71m 


A n . 1 t AA 


1 0/5 


1817 




77m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1806 


1947 


96m 


Feb. 5/44 


1741 


1240 


1847 



1747 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1944 



r— REVIEWED —> 















M. P. 


Product 


Advance 


Service 






Prod. 




Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synopsis 


Data 


Title 


Company 


Number 


Start 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Page 


1 ainniA I Bri+i^n 1 
-J 9 a n n i o \ v i i 1 1 s 1 1 j 


English 




DArhflrA MuliAn*Mir*nAAl R annrM va 

•va i *vai a iviuii sit ivi iwiiuoi i\oy ui ovo 


Oct. 1 '43 


85m 


Aug. 23, '43 


1593 






jive junwiiun 


PRC 


407 


IJ i f* x i A nA rtnrA.Ti n a Tnauor 
uivhio iviuuro i ma i riayer 


Dor 20 '4^ 


64m 


Nov 20 '43 

1 — \J t • a»Vi t %i 


1633 


1606 




Johnny Come Lately 


UA 




James Cagney-Grace George 


Sept. 3,'43 


97m 


Aug. 28.'43 


1559 


1375 


1719 


Johnny Doesn't Live Here 


















Any More 


Mono. 




Simone Simon-James Ellison 


July 8.'44 


79m 


May I3/44 


1886 


1826 




Jungle Woman 


Univ. 




Evelyn Anlcers-J. Carrol Naish 


July 7,'44 


60m 


May 27,'44 


1910 


1899 




KANSAN, The 


UA 




Rieharrl Dlv- Ia-ia Wu>H 
r\i^imi u wiA'janB tv y cstt 


JopT. IV, 


79m 


June 19, '43 


1547 


1 182 




It a near (t^\/ It ittu 

\2ii5o5 wiiy ixiiiy 


Col. 






Nlnt *SAt 








1923 




rveys ot Trie Mnyuoni 


20th-Fo» 




xip 1^ a n r I /• HapHuji^ko.R a4/Ju K A It *tA#n 1 

Jir v.'cunc nara wicRc'iNoaoy rvi CfOWai 


1 944.45 








1806 




Kings of the Ring Le 


wis-Lesser 




Fight Film Feature 


Jan. 22,'44 


95 m 


Jan.29,'44 


1735 






Kismet ( color ) 


MGM 




Ronald Colman-Marlene Dietrich 


Not Set 








1635 




Klondike Kate 


Col. 


5029 


Ann Savage-Tom Neal 


Dec. I6,'43 


64m 


Feb. 5,'44 


1742 


1636 




Knickerbocker Holiday 


UA 




Nelson Eddy-Charles Coburn 


Mar. I7,'44 


85m 


Mar. 4,'44 


1781 


1635 


1818 


l_ r\ U trn m ^1 1 1 r Taw n 

i— ' » TrOm uur I own 


r\ TT KlnO 




K us si an reeture 


0<-t A '4? 


65m 


Oct. I6,'43 


1586 








Univ. 


8065 


I Apo44a Y/Min/I.l^^pa ninA ri^f/i apaM 

uoreTTa i oung-veraioine rnrzyeraiu 


Mar 17 '44 


88m 


Mar. 25, '44 


1814 


1616 


1847 


Laulcs OT VY asm n o,Ton 


20th-Fo* 

iVl 1 l"l UA 


430 


Ronald Graham-Trudy Marshall 


June, 44 


61m 


May 20, '44 


1898 


1849 




1 a n u Ira MnncTor Tho 

Lau y ano iiio i vi y 1 1 s i c i | i ne 


Rep. 


315 


vera FxaTSTon-ixicnara fwi&n 


Apr. 17, '44 


86m 


Mar. 18/44 


1801 




1947 


1 a n u in TnA D j rr 1 rol at 1 

L.o uy in ino uari. jwuiui i 


Para. 


4336 


Ginger Rogers-Ray rViilland 


Special 


100m 


Feb. 12, '44 


1753 


1091 


1947 


Lady in the Death House 


PRC 


414 


Lionel Atwill~Jean Parker 


Mar 1 <\ '44 
ivi ar. 1 9, Tt 


58m 


Mar. 25, '44 


1814 


1746 




Lady, Let's Dance 


Mono. 




R a 1 1 + a _ irnst rllienn 

Doiiia*james ci jison 


Anr IS '44 


88m 


Jan. 29,'44 


1735 


1599 




Lady Takes a Chance, A 


RKO 


405 


loan Art nil r- Innn W *uno 


Block 1 


86m 


Aug. 21, '43 


1547 


1240 


1655 


Land Beyond the Law (Reissue) WB 


336 


lsiok ror on 


Oct. 2, '43 


55m 










Laramie Trail, The 


Rep. 


355 


R j*\ 1 lumnttnn.VmnAU RupiiATfa 

Duu i-i v i n y iron" jm 1 1 ey Durnene 


Apr. 3, '44 


55m 


Mar. 25, '44 


1814 


1786 




Larceny with Music 


Univ. 


8028 


Allan JftnAc-KIfk/ Cai-UcIa 
Allan -J ones- ixiTTy wanisi© 


C..i 10 '41 

JO pi. 1 V, ~ J 


64m 


Sent II '43 


1530 


1351 




Lassie Come Home (color) 


MGM 


410 


R /"\ r*l i*i \/ l\A i~ D a 1 1 _ r~rA m 1 1 n rA t—twann 

ixuuuy ivi tL/uwaiiLUiiiunu vwun n 


Dec. '43 


90m 


Aug. 21, '43 


1546 


1240 


1766 


Last Horseman, The 


Col. 


5208 


Kiiccafl Mav//ian.Diik TaumP 

ixUsao 1 1 i i ayuon°uuD layior 


lima 77 '44 
Juno ^fc, 1 ' 




July l,'44 


1969 


1890 




Last Ride, The 


WB 




R icharn TfAvi^-FlAAnrtr rArror 


| 944-45 








1 1 15 




Laura 


20th-Fox 




C—f ana Tiprn pv. M A n A MflnrOWC 

vciis i lei ney-L/«3iia nnorews 


1944.45 








1899 




Law Men 


Mono. 




nknn\/ K_n^^v Rpau/m 

uonnny iviacs Drown 


Mau A '44 
ivi ay 0, Tt 


55m 


July 1 ,'44 


1970 


1817 




Leave It to the Irish 


Mono. 




1 a m o C Ijiinn _\A/ = n <•! a r K a \j 


Ana fi '44 
r\ u y • o, 11 








1923 




Let's Face It 


Para. 


4301 


Rr»h Honp-Rfi+tv HnHnn 


Block 1 


76m 


Aug. 7,'43 


1559 


1277 


1766 


Lifeboat 


20th-Fox 


419 


Ta II ill R It no a rl -\A/i II i a m Ranrliy 
1 a II U 1 a n DariKneau-VT 1 1 1 1 a m Den O IX 


Ian 28 '44 
>fan. AO, i t 


96m 


Jan. I5,'44 


1713 


1616 


1902 


Life and Death of Colonel Blimp 


















(British) Archers-Gen'l 




A \A/ IL LB 1 • 

Anton W a I brook-Koger Li vesey 


Klnt ^at 


1 63m 


July I0,'43 


1413 






Lodger, The 


20th-Fox 


417 


1 a irn Iponap.Mopla nkornn 

i_aira vrogar*iviyritf vuaron 


Jan. 7 '44 


84m 


Jan. 8,'44 


1705 


1636 


1902 


Lost Angel 


MGM 


415 


Margaret O'Brien-James Craig 


Jan./44 


91m 


Nov. 6,'43 


1613 


1555 


1902 


Lost in a Harem 


MGM 




Bud A hbott-Lou Costello 


Not Sat 








1850 




Louisiana Hayride 


Col. 




Judy Canova-Richard Lane 


July 13/44 








1890 




Lumber Jack 


UA 




William Boyd-Andy Clyde 


Apr. 28,'44 


63m 


Apr. 8,'44 


1834 


1763 




MACHINE Gun Mama 


PRC 


421 


A r m i i"J ;a .. I~ 1 Rronnal 
riiliud tl yi cllucl 


Aug. 2, '44 








1889 




(formerly Mexican Fiesta) 


















Madame Curie 


MGM 


490 


Craar ftartrtPi \A/a fap PinnAnn 

oreer var5on*TTdiTBr riayeon 


Feb. '44 


124m 


Nov. 20,'43 


1633 


1416 


1847 


Mad Ghoul, The 


Univ. 


8038 


Eua nn ankapt.riauifl Rpii/^a 

cveiyn AvriKera-L/aviQ Druce 


Klnv 1? '41 




Oct. 23, '43 


1594 


1586 




Maisie Goes to Reno 


MGM 




unn \rtthftpn. Innn H i* - * fi i ;a If 
r\ nn juincrn juiiii i iuuiok 


Not Set 








1971 




Make Your Own Bed 


WB 


317 


■ A/*r t ap(i*in. nni WuhTtan 


lima 10 '44 
junB 1 V, Tt 


82m 


May 20,'44 


1898 


1715 




Man from Down Under, The 


MGM 


41 1 


Charles Laughton-Binnie Barnes 


no/- '4? 


103m 


Aug. 7,'43 


1547 






Man from 'Frisco 


Rep. 


318 


\\A t f n a a 1 (J SnPA-AnnA Cn i rl a\/ 


July I ,'44 


91m 


Apr. 29,'44 


1866 


1835 




Man from the Rio Grande, The Rep. 


363 


Dnn R.» rr\/_TwI n Ha \A/aUi 

uon Dairy™ i win ua vvotts 


O^t IR '43 


55m 


Oct. 2, '43 


1566 






Man in Half Moon Street, The Para. 




Nile An+riPr-HftUn WaILaf 
INU5 bTner-n eien vvaiRer 


1 044-4 ^ 








1747 




Manpower (Reissue) 


WB 


341 


i~ rA w a rri f— ■ R /"\ rsi ncr\n_ (-^ oArno k a tt 
tuwdi u \^ • r\o fj i iidUii'vcuru e i\a it 


lulu 1 S '44 
juiy 19, Tt 


103m 


July 5, '41 


1957 






Marine Raiders 


RKO 


427 


Pat ("YRriPnRn + h H mcpy 

r a t \-s urien-i\UTn i i u bbc y 


DtOCK O 


90 m 


June 24, '44 


1957 


1696 




Marked Trails 


Mono. 




H r\ rt"f C—t i t~i ?ri n - Vp ri a Ann R^rrt 
i ivvi v»-/ iujuii i cuo /\ iiii u \j i y 


Not Set 








1971 




Marriage Is a Private Affair 


MGM 




I ■ n m TiirnAr. 9 Ann H a/*i i a r 

Ld iia i urnui*j onn i i uuiaK 


KJnt <\ot 

MOT WOT 








1806 




Marshal of Gunsmoke 


Univ. 


8083 


Tot R i 4~fo r_ KiiccaII H aunon 

i ex i\i tto r- r\uaseii riflyoen 


Ian 71 '44 
J9n, a 1 , Tt 








1676 




Marshal of Reno 


Rep. 


3312 


Rill PlilnH-RrthKu RUIta 
dim Liiiui f uuuuy oiaKe 


July 2, '44 








1923 




Mask of Dimitrios, The 


WB 


318 


SunriflU Gr ap nstrPfi t-Ppf a r 1 nrrA 
«iyu iiuy vi cciijh coi i cioi uvno 


July 1 ,'44 


95m 


June 10, '44 


1934 


1746 




Meet Me in St. Louis (color 


1 MGM 




lunv HApUnn.MarnArot (j RriAn 
vuuy voi lanu iviai uai vi ui i<9ii 


Not ^at 

nor jbi 








1715 




Meet the People 


MGM 


426 


Dirk- Pnwpll-I urillp RaII 


May, '44 


100m 


Apr. 8, '44 


1834 


1456 


1902 


Melody Parade 


Mono. 




k>4 a ru Rotn 1— J 1 1 rinoc.p/iriiQ i) i ■ ■ 11 >n 

n/iary dhtii i tugnoj-tuaie \f/uiiian 


Ann 71 '43 


73 m 


Aua 7 '43 


1559 


1339 




Melody Trail (Reissue) 


Rep. 


3304 


I^AnA AllTPt/ 

vcn<} rtUTry 


lima 1 '44 
June 1 , tt 












Memphis Belle, The (color) Para.-WAC 


T3-I 


War NAAMrnonlapii 

vv ar L^owumenTary 


Anr 14 '44 
rtpr. 1 ^, Tt 


41m 


Mar 25 '44 

ivi a ■ * 4^1 1 1 


1813 






Men of the Sea (British) 


PRC 


420 


\A/ 1 frcri 1 au/tnn.Maru Iapp/sIpi 

vvurreo i-o woun ivi a r y Jcrruiu 


Anr 30 '44 

rtpr, jv, Tt 


50m 






1890 




Men on Her Mind 


PRC 


409 


Ivi A r\j Rnf n H iinnocrn warn N nrric 


Feb. 12 '44 


67m 


Feb. 5, '44 


1743 


1715 




Merry Monahans, The 


Univ. 




Dnnfl /i fj C.o nnnr.ronriu Puxn 
uunaiu von nor- r ey y y rvyon 


Klnt ^ot 

MOT J6T 








1786 




Million Dollar Kid, The 


Mono. 




East Side Kids 

Ludl WlUo IX IVJ J 


Foh ?fl '44 

rout £Q, 1 t 


65m 


Feb. 26, '44 


I774 


1676 




Minesweeper 


Para. 


4308 


n lAharn A rl a n - lAAfi Parrar 

iMcnoro r le n-u so n r a r xe r 


DIOCK X 




Nov. 6,'43 


1615 


1606 


1818 


Ministry of Fear 


Para. 




Kau i 1 a n ri - rvn ArirtriA Rpunn Lie 
i \ a y iviiiiaiiu iviai 1 i\cy iiuiuj 


| 944.45 








1616 




Minstrel Man 


PRC 


404 


nennv pialne.T^lanuc \~tar*\ma 

Denny n e i u i v iduyi y ^ e o rq e 


lulu 1 '44 
uuiy 1 , 


69m 


July I ,'44 


1970 






Miracle of Morgan's Creek, The Para. 


43 12 


tplrlia KraAtopi.Rafki HtiHftn 

luuio Diacxen-DeTTy nuTTon 


DI..L 4 
DIOCK 3 


98m 


Jan 8 '44 

wan* U| 11 


1705 


1079 


1947 


Mojave Firebrand 


Rep. 


377 


Rill Fllin+t-AAr-iku Mau^C 

Din cMiyiT - *ja ooy nayicis 


IVI or. 1 T ( tT 




Jan 29 '44 

wall* IL 7 | it 


1 734 






Monster Maker, The 


PRC 


419 


1 f a tpaI Maxn.Ral An nil Apnan 

tj* vaKui i n a t s n* r\a i p n rvioryan 


Anr IR'44 
npr, 1 0, *t*t 


65m 


Mar 1 1 '44 

ivi ai> 1 1 1 1 j 


1 794 






Moonlight and Cactus 


Univ. 




A n n r q \u e \itlapt-l € " Bi p 1 1 1 

nnorBws o i5Ter5= ue o vsarino 


Mrt* Cat 
IN OT 36" 








1746 




Moonlight in Vermont 


Univ. 


8025 


C—m Iapi a Ini n_PK\f MAlm 

Gloria JBan*ray neim 


Da- OA *A0 
wQC. Z*T, 


62m 


Doc 25 '43 


1686 


1635 




Moon Over Las Vegas 


Univ. 


8037 


Anne C^wynne-David Bruce 


Mpr. AO, *TT' 


69 m 


Aor 15 '44 


1845 


1785 




Mr. Muggs Steps Out 


Mono. 




Pact 9Irla t^irle 
CaST J'u9 Mas 


uec. 1 u, *tj 


63 m 


Dee 25 '43 


1686 


1555 




Mr. Skeffington 


WB 


319 


RaWa IJ tuic _fll anna Pamc 
O 6 TT© WAV li'vld UQo l\a 1 il b 


Kli-iT Cat 


146m 


May 27,'44 


1909 


1654 




Mr. Winkle Goes to War 


Col. 




E. G. Ro bi nson-Robe rt Armstrong 


Aim 0 '44 
Mug* J, 'tt 1 








1817 




Mrs. Partington 


MGM 




Greer (Sarson-N»Valter Pidgeon 


Mat C*a+ 
INOT J6T 








1 835 




Mummy's Ghost, The 


Univ. 


.... 


John Ca rra di n e-Lon Chaney 


Ink/ 7 "Aal 
July / , *r*r 


61m 


May I3/4 - * 


1886 


1763 




Murder in the Blue Room 


Univ. 




Anne f— ■ u/un ncliA n a \n \ 

/An n e wynnc uunaiu v-*o o x 


KlriT Cat 








1971 




Murder on the Waterfront 


WB 


302 


Irtnn 1 nHAr-RtiTn Pnrn 


C An i to '4^ 


49 m 


July 3 1 ,'43 


I579 






Music in Manhattan 


RKO 




Anno Snir ov/.Don mc [jau 

nnnc jriii iey-L/enni9 uay 


INOT JcT 






1958 




My Best Gal 


Rep. 


312 


Jane Withers-Jimmy Lydon 


Mar. 28.'44 


67m 


Mar. I8,'44 


1802 


1696 




My Reputation 


WB 




Barbara Stanwyck-George Brent 


1944-45 








1695 




Mystery Broadcast 


Rep. 


304 


Nils Asther-Ruth Terry 


Nov. 23,'43 


63 m 


Oct. 23,'43 


1595 


1586 




Mystery Man 


UA 




William Boyd-Andy Clyde 


May 31, "44 


58m 


July l,'44 


1969 







MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



1977 



REVIEWED 



M.P. 



Product Advance Servici ] 







Prod. 




Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synopsit 


DaU 


Title 


Company 


Number 


Stan 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Pag* 


Page 


NABONSA 




408 


Buster Crabbe-rm Dorsey 


1 OK *AA 

Jan. Zo, 44 


/Jm 


U , r A 1 AA 

Mar. 4, 44 


1 701 

1 foS 


1 

8 054 


I CM 


National Barn Dance 


n 

rara. 




Jean Heather-James Brown 


1 OA A A C 
1 744-40 








1 940 
1 o4t 




National Velvet (color) 


MOM 




Mickey Rooney-Jackie Jenkins 


Not oet 








1 /03 




Navy Way, The 


Para. 


4316 


Robert Lowery-Jean Parker 


ni 1 A 

Block 4 


/4m 


reb* zo, 44 


1 77A 
1 / /4 


1 III 


i on? 


Never a Dull Moment 


Univ. 


OU3U 


Ritz Bros. -Frances Langford 


kl | ft 'A? 

Nov. 1 V, 43 


oum 


INOV. O, *t3 


1 AIR 
10 8 0 


I 1 

1001 




INignt ot Adventure, A 


T>vr\ 


4Z8 


T — 1. - D 1 

lorn Oonway-Jean Brooks 


block O 


/ r 

oom 


June o, 


1 O? 1 


1 ODU 




Nine Girls 


Ool. 


eft 1 A 

bUlo 


A 1 1 _ J • el V 

Ann Harding-Evelyn Keyes 


Feb. 17/44 


/am 


ki 1 Q >AA 

Mar. I o, 44 




1 AJ7A 
1 O/O 


i on? 


No Greater Love (Russian) 


Artlcino 




Russian feature 


Mar. 3 t '44 


7 1 m 

/ 1 m 


mar. % *t*r 


1 7ft? 




i on? 


None But the Lonely Heart 


RKO 




Cary Grant-Ethel Barrymore 


Not oe? 








1826 




None Shall Escape 


Col. 


5006 


Marsha Hunt-Alexander Knox 


Feb. 3,'44 


85m 


Jan. 15/44 


1713 


1695 


1847 


Northern Pursuit 


WB 


307 


Errol Flynn-Julie Bishop 


Nov. 13/43 


94m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 


1471 


1847 


North Star, The RKO-Goldwyn 


451 


Walter Huston-Anne Baxter 


Special 


105m 


Oct. 16/43 


1585 


1305 


1766 


Norway Replies 


Hoffberg 




Documentary on Norway 


Feb. 25/44 


61m 


Mar. 4/44 


1782 






No Time for Love 


Para. 


4309 


Claudette Colbert-Fred MacMurray 


Block 2 


83m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


855 


1818 



OH, SUSANNA (Reissue) 


Rep. 


3303 


Gene Autry 


Apr. I5,'44 


59m 








Oh, What a Night 


Mono. 




Edmund Lowe-Marjorie Rambeau 


Aug. I2,"44 








1923 


Oklahoma Kid (Reissue) 


WB 


330 


James Cagney-Humphrey Bogart 


Sept. 1 1/43 


80m 


Mar. 18/39 


1482 




Oklahoma Raiders 


Univ. 


8084 


Tex Ritter-Fuzzy Knight 


Mar. I7,'44 








i 785 


Old Acquaintance 


WB 


308 


Bette Devis-Miriam Hopkins 


Nov. 27,'43 


1 10m 


Nov. 6/43 


1613 


1192 


O My Darling Clementine 


Rep. 


308 


Frank Albertson-Lorna Grey 


Dec. 31, "43 


68m 


Dec. 4/43 


1653 


1636 


On Approval (British) Box-Brook. 




Clive Brook-Beatrice Lillie 


Not Set 


80m 


May 27/44 
Apr. 29/44 


1910 




Once Upon a Time 


Col. 


5004 


Cary Grant-Janet Blair 


May 1 1 .44 


89m 


1867 


1616 


One Body Too Many 


Para. 




Jack Haley-Jean Parker 


1944-45 








1850 


One Inch from Victory 


Scoop 




Documentary on Russia 


Apr. 25,'44 


67m 


May 6/44 


1878 




Our Hearts Were Young and Gay 


Para. 




Diana Lynn-Gail Russell 


1944-45 








1746 


Outlaw Roundup 


PRC 


454 


Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 


Feb. 10/44 


55m 






1715 


Outlaw Trail, The 


Mono. 




Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele 


Apr. 29,"44 


55m 


Apr. 1/44 


1826 


1786 


Outlaws of Sante Fe 


Rep. 


366 


Don Barry-Wally Vernon 


Apr. 4,'44 


54m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 




Overland Mail Robbery 


Rep. 


376 


Bill Elliot+-Anne Jeffreys 


Nov. 20/43 


55m 


Oct. 23/43 


1594 





PARDON My Rhythm Univ. 

Paris After Dark 20th-Fox 

Partners of the Trail Mono. 

Passage to Marseille WB 

Passport to Destiny RKO 

(formerly Passport to Adventure) 

Patrick the Great Univ. 

People's Avengers (Russian) Artkino 

Phantom Lady Univ. 

Picture of Dorian Gray, The MGM 

Pinto Bandit PRC 

Pin Up Girl (color) 20th-Fox 

Pistol Packin' Mama Rep. 

Polo Joe (Reissue) WB 

Port of 40 Thieves Rep. 

Practically Yours Para. 

Prame Thunder (Reissue) WB 

Pride of the Plains Rep. 
Princess and the Pirate, The 

(color) RKO-Goldwyn 

Princess O'Rourke WB 
Purple Heart, The 

QUEEN and the Ca 
(Fr.) 



RACKET Man, The 
Raiders of the Border 
Raiders of Sunset Pass 
Rainbow Island (color) 
Rains Came, The (Reissue) 
Range Law 
Rationing 

Resurrection (Mexican) 
Return of the Ape Man 
Return of the Rangers 
Return of the Vampire 
Rhapsody in Blue 
Riders of the Deadline 
Riding High (color) 
Riding West 
Road to Utopia 
Roger Touhy, Gangster 
Rookies in Burma 
Rootin', Tootin' Rhythm (Re 
Rosie the Riveter 
Rustler's Hideout 



8032 Gloria Jean-Patric Knowles May 19/44 

409 George Sanders-Brenda Marshall Oct. 15/43 

.... Johnny Mack Brown-Raymond Hatton Apr. 1/44 

312 Humphrey Bogart-Michele Morgan Mar. 11/44 

417 Elsa Lanchester-Gordon Oliver Block 4 

.... Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan Not Set 

.... War Documentary June 15/44 

8014 Ella Raines-Franchot Tone Jan. 28/44 

.... George Sanders-Angela Lansbury Not Set 

456 Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill Apr. 27/44 

427 Betty Grable-Joe E. Brown May/44 

310 Ruth Terry-Bob Livingston Dec. 15/43 

346 Joe E. Brown July 15/44 

324 Stephanie Bachelor-Richard Powers Aug. 13/44 

.... Claudette Colbert-Fred MacMurray 1944-45 

332 Dick Foran Oct. 2 '43 

353 Robert Livingston-Smiley Burnette Jan. 5/44 

.... Bob Hope-Virginia Mayo Not Set 

305 Olivia de Havilland-Robert Cummings Oct. 23/43 



61m 
85m 
54m 
109m 
64m 



56m 
87m 

56m 
83m 
64m 
65m 
58m 

55m 
56m 



May 6/44 
Oct. 9/43 
Mar. 4/44 
Feb. 19/44 
Jan. 29/44 



June 24/44 
Jan. 29/44 

June 17/44 
Apr. 22/44 
Dec. 11/43 
Sept. 26/36 
June 24/44 



Dec. 4/43 



94m Sept. 25/43 



1878 
1573 
1782 
1761 
1734 



1958 
1733 

1946 
1857 
1666 
1957 
1958 



1653 



1553 



1785 
1545 
1747 
1616 
1636 

1675 

1675 
1899 
1826 
1531 
1654 



1806 



1889 
962 



20th-Fox 


422 


Dana Andrews-Richard Conte 


Mar.,'44 


99m 


Feb. 26/44 


1773 


1654 


1, The 
















French 




Georges Milton-Robert Le Vigan 


May 31/44 


91m 


June 10/44 


1935 




Col. 


5036 


Tom Neal-Jeanne Bates 


Jan. 18/44 


64m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1676 


Mono. 


Johnny Mack Brown 


Jan. 31/44 


53m 


Jan. 15/44 


1714 




Rep. 


352 


Eddie Dew-Smiley Burnette 


Dec. 20/43 


56m 


Dec. 25/43 


1686 


i-457 


Para. 


Dorothy Lamour-Eddie Bracken 


1944-45 








1654 


20th- Fox 


410 


Myrna Loy-Tyrone Power 


Nov. 26/43 


95m 


Sept. 9/39 


1574 




Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


July 1/44 


57m 


May 13/44 


1886 




MGM 


418 


Wallace Beery-Marjorie Main 


Mar.,'44 


93m 


Jan. 29/44 


1734 


1616 


Clasa 




Lupita Tovar-Emilio Tuero 


Apr. 10/44 


88m 


Apr. 29/44 


1867 




Mono. 




Bela Lugosi-John Carradine 


June 17/44 








1606 


PRC 


451 


Dave O'Brein-Jim Newill 


Oct. 26/43 


60m 


Oct. 16/43 


1585 


1545 


Col 


5024 


Bela Lugosi-Frieda Inescourt 


Nov. 11/43 


69m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 


1599 


WB 




Joan Leslie-Robert Alda 


1944-45 








1530 


UA 




William Bovd 


' Dec. 3/43 


70m 


Jan. 15/44 


1714 


1696 


Para. 


4307 


Dorothy Lamour-Dick Powell 


Block 2 


88m 


Nov. 6/43 


1613 


1431 


Col. 


5207 


Charles Starrett-Shirley Patterson 


May 18/44 








1835 


Para. 




Bing Crosby-Bob Hope-D. Lamour 


1944-45 








1715 


20th-Fox 


43! 


Preston Foster-Lois Andrews 


July/44 


65m 


May 27/44 


1910 


1362 


RKO 


414 


Alan Carney-Wally Brown 


Block 3 


62 m 


Dec. 1 1/43 


1666 


1646 


tissue) Rep. 


3301 


Gene Autry 


Jan. 15/44 


61m 








Rep. 


313 


Jane Frazee-Frank Albertson 


Apr. 9/44 


75m 


Mar. 25/44 


1814 


1785 


PRC 


465 


Buster Crabbe-Al St. John 


July 25/44 








1971 



1902 
1902 



1947 



1902 



1947 
1818 



1655 
1947 



1902 



184; 



SAHARA Col. 

Saint Meets the Tiger, The Rep. 
Saint That Forged a Country, The 

(Mex.) Clasa-Mohme 
Sailor's Holiday Col. 
Salute to the Marines (color) MGM 
San Demetrio, London (British) Ealing 
San Fernando Valley Rep. 

1978 



5003 


Humphrey Bogart-Bruce Bennett 


Oct. 14/43 


97m 


Oct. 2/43 


1565 


1305 


301 


Hugh Sinclair-Jean Gillis 


July 29/43 


70m 


Aug. 7/43 


1471 






Ramon Novarro-Gloria Marin 


May 25/44 


106m 


June 10/44 


1935 




5038 


Arthur Lake-Jane Lawrence 


Feb. 24/44 


61m 


Apr. 15/44 


1845 


1696 


401 


Wallace Beery-Fay Bainter 


• Seo+..'43 


101m 


July 31/43 


1579 


1057 




Walter Fitzgerald-Ralph Michael 


Not Set 


105m 


Jan. 29/44 


1734 






Roy Rogers-Dale Evans 


Not Set 








i97l 



171 



16: 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1 1* «1 



REVIEWED 



Prod. 

Title Company 'Number 

n Frarvcisco de Asis (Mex.) Azteca .... 

ratoga Trunk WB .... 

;arlet Claw, The Univ. 8019 

icret Command Col. .... 

•crets In the Dark MGM .... 

ecrets of Scotland Yard Rep. 321 

se Here, Private Hargrove MGM 420 

»e My Lawyer Univ 

ensations of 1945 UA-Stone .... 

sven Days Ashore RKO 424 

5 ven Doors to Death PRC 417 

aventh Cross, The MGM .... 

.venth Victim, The RKO 403 

ladows in the Night Col. .... 

(formerly Crime Doctor's Rendezvous) 

lake Hands with Murder PRC 
terlock Holmes Faces Death Univ. 

he's a Soldier, Too Col. 

ne's for Me Univ. 

nine On, Harvest Moon WB 
nipbuilders, The (British) Nat'l-Anglo 

tow Business RKO 

irine of Victory (British) 20th-Fox 

. lent Bell. The RKO 

lent Partner Rep. 

Iver City Kid (1944-45) Rep. 

Iver City Raiders Col. 

nee You Went Away UA 

ng a Jingle Univ. 

ightly Terrific Univ. 
tow White and the 

Seven Dwarfs (color) RKO-Disney 

a This Is Washington RKO 

an of Dracula Univ. 

sng of Bernadette, The 20th-Fox 

ang of Nevada Rep. 

■ 3ng of Russia MSM 

Dng of the Open Road UA 

ang of the Saddle (Reissue) WB 

ong to Remember, A Col. 

(formerly At Night We Dream) 

. snora Stagecoach Mono, 

outh of Dixie Univ. 

a's Your Uncle Univ. 

pider Woman Univ. 

pook Town PRC 

potlight Scandals Mono, 

tanding Room Only Para, 

tars on Parade Col. 

tep Lively RKO 

form Over Lisbon Rep. 

tory of Dr. Wassell (color) Para, 
(range Death of Adolf Hitler Univ. 

.ubmarine Base PRC 

.'ullivans, The 20th-Fox 

ultan'i Daughter, The Mono, 

ummer Storm UA 

undown Valley Col. 

weet and Lowdown 20th-Fox 

weet Rosie O'Srady (color) 20th-Fox 



weethearts of the U. 
wing Fever 
wing Out the Blues 
wing Shift Maisie 
wingtime Johnny 



S. A. 



Mono. 
MGM 
Col. 
MGM 
Univ. 



422 
8024 
5040 
8041 

313 

425 
426 

317 
461 
5202 

8034 
8036 

492 
404 
8013 

344 
422 

33 1 



8042 
8021 
457 

4314 

5023 
429 

4337 
8022 
405 
421 



5205 
408 

423 
5020 

404 
8020 



Start 

Jose Luis Jimenez 
Gary Cooper-lngrid Bergman 
Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce 
Pat O'Brien-Carole Landis 
Susan Peters-Robert Young 
Edgar Barrier-Stephanie Bachelor 
Robert Walker-Donna Reed 
Olsen and Johnson-Grace McDonald 
Dennis O'Keefe-Eleanor Powell 
Wally Brown-Gordon Oliver 
Chick Chandler-June Clyde 
Spencer Tracy-Signe Hasso 
Tom Conway-Kim Hunter 
Warner Baxter-Nina Foch 

Iris Adrian-Frank Jenks Apr. 22, '44 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce Sept. 17/43 

Beulah Bondi-Nina Foch June 29/44 

David Bruce-Grace McDonald Dec. 10/43 

Ann Sheridan-Dennis Morgan Apr. 8/44 

Clive Brook-Morland Graham Not Set 

Eddie Cantor-George Murphy Block 5 

Documentary on Greece Apr.,'44 

Simone Simon-Kurt Kreuger Not Set 

Beverly Loyd-William Henry June 9/44 

Allan Lane July 20/44 

Russell Hayden-Bob Wills Nov. 4/43 

Colbert-Temple-Woolley-Cotten Not Set 

Allan Jones-June Vincent Jan. 7/44 

Leon Errol -Anne Rooney May 5/44 

Disney Cartoon Feature Reissue 

Lum 'n' Abner-Mildred Coles Block I 

Louise Allbritton-Lon Chaney Nov. 5/43 

Jennifer Jones-Charles Bickford Special 

Roy Rogers-Mary Lee-Dale Evans Aug. 5/44 

Robert Taylor-Susan Peters Feb.,'44 
Edgar Bergen-"Charrie"-Bonita Granville June 2/44 

Dick Foran Oct. 2/43 

Merle Oberon-Paul Muni Not Set 

Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele June 10/44 

Anne GwynnerDavid Bruce June 23/44 

Donald Woods-Elyse Knox Dec. 3/43 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce Jan. 21/44 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill June 3/44 

Billy Gilbert-Frank Fay Sept. 24/43 

Paulette Goddard-Fred MacMurray Block 3 

Lynn Merrick-Larry Parks May 25/44 

Frank Sinatra-George Murphy Block 6 
Vera Hruba Ralston-Erich von Stroheim Not Set 

Gary Cooper-Laraine Day Special 

Ludwig Donath-Gale Sondergaard Sept. 10/43 

John Litel-Alan Baxter July 20/43 

Anne Baxter-Thomas Mitchell Feb. ,'44 

Ann Corio-Charles Butterworth Jan. 24/44 

George Sanders-Linda Darnell July 14/44 

Charles Starrett-Jeanrte Bates Mar. 23/44 

Lynn Bari-Benny Goodman 1944-45 

Betty Grable-Robert Young Oct. 1/43 

Una Merkel-Donald Novis Mar. 18/44 

Kay Kyser-Marilyn Maxwell Apr.,'44 

Bob Haymes-Lynn Merrick Jan. 20/44 

Ann Sothern-James Craig Oct.,'43 

Andrews Sisters-Harriet Hilliard Feb. 4/44 







M.P. 


Product 


Advance 


Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synopsis 


Date 


Thne 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Not Set 


125m 


Apr. 1/44 


1826 




1 944-45 








1431 


May 26/44 


74 m 


Apr. 29/44 


1867 


1850 


July 20/44 


80m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1786 


Not Set 








1850 


July 26/44 


68m 


June 17/44 


1945 


1937 


Mar.,'44 


100m 


Feb. 19/44 


1761 


1616 


Not Set 








1899 


June 30/44 


85m 


June 24/44 


1957 


1746 


Block 5 


74m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1817 


July 25/44 








1923 


Not Set 








1715 


Block 1 


71m 


Aug. 21/43 


1558 


1471 


July 27/44 






1899 



Data 
Page 



61m 
64m 
63 m 
59m 
73m 
82m 
63m 
88m 

136 m 
72m 
66m 

I Mm 
64m 

106m 
55m 

76 m 
63m 
81m 
70m 
86m 
60m 



May 27/44 
Dec. 4/43 
Jan. 15/44 

July 24/43 
Jan. 8/44 



Apr. 22/44 
Sept. 4/43 
July 10/43 
Feb. 5/44 
Dec. 18/43 
May 20/44 
Apr. 8/44 

Sept. 25/43 
Mar. 18/44 
Nov. 13/43 
Jan. 22/44 
May 8/43 
Jan. 1/44 



191 1 
1654 
1714 

io79 
1706 



June 24/44 1957 



1857 
1522 
1414 
1741 
1674 
1897 
1834 

1553 
1802 
1626 
1726 
1546 
1695 



1715 

1890 
1889 
1635 
1675 
1890 
1351 
1616 
1890 
1785 
1850 
1530 

1305 
1636 
1555 
1747 
1763 
1786 
1305 
1586 
1241 
1636 
1191 
1676 



1947 



63m 


May 6/44 


1 878 


1 835 




oo m 


sept. 1 1 , 4J 


1 coo 

1 bit 






67m 






i son 




60m 


Dec. 1 1/43 


1665 


1635 




1 12m 


Mar. 1 1/44 


1794 


1457 


1947 


90m 


Jan. 29/44 


1733 






92m 


Apr. 22/44 


1857 


1675 


1947 


45m 


Aug. 21/43 


1495 












1958 










1835 




55m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 












1635 




62m 


Jan. 1/44 


1694* 


1654 




62m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1785 




83m 


Dec.25'37 


1782 






64m 


Aug. 2 1/43 


1558 


1471 




80m 


Nov. 13/43 


1626 


1241 


1818 


157m 


Dec. 25/43 


1685 


1416 


1947 


75m 


June 17/44 


1945 


1890 




107m 


Jan. 1/44 


1693 


1416 


1902 


93m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1695 


1947 


59m 


Apr. 1 1/36 


1482 







1902 



1902 



1719 



1617 



AKE It Big Para. 4327 

ake It or Leave It 20th-Fox 

All in the Saddle RKO 

attipico 20th-Fox 425 

arzan's Desert Mystery RKO 413 

awny Pipit (Br'rfish) Two Cities-GFD 

axi to Heaven(Russian) Artkino .... 

tender Comrade RKO 416 

'exas Kid, The Mono 

exas Masquerade UA .... 

hank Your Lucky Stars WB 303 

hat Nazty Nuisance UA .... 

here's Something About a Soldier Col. 5017 

hey Live in Fear Col. 5043 

hey Made Me a Criminal (R.) WB 342 

hey Met in Moscow (Rus.) Artkino .... 

flirty Seconds Over Tokyo MGM .... 

his Happy Breed (Brit.) Two Cities .... 

his Is the Army (color) WB 224 

his Is the Life Univ. 8012 

icusands Cheer (color) MGM 413 

hree Little Sisters Rep. .... 

nree Men in White MGM 427 

hree of a Kind Mono. .... 

iree Russian Girls UA .... 

lundering Gun Slingers PRC 463 



Jack Haley-Harriet Hilliard Block 6 

Phil Baker-Marjorie Massow 1944-45 

John Wayne-Ella Raines Not Set 

Lynn Bari-Edward G. Robinson Apr.,'44 

Johnny Weissmuller-Nancy Kelly Block 3 

Bernard Miles-Rosamund John Not Set 

Musical Feature May 24/44 

Ginger Rogers-Robert Ryan Block 4 

Johnny Mack Brown Nov. 26/43 

William Boyd Feb. 18/44 

Warner Stars Revue Sept. 25/43 

Bobby Watson-Joe Devlin Aug. 6/43 

Evelyn Keyes-Tom Neal Nov. 30/43 

Otto Kruger-CHfford Severn June 15/44 

John Garfield-Ann Sheridan July 15/44 

Musical feature June 6/44 

Van Johnson-Robert Walker Not Set 

Robert Newton-Celia Johnson Not Set 
Joan Leslie-George Murphy-Stage Cast Feb. 15/44 

Susanna Foster-Donald O'Connor June 2/44 

Kathryn Grayson-Gene Kelly Jan./44 

Mary Lee-Ruth Terry-Cheryl Walker Not Set 

Lionel Barrymore-Van Johnson June/44 

Billy Gilbert-June Lang July 22/44 

Anna Sten-Kent Smith Jan. 14/44 

Buster Crabbe-AI St. John Mar. 25/44 



76m June 10/44 



1934 



1786 
1890 
1899 



75m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1636 


1947 


70m 


Dec. 11/43 


1666 


1362 


1847 


85m 


June 3/44 


1921 






70m 


June 3/44 


1922 






101m 


Jan. 1/44 


1693 


1635 


1902 


57m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1545 




59m 


Jan. 29/44 


1733 






127m 


Aug. 21/43 


1559 


1058 


1719 


42m 


June 12/43 


1546 


1019 




80m 


Dec. 18/43 


1674 


1545 




65m 






1889 




92m 


Jan. 7/39 


1957 






80m 


June 10/44 


1933 


1889 




115m 


May 27/44 


1909 






1 15m 


July 3 i .'43 


1453 


1276 


1575 


87m 


May 6/44 


1878 


1416 


1947 


126m 


Sept. 18/43 


1541 


1079 
1971 


1766 


«5m 


May 6/44 


1878 


1786 
1958 




80m 


Jan. 1/44 


1694 


1457 


1947 


60m 






1786 





)TION PICTURE HERALD, JULY I, 1944 



1979 



REVIEWED -n 















M. P. 


Product 


Advance 


Service 


1 ttle 


Cow putty 






Release 


Running 


Lieraia 


Digest 


Synopsis 


Date 






PvnA 


Stars 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


rage 


rage 


Page 


Tiger Fangs 


PRC 


406 


Frank Buck-Duncan Renaldo 


Sept. 10/43 


59m 


Sept. 25/43 


1554 


1531 




Tiger Shark (Reissue) 


WB 


345 


Edward G. Robinson-Richard Arlen 


July I5,'44 


79m 


Aug. 27/32 


1957 






Till We Meet Again 


Para. 




Ray Milland-Maureen O'Hara 


1944-45 








1676 




Timber Queen 


Para. 


4313 


Dick Arlen-Mary Beth Hughes 


Block 3 


65m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1696 




Time Flies (British) 


Gains. 




Tommy Handley-Evelyn Dall 


Not Set 


88m 


Mar. 18/44 


1803 






To Have and Have Not 


WB 




Humphrey Bogart-Dolores Moran 


1944-45 








1850 




Top Man 


Univ. 


8009 


Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan 


Sept. I7,'43 


82 m 


Sept. 18/43 


1541 


1456 




Tornado 


Para. 


4304 


Chester Morris-Nancy Kelly 


Block 1 


80m 


Aug. 14/43 


1579 


1457 




Trail to Gunsight 


Univ. 


8087 


Eddie Dew-Maris Wrixon 


Aug. I8,'44 








1971 




Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A 


20th-Fox 




Dorothy McGuire-Joan Blondell 


1944-45 








1923 




Trigger Law 


Mono. 




Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele 


July 29,'44 








1971 




Trigger Trail 


Univ. 


8086 


Rod Cameron-Fuzzy Knight 


July 7,'44 








1923 




Trocadero 


Rep. 


314 


Rosemary Lane-Johnny Downs 


Apr. 24.'44 


74m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1806 




True to Life 


Para. 


4303 


Mary Martin-Franchot Tone 


Block 1 


93m 


Aug. 14/43 


1578 


1079 


1719 


Tucson Raiders 


Rep. 


3311 


Bill Elliott-Bobby Blake 


May 14/44 


55m 


May 20/44 


1898 


1890 




Tunisian Victory MGM-MOI 


466 


Documentary 


Apr. 28/44 


80m 


Mar. 1 1/44 


1794 




1947 


Twilight on the Prairie 


Univ. 




Eddie Quillan-Vivian Austin 


July 14/44 


62m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1899 




Two-Man Submarine 


Col. 


5039 


Tom Neal-Ann Savage 


Mar. 16/44 


62m 


May 13/44 


1887 


1746 




Two Girls and a Sailor 


MGM 


428 


Jimmy Durante-Van Johnson 


June/44 


124m 


Apr. 29/44 


1865 


1696 




Two Years Before the Mast 


Para. 




Alan Ladd-Brian Donlevy 


1944-45 






1923 




U-BOAT Prisoner 


Col. 




Bruce Bennett-Erik Rolf 


July 25/44 








1899 




Ukraine in Flames (Russian) 


Artkino 




Documentary 


Apr. 1/44 


56m 


Apr. 15/44 


1845 






Uncensored (British) 


20th-Fox 


418 


Eric Portman-Phyllis Calvert 


Jan. 21/44 


83m 


Aug. 1/42 


1714 






Uncertain Glory 


WB 


314 


Errol Flynn-Paul Lukas 


Apr. 22/44 


102m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1636 


1902 


Underground Guerrillas (British) Col. 


5041 


John Clement-Mary Morris 


May 18/44 


82m 




1890 




Under Two Flags (Reissue) 


20th-Fox 


411 


Ronald Colman-Claudette Colbert 


Nov. 26/43 


99m 


May 9/36 


1574 






Uninvited, The 


Para. 


4315 


Ray Milland-Ruth Hussey 


Block 3 


98m 


Jan. 8/44 


1705 


1416 


1947 


Unknown Guest 


Mono. 




Victor Jory-Pamela Blake 


Oct. 22/43 


64m 


Aug. 28/43 


1559 






Up in Arms (color) RKO-Goldwyn 


452 


Danny Kaye-Dinah Shore 


Special 


105m 


Feb. 12/44 


1753 


1457 


1947 


Up in Mabel's Room 


UA 




Marjorie Reynolds-Dennis O'Keefe 


Apr. 28/44 


76m 


Mar. 25/44 


1813 


1695 


1947 


VALLEY of Vengeance 


PRC 


464 


Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 


May 5/44 


56m 






1890 




Very Thought of You, The 


WB 




Dennis Morgan-Faye Emerson 


1944-45 








1850 




Victory Through 




















Air Power (color) 


UA-Disney 




Disney Aviation Feature 


Aug. 13/43 


65m 


July 10/43 


1532 


1375 


1617 


Vigilantes Ride, The 


Col. 


5204 


Russell Hayden-Shirley Patterson 


Feb. 3/44 


56m 


Feb. 12/44 


1754 


IC8I 




Virgin of Guadalupe (Mex.j 


Maya 




Jose Luis Jimenez 


May 14/43 


95m 


May 22/43 


1325 






Voice in the Wind 


UA 




Francis Lederer-Sigrid Gurie 


Apr. 21/44 


84m 


Mar. 4/44 


1782 




1847 


Voodoo Man, The 


Mono. 




Bela Lugosi-John Carradine 


Feb. 2 1/44 


62m 


Feb. 26/44 


1774 


1676 




WAC, a Wave, a Marine, 


A Mono. 




Elyse Knox-Sally Eilers 


Not Set 








1899 




Walking Dead, The (Reissue 


) WB 


344 


Boris Karloff 


July 15/44 


66m 


Mar. 7/36 


1957 






Watch on the Rhine 


WB 


301 


Bette Davis-Paul Lukas 


Sept. 4/43 


113m 


July 31/43 


1579 


986 


1719 


Waterfront 


PRC 


415 


J. Carroll Naish-John Carradine 


June 10/44 


66m 


May 13,44 


1887 


1850 




Way Ahead, The (British) 


Two Cities 




David Niven-Stanley Holloway 


Not Set 


1 15m 


June 17/44 


1945 






Weekend Pass 


Univ. 


8029 


Martha O'Driscoll-Noah Beery, Jr. 


Feb. 18/44 


63 m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 


1676 




Weird Woman 


Univ. 


8027 


Lon Chaney-Anne Gwynne 


Apr. 14/44 


64m 


Apr. 8/44 


1834 


1747 




Welcome, Mr. Washington 




















(British) Br. Nat'l-Anglo 




Barbara Mullen-Donald Stewart 


Not Set 


90m 


July 1/44 


1969 






West of the Rio Grande 


Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


Aug. 5/44 






1937 




Westward Bound 


Mono. 




Ken Maynard-Hoot Gibson 


Jan. 17/44 


59 m 


Jan. 15/44 


i 7 i-4 


1599 




What a Woman! 


Col. 


5005 


Rosalind Russell-Brian Aherne 


Dec. 28/43 


93 m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


1635 


1818 


Where Are Your Children? 


Mono. 




Jackie Cooper-Patricia Morison 


Jan. 17/44 


72m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1606 


1847 


Whispering Footsteps 


Rep. 


309 


John Hubbard-Rita Quigley 


Dec. 30/43 


55m 


Feb. 26/44 


1774 


1636 




Whistler, The 


Col. 


5032 


Richard Dix-Gloria Stuart 


Mar. 30/44 


59m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1785 




Whistling in Brooklyn 


MGM 


412 


Red Skelton-Ann Rutherford 


Dec/43 


87m 


Oct. 2/43 


1565 


1431 


1766 


White Cliffs of Dover. The 


MGM 




Irene Dunne-Roddy McDowall 


Special 


126m 


Mar. 11/44 


1793 


1586 




Wilson (color) 


20th-Fox 




Alexander Knox-Charles Coburn 


1944-45 








1676 




Wing and a Prayer 


20th-Fox 




Don Ameche-Dana Andrews 


1944-45 








1835 




Wintertime 


20th-Fox 


405 


Sonja Henie-Jack Oakie 


Sept. 17/43 


82m 


Sept. 11/43 


1529 


1431 


1655 


Woman in the Window, The PKO 




Edward G. Robinson-Joan Bennett 


1944-45 








1923 




Woman of the Town, The 


UA 




Albert Dekker-Claire Trevor 


Dec. 3 1/43 


88m 


Dec. 18/43 


1673 


1531 


1818 


Women in Bondage 


Mono. 




Gail Patrick-Nancy Kelly 


Jan. 10/44 


72m 


Nov. 20/43 


1634 


1554 


1818 


Women in War (Reissue) 


Rep. 


9002 


Elsie Janis-Wendy Barrie 


Jan. 25/44 


69m 


May 25/40 


1726 






Wyoming Hurricane 


Col. 


5206 


Russell Hayden-Bob Wills 


Apr. 20/44 


58m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1079 




YANKS Ahoy 


UA-Roach 




Joe Sawyer-William Tracy 


July 1/43 


58m 


Mar. 13/43 


1532 


1019 




Yellow Canary (British) Wilcox-RKO 


423 


Anna Neagle-Richard Greene 


Block 5 


84m 


Nov. 20/43 


1634 






Yellow Rose of Texas 


Rep. 


343 


Roy Rogers-D&l© Evans 


June 24/44 


69m 


May 20/44 


1898 


1890 




Young Ideas 


MGM 


408 


Mary Astor-Herbert Marshall 


Nov./43 


77m 


July 31/43 


1578 


1240 


1818 


You Can't Ration Love 


Para. 


4318 


Betty Jane Rhodes-Johnnie Johnston 


Block 4 


78 m 


Mar. 4/44 


1781 


1763 


1947 


You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith Univ. 


8033 


Allan Jones-Evelyn Ankers 


Oct. 22/43 


64m 


Oct. 9/43 


1573 


1531 




Youth Runs Wild 


RKO 


430 


Bonita Granville-Kent Smith 


Block 6 


67m 


June 24/44 


1958 


1786 




ZIEGFELD Follies (color) 


MGM 




MGM Contract Stars 


Not Set 








1913 





Feature Product, including Coming Attractions, listed Company by Company, in 
Order of Release on page I960. 



1980 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY I, 1944 



lerican Casualties Now 
25,382, Including D- 

rUNGTON, June 22 (AP) f shows a n overal l 
Scan battle casualties '~ _ 
225.; 





Sympathy won't help 
him! Bonds will help 



destroy his murderers! 



LET'S GO 
FOR THE 

KNOCK- 
OUT BLOW! 



Let's pull no punches now! Let's spare no feel- 
ings! Are you satisfied with results? Time is 
measured in lives! Only a few more days to do 
a superhuman job. But we can do it! Wake up 
the public! They've got money to spend! Hit 
hard with Bond Premieres, Children's Bond 
Shows, Rallies, Free Movie Days! You who sell 
bonds for America, victory is in your hands! 




FREE MOVIE 
DAY, JULY 6»" 

Let our industry unite on 
July 6th with a mighty 
push that will electrify the 
nation. On the day before, 
the radio and press will 
blast FREE MOVIE DAY 
to all America. Be in the 
fighting ranks! Over the 
top, patriotic showmen! 



Sbonsored by War Activities Committee of Motion Picture Industry, 1501 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



I 







ASK OUR SALESMEN ABOUT $ 
. NEO-ART SPECIAt DISPLAY 



Don't go 'round plowing big divots out of your \ 
theatre investment... Don't slice your profits \ 
. . . and don't use the wrong kind of Adver- 
tising clubs . . . Correct your Box Office stance 1 
. . . Get yourself a good caddie . . . one who \ 
goes 'round with all the smart players of this 
industry . . . and who always hands you the 



right clubs ... Then address that ball like a \ 
Showman . . . Tee off like a money-maker and \ 
sink that drive squarely in the middle of the 1 
BIG PROFITS cup . . . Remember this caddie is 
always at your service . . . National Screen Serv- 
ice . . . where showmanship hooks, tops and 
slices . . . are corrected with good Advertising. 



"BUY and BUY BONDS" 
for 

"BYE and BYE FUNDS " 
Fighting Fifth War Loan I 



nmwnmChtiem service 

merer we movsnrr 



MOTION PICTURE 





REVIEWS 

(In Product Digest) 

Marshal of Reno 
Delinquent Daughters 
Law of the Saddle 
Return of the Ape Man 



EXHIBITORS FIGHT TO 
STOP TREND TOWARD 
STIFF BUILDING CODES 



17% OF 1944 RELEASES 
RUN OVER 100 MINUTES; 
GAIN OF 40% OVER 1943 



op 



AD FILMS MAKE 25% 
INCREASE IN THEATRE 
SCREEN TIME IN YEAR 



VOL 156, NO. 2 



JULY 8, 1944 




%>4 



V 






(Just TWO in Leo's New Group No. 8, but what a Terrific Twosome! 



i /'to! % 





(He's betting a cool million 



(She loved him — until she 
saw beneath the mask!) 



(So do the police 
of five capitals!) 



(Even a master of international intrigue 
can be fooled — by Dimitrios!) 



/fe MOWS,' 



For every crime, a different face — but 
always the same youthful charm, the same ruthless cunning, the same Dimifrios! 



MINER BROS • once again give your audience the "feel" of "The Maltese Falcon" 
h Eric Ambler's internationally -famed mystery sensation — thrice -thrilling on the screen! 




NEY GREENSTREET • ZACHARY SCOTT • FAYE EMERSON • PETER LORRE - VICTOR FRANCEN 

JACK L. WARNER, Executive Producer Produced by HENRY BLANKE 

Directed by JEAN NEGULESCO-s creen Play by Frank Gruber • From a Novel by Eric Ambler 
ALL AMERICA WAITS FOR "*REE MOVIE DAY" JULY 6th! 




Your Complete Popular-Price Campaign Now at Exchange 




Operating under special roadshow policy for this engagement 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



COLVIN BROWN, Publisher 


MARTIN QUIGLEY 
President and Editor-in-Chief 


TERRY RAMSAYE, Editor 


Vol. 156, No. 2 


OP 


July 8, 1944 



Kind Words 



THIS week of the Fourth of July, greatest of our national 
commemorations, and with its militant tradition in- 
tensified by the state of war, it is pleasant to record 
that our industry of the motion picture is achieving 
recognition of its service beyond all precedent. 

Never before has the screen theatre been so conspicuously 
and closely identified with the consuming interests of a cause 
which is at once intimately the concern of each community 
and its people and of the whole nation, too. 

The First World War saw a beginning. The industry was as 
patriotic then and the Government as eager. But a quarter 
of a century has seen evolutions in scope, capacity and 
organizational efficiencies. Back then, "Four Minute Men" 
spoke from theatre stages and Liberty Bond sellers solicited 
the patrons. Today every exhibitor is a Bond salesman, an 
.organizer, and a promoter of drives, while his screen has 
become articulate with pictures that talk. 

HERE at hand is a letter to the editor, in evidence 
of the new status of the screen. It is from Helen C. 
Tingley, secretary of the Maryland State Board of 
Motion Picture Censors, in Baltimore. As she observes, "No 
one is in a better position to appreciate the possibilities of 
the motion picture than a motion picture censor. 

CJ "What challenges the imagination is to note how, under the 
impetus of war, the motion picture has developed in diverse 
fields, all of which touch intimately the life of the common man 
the world over. 

CJ "The motion picture theatre, too, has become significant to 
the life of each separate community by making vivid to that 
community its special and vital interests. A case in point is the 
current bond drive. 

CJ "As D-Day dawned in Maryland, her progressive and popu- 
lar Governor, Herbert R. O'Conor, stepped out on the screens 
of the motion picture theatres throughout the State in a 130- 
foot trailer picture, and urged his people to buy bonds and give 
blood, as well as to pray for their men 'offering on the altar of 
life all their hopes for future happiness and even their very lives' 
All through the invasion drive, the theatres have gladly cooper- 
ated with the Governor's program by continuing to run this 
picture. The result amply justified this policy. Maryland has, 
set a new record and is the second state to go over the top in the 
'Fighting Fifth' War Loan with 120 per cent of its quota." 

Also, while the screen has for a considerable period now 
enjoyed a generally friendly press, the newspapers are these 
days carrying many expressions both directly and indirectly 
contributory to goodwill. Interestingly enough, the other day 
at a newspaper convention one publisher remarked that it 
was time that the newspapers had something to say for their 
own good works. 

AN emphatic statement is presented by an editorial in 
the Chicago Her aid- American under the title, 
"Unique Contribution". It is to be remembered that 
this same paper has presented several notable approbations 



of the industry in the last few years. In its issue of June 21 
it said: 

CJ The motion picture industry's contribution to the Fifth 
War Loan campaign in Chicago differs in one extremely 
important respect from those of most of the businesses that 
are so generously joining in the drive. 

All are expending effort and time. 

All are assuming expense in the prosecution of the campaign. 
But the motion picture industry alone is giving up its cash 
receipts. 

The war bond premiere plan, stimulated by the Chicago 
Herald-American's premiere of "The Story of Dr. Wassell", 
has been adopted by the motion picture industry as one of 
its principal methods of selling bonds in this drive. 

CJ Thirty-nine Chicago area theatres will hold war bond 
premieres this month. At those premieres, buying a bond is 
the price of admission. No tickets are sold. 

So each theatre that gives a bond premiere sacrifices its 
entire receipts for that night. 

Also, when a film-distributing company provides the feature 
picture for a bond premiere without cost, the distributing 
company gives up its cash receipts. 

CJ Thus the film industry makes a heavy cash contribution 
to the bond drive in addition to labor and thought. 

And thus it demonstrates once more its unselfish devotion 
to the cause of winning the war. 

In that outgiving the Chicago Her aid- American says 
something for the industry which it would not be saying for 
itself, but there is no reason why any showman might not 
communicate the notion to other editors. A glimpse of this 
page might do it. 

Also from Chicago's Sunday Times of June 25 comes an 
attention in Herb Graffis' column which does a bit of explain- 
ing to the layman which is of value in contributing to the 
public opinion of the screen. Says Mr. Graffis: 

JJ Any criticism of the circus necessary to sell bonds over- 
looks the fundamental fact that special events such as these 
movie premieres have sold billions of dollars worth of bonds 
by jarring people loose through novel appeals or unique 
applications of high pressure. 

CJ You might think that with the national income this year 
being about twice what it was before the war, and the 
increased cost of living being somewhat offset by lack of some 
things to buy, that most of the surplus would go into bonds 
to help win the war. 

But we're not that wise. That's why horses don't bet on 
people. The horses would go broke sooner than people. 

CJ These picture house owners and the companies supplying 
the premiere pictures are passing up their incomes on good 
nights and paying out operating expenses. They'll bring in 
millions of dollars to help bring the boys home sooner. They 
have chosen their bond-selling premiere pictures from among 
the very best. I see that "A Guy Named Joe" and "Lady in 
the Dark" are two of the favored films. 

There you have a sample of opinion and press on the 
motion picture and its theatre in the cause of the War Loans. 
[Continued on following page, column 1] 



THIS WEEK IN THE NEWS 



Normal Again 



TO "show that things are back to normal," the 
motion picture theatre in Cherbourg, the first 
big port in France captured by the Allies, 
was reopened last week, after American officers 
conferred with the theatre manager. The Al- 
lied military control officers said last week they 
would see that all German films were thrown 
away. So reported James McGlincy, United 
Press correspondent with the invasion, in a 
resume of Cherbourg's return to normal. 



" Wilson 99 on the Air 

THE increased use of radio for advertising 
local engagements, a trend of the past year 
among film companies, was this week shown 
by Twentieth Century-Fox's placement of 800 
recorded "spot" announcements on 12 stations 
in New York, for the premiere, at the Roxy 
there, of "Wilson." The announcements will 
remind New Yorkers, from this week on, of 
the opening of the picture August 1. 



KIND WORDS 



INDUSTRY fights menace in building code 
trend Page 1 3 

USE of ad films in theatres increases 25 per 
cent in year Page 14 

EXTRA length features for this season 
increase forty per cent Page 19 

ON THE MARCH— Red Kann discusses the 
future of Paramount Page 22 

ATTORNEY General Biddle expected to see 
decree draft this week Page 22 

SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 



BOND drive plunges ahead in final week of 
theatre campaign Page 27 

FILM stock values rise $78,512,888 in summer 
bull market Page 28 

HOLLYWOOD guilds denounce Alliance and 
create new council Page 29 

MEXICAN guild head denies Mexican acton 
oppose dubbing of films Page 30 

BRITISH scientists foresee vast post-war en- 
tertainment changes Page 36 



Hollywood Scene 
In the Newsreels 
Managers' Round Table 



Page 33 Picture Grosses 

Page 40 Shorts on Broadway 

Page 49 What the Picture Did for Me 



IN PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION Advance Synopses 

Showmen's Reviews Page 1981 Release Chart by Companies 

Short Subjects Page 1982 The Release Chart 



Page 48 
Page 46 
Page 45 

Page 1983 > 
Page 1984 
Page 1986 



[Continued from preceding page] 

Expressions in behalf of Hollywood produc- 
tion and its personalities have been many and 
frequent. Fresh among them, and typical in 
its voice of sincerity, is a news article from 
the Los Angeles Times of June 27 which 
reports: 

To American soldiers in the jungles of the 
Southwest Pacific, seeing a motion picture is 
equivalent to a two-hour furlough home, Lt. 
Col. Joseph MeMicking told film colony execu- 
tives and other guests at a luncheon yester- 
day at the Beverly-Wilshire Hotel. 

fl Citing as proof of the morale value of 
pictures the fact that servicemen overseas 
will stand in drenching rain for the showing 
of a film, Col. MeMicking said that the 
G.I. Joes would vote for motion pictures if 
a ballot were taken to single out an entire 
industry to recognize for outstanding work 
in production. 

j-» "They would choose the motion picture 
iraJustry," the Colonel said, "which during 
the dark nights when they were alone with 
their God brought home closer to them and 
made a reality the ideal for which they are 
fighting." 

To end on a high statistical note, it is to 
be set down that Colonel MeMicking said 
that in April the overseas distribution of films 
had reached a total audience of 32,706,193 
attendances by service men and women at 
a total of 93,153 performances. Considering 
the probable number of fighters overseas, it 
would seem that they average about three 
shows a month on that great circuit which 
runs from Iceland around the world to the 
South Seas. — Terry Ramsaye 



The Johnston Story 

PUBLICATIONS East and West this week 
gave currency to a report that Will H. Hays, 
en route to Hollywood, was to confer there 
with Eric Johnston, president of the United 
States Chamber of Commerce, to "tender him 
the post of associate head" of the Motion Pic- 
ture Producers and Distributors of America. 
Inc. Authoritatively placed executive members 
of the association in New York on Wednes- 
day indicated that they had not been informed 
of any such projected meeting or negotiation 
to be conducted. 

It was held probable that the report was a 
reverberation growing out of conversations 
which were had with Mr. Johnston about a 
year ago and several months prior to his ex- 
cursion to Russia. 

"Will Hays is going strong, and Mr. Johnston 
has just been reelected for another year with 
the Chamber of Commerce, so it would seem 
that the situation of today is well stabilized," 
was an official observation. 



Tax Yields $200,000,000 

SECRETARY of the Treasury Henry Mor- 
genthau, Jr., announced in Washington Tues- 
day that a little over $200,000,000 was received 
in admission taxes for the fiscal year ended 
June 30. According to Internal Revenue Bu- 
reau figures, collections from the Federal tax 
on admissions increased tenfold in the past six 
years. Tax receipts for 1939 were $19,470,802, 
'increasing to $21,887,916 in 1940; $70,963,094 
in 1941; $115,032,269 in 1942 and $154,450,723 
in 1943. Under the new rate in effect since 
April 1, the 1943 revenue is expected to be 
doubled in the fiscal year now beginning. The 
box office reflection of a war economy bids fair 
to make the estimate a reality. 



Gloria in Bloom 

GLORIA Swanson, so long of fame and glory 
on the screen, has a star hit again, this time 
on the summer stage, in the flippantly titled 
comedy, "A Goose for the Gander." It opened 
in Cambridge at Brattle Hall and made a house 
record, and it has been a marked success in" 
a run at the Strand in Stamford, Conn., whence 
it is to go to the Blackstone in Chicago, with 
a pause at the Bucks County theatre in Phila- 
delphia. 

Ralph Forbes is co-starred in the show, writ- 
ten by Harold J. Kennedy, who coincidentally 
is a member of the cast with an especially fat 
part. 

Miss Swanson's last appearance before the 
camera was in "Father Takes A Wife," an 
RKO release of 1941. 



Back to School 

THE six-session course in How to Teach an 
Employee offered by the St. Louis Board of 
Education Distributive Education Department, 
has been completed by managers, assistant 
managers, head ushers and other members of 
the executive staffs of F & M's Fox, Missouri. 
Shubert and St. Louis theatres. 

The course, headed by Francis Wright, in- 
cluded 12 hours of instruction and was pat- 
terned aftei the college courses that are the 
product of war, developed by the U. S. Office' 
of Education to help executives in the teaching 
of new and inexperienced employees. 

Mr. Wright made it known that the course 
is available from state or local boards of edu- 
cation without cost. He recommended that 
theatres group together in other cities to take 
advantage of the distributive education pro- 
gram. 



8 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



if ode's Wallop 

AL HODE of Columbia has done a book, 
kt published by Gold Label Books, Inc., en- 
fled "This Hero Business," which is a whim- 
pally humorous consideration of the fight 
'jme, as seen through the antics of a prize 
'ioss-eyed palooka, who always saw two op- 
>nents in front of him and hit in between — 
'ith spectacular results. It is enjoying a heavy 
" e-publication sale. 

For the benefit of those who came in late, it 
ji to be set down that Mr. Hode really started 
career in the prize ring. One night at the 
,edford Athletic Club in Brooklyn, when he 
[as but fifteen years old, which is to say about 
'*04, young Mr. Hodes knocked out a very big 
jd very black person by the name of Isaac 

■ iley, full count, round three. The late Wil- 
im T. Rock, better known to fame as '"Pop" 
ock, one of the prospering founders of Vita- 
•aph, was at ringside with a bet on the boy. 
al was substantially snatched from the prize 
tig into movieland, right there. 

Under Rock-Vitagraph auspices Hal became 
/ojectionist, plumber's helper, and extra play- 

■ at the Vitagraph studios. He knows about 
Jiis industry. 



ifew Quota Test 

\ondon Bureau 

\ view of greatly increased wartime labor 

;ists the British Board of Trade, in a raerao- 
ndum distributed Tuesday in London to pro- 
bers, distributors, exhibitors and trade 
lions, recommended that upward revision in 
"e-war labor cost test figures might be neces- 
.ry. The board said that unless a new sta- 
tory order on film quota percentages was 

• ade and approved by Parliament before the 
id of December, the present wartime per- 
•ntages should be dropped and the higher per- 
ntages prescribed by the 1938 Quota Act 
rain should become effective. Distributor 
rcentages for feature pictures would rise 

iom 20 to and exhibitor percentages from 
b to 20j^. For shorts, the present percentages 

re 15 for distributors, \2y 2 for exhibitors. 

| is understood the board favors increasing the 
bor cost test figures to 25 shillings, about 

.5 per foot. 



lore Insurance 

Washington Bureau 

ii XTENSION of the Federal unemployment 
( >mpensation law to bring every employer and 
(very employee under its provisions will be 
abated in Congress possiblv this autumn, as 
tie of several measures dealing with the post- 
ar economic problems. So far as the film in- 
ustry is concerned, such an extension would 
ring in several thousand theatres, exchanges 
id other offices where less than eight persons 
Ijre employed. 

I Before the Senate recessed June 23, a report 
jrging extension of the law was filed with it 
jjy the special committee on post-war economic 
>licy and planning. The effect of such a step 
ould be to bring under the unemployment 
impensation measure a number of exhibitors 



throughout the country who are now exempt 
from the unemployment taxes because they em- 
ploy less than eight persons. On the other 
hand, it would extend protection to many thou- 
sands of workers who now are not eligible for 
unemployment relief. 

At present, approximately 30,400,000 work- 
ers are covered by the Federal law. The cur- 
rent labor force is approximately 54,000,000 
persons, and while several millions are agricul- 
tural workers and domestic employees to whom 
it is considered impractical to extend the law, 
it is indicated that other millions might be 
brought under its protection by extension to all 
employers and all employees in industry, dis- 
tribution and trade. 



Grant Takes Earle 

WARNERS' Earle theatre building, the only 
film house in downtown Philadelphia which 
features stage shows and the city's last link 
with vaudeville, was sold last Thursday for a 
reported price of $1,650,000, by the Stanley- 
Company to the W. T. Grant Realty Corpora- 
tion. The Grant company, which operates a 
nationwide chain of five-and-dime stores,' even- 
tually will build a four-story department store 
on the site. 

The building, assessed at $2,563,000, orig- 
inallv erected in 1923 at an estimated cost of 
$5,000,000 by Stanley and B. F. Keith, was 
named for the late George H. Earle, Jr., who 
had a financial interest in the Stanley com- 
pany. The theatre at one time was considered 
one of the finest vaudeville houses in America, 
ranking close to Broadway's Palace. 

The Earle building comprises the 3,000-seat 
theatre, a six-story office building housing the 
headquarters of the Warner theatre circuit in 
the area, several theatrical agencies and ground- 
floor shops. Warners will continue operation 
of the theatre, stores and offices until the con- 
templated Grant project can get under way, 
probably immediately after the war. 



Screen Biography 

HARRY SHERMAN, one of the best known 
of producers of Western pictures, is planning 
to bring back to life one of the best known of 
western stars, Tom Mix, friend and hero of 
countless youngsters of all ages. 

The life of Tom Mix before entering pictures 
had all the elements of a grouping of all the 
best of the Western film fare. While still in his 
teens he first experienced the smell of gun- 
powder as a scout in the Spanish-American 
war, in Cuba and later in the Philippines, and 
went on from there to join in the battle of Tien- 
tsin in China. From the wars he returned to 
this continent, to the southwest, and became 
a Texas Ranger. He once bagged no less than 
55 rootin' tootin' two gun bandits, but he did 
not take all of them alive. Later he became a 
United States marshal, and from there went 
into pictures, to become one of the great stars 
of Western drama. 

Born in 1880, Tom Mix died in October of 
1940 near Florence, Ariz., when his car got out 
of control and crashed. He always had his 
horses and guns well under control. 



Early Bird 

ONE of the first newspapers in the country to 
enter the television field is Walter Annenberg's 
Philadelphia Inquirer, morning paper, which 
has filed an application for a commercial tele- 
vision license. Publisher Annenberg is known 
to have negotiated for the purchase of a local 
radio station, and his application for a tele- 
vision license follows closely the purchase of 
WPEN in Philadelphia and its FM adjunct 
by the Evening Bulletin. 

Last October Mr. Annenberg purchased a 
plot of ground right next door to the present 
Inquirer building and at that time indicated 
that a number of projects were in mind for 
post-war construction. It is understood that 
the proposed television station will be built on 
the plot. 

Marshall Field, millionaire playboy and pub- 
lisher of PM and the Chicago Sun, has filed 
application with the Federal Communications 
Commission for the purchase of radio station 
WSAI, one of the twin stations in Cincinnati 
owned by the Crosley interests. Under the 
FCC rule against multiple ownership, Crosley 
had been ordered to divest itself of one of the 
stations. WLW, being the most powerful in 
the midwest, the company offered WSAI for 
sale. 



Look Looks 

LOOK magazine, the pictorial weekly owned 
by Gardner Cowles, Jr., Iowa publisher, and 
his brothers, is eyeing the radio and motion 
picture fields. The magazine, in conjunction 
with the Embassy and Telenews newsreel 
theatres, is sponsoring a series of topical short 
subjects, based on articles appearing in the 
magazine. They are being produced by News- 
reel Distributors, Inc., and have been sold to 
about 40 theatres, it is reported. Three tele- 
vision shows are also being produed by Look 
for presentation over WRGB, the General 
Electric station in Schenectady. They are 
under the supervision of Al Perkins, film and 
radio editor of the publication. Look is also 
looking into the film industry war activities, 
planning to publish an illustrated book on the 
subject. 



Candy Output Cut 

SHORTAGES of cocoa beans, employees and 
packing materials are preventing the candy in- 
dustry from supplying much more than half 
the needs of the armed forces and about one- 
quarter of the civilian demand, including prod- 
uct for candy machines in film theatres, Irving 
C. Shaffer, president of the Association of 
Manufacturers of Confectionery and Chocolate, 
announced in New York last week. He esti- 
mated that the supply of cocoa beans in the 
U. S., as of June 1, 1944, was 1,370,000 bags 
of 140 to 160 pounds, while the normal supply 
based on the average of 1938 to 1940 was 3,- 
500,000 to 3,750,000 bags. In manpower, the 
industry had only about 60 per cent of the 
normal number of employees and needed at 
least 150 per cent, with better than 50 per 
cent of production going to the armed forces. 



I'OTION PICTURE HERALD, published every Saturday by Quigley Publishing Company, Rockefeller Center, New York City, 20. Telephone Circle 7-3100; Cable address "Quigpubco, New 
[ ork." Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, Vice-President; Red Kann, Vice-President; T. J. Sullivan, Secretary; Terry Ramsaye, Editor; James D. Ivers, News Editor; Ray Gallagher, 
•. .dvertising Manager; Chicago Bureau, 624 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 5; Hollywood Bureau, Postal Union Life Building, Hollywood, 28. William R. Weaver, editor; Toronto Bureau, 
I "-2 Millwood Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, W. M. Gladish, correspondent; _ Montreal Bureau, 265 Vitre St., West, Montreal, Canada, Pat Donovan, correspondent; London Bureau, 
I Golden Square, London W I, Hope Williams Burnup, manager; Peter Burnup, editor; cable Quigpubco London; Melbourne Bureau, The Regent Theatre, 191 Collins St., Melbourne, Australia, 
l-liff Holt, correspondent; Sydney Bureau, 17 Archbold Rd., Roseville, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia, Lin Endean, correspondent; Mexico City Bureau, Dr. Carmona y Valle 6, Mexico City, 
uis Becerra Celis, correspondent; Buenos Aires Bureau, J. E. Uriburi 126, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Natalio Bruski, correspondent; Rio de Janeiro Bureau, R. Sao Jose, 61, C. Postal 834, Rio 
le Janeiro, Brazil, Alfredo C. Machado, correspondent; Montevideo Bureau, P. O. Box 664, Montevideo, Uruguay, Paul Bodo, correspondent; cable Argus Montevideo. Member Audit Bureau 
f Circulations. All contents copyright 1944 by Quigley Publishing Company, Address all correspondence to the New York Office, Other Quigley Publications: Better Theatres, Motion Picture 
aily, International Motion Picture Almanac, and Fame. 



IOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



9 



THIS WEEK 



the Camera reports: 




HONORED. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph McMicking, right, was chief speaker 
and guest at a Hollywood luncheon tendered last week by the local WAC. 
An aide to General Douglas MacArthur, ground commander in the 
Southwest Pacific, he described how much the industry's 16-mm. free films 
mean to fighting men. Above, with Colonel McMicking, are 
John C. Flinn, WAC Hollywood coordinator; Mary McCall, Jr., 
local WAC chairman, and Jesse Lasky, producer. 




CONVENTION. Paramount's Canadian sales personnel met last week 

at Toronto. Above are, seated (left to right), Oscar Morgan, Gordon Lightstone, 

Charles M. Reagan and Robert M. Gillham; back row (left to right), 

Bill Kelly, manager, Calgary; Win Barron, sales promotion, Toronto; John 

Casey, salesman, Winnipeg; Harold Pfaff, salesman, Ontario; Bob Murphy, 

booker, Ontario; W. J. O'Neill, secretary-treasurer of Paramount Film Service; 

H. Q. Burns, ad sales, Toronto; David Brickman, Winnipeg; 

Ambrose Theurer, salesman, Ontario; Russell Simpson, branch manager, 

Vancouver; Pat Hogan, manager, St. Johns; Jack Hunter, manager, Ontario; 

Tom Dowbiggin, manager, Montreal; Romeo Goudreau, Bill Young, Montreal. 




"FUZZY WUZZIES" and Jap plane fragments, 
Southwest Pacific G.I. Joe Oscars, were awarded 
Sunday night, in Hollywood, on the radio Army Hour, 
to Greer Garson, "best actress", Humphrey Bogart, 
"best actor", and to Jack L. Warner, for 
"Casablanca", "best picture". 




By Staff Photographer 

A LIFE MEMBERSHIP gold card is handed, above, 
to Father John Boland, right, former New York State 
Labor Relations Board chairman, by Herman Gelber, 
president of Local 306, New York projectionists' union. 
The ceremonies, at the Adelphi theatre, last Thursday, 
accompanied presentation to the Army of an 
equipped field ambulance, seen in the background. 
At the far left, seated, is the other gold card recipient, 
New York License Commissioner Paul Moss. 




AT PRC'S fifth annual convention, in New York, last week 
Leo McCarthy, general sales manager; Lieutenant Com- 
mander Bert Kulick, New York franchise holder, 
and Leon Fromkess, vice-president. 



ic 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



|0R RECORD-BREAKING Bond sales, Eugene Meyers, 
ght, Manhattan WAC Bond drive chairman, is con- 
ratulated by Charles C. Moskowitz, left, WAC New York 
eneral chairman. Mr. Meyers' division sold 
3,995,385 worth. Watching are Oscar Doob and 
obert J. O'Donnell, Fifth War Loan drive chairman. 



LAUNCHING the S. S. Benjamin Warner. Harry J. Kaiser, left, shipbuilder 
at whose Permanente Metal yards in Richmond, Cal., the launching took 
place last Saturday, and Harry M. Warner, son of the late Benjamin 
Warner, who, with his brother, Jack L., participated in the ceremonies 
honoring their father. They paid tribute to the American merchant marine. 




VISITOR in New York. 
Jim Keefe, exploiteer for 
Twentieth Century- Fox in 
Cincinnati and Cleve- 
land, visited the 
Motion Picture Herald 
offices in Radio City while 
east on a visit to the 
home office and for 
a vacation. 




ty Staff Photographer 



SAM WOOD, producer and director of 65 features, holds the 
plaque presented him by Leo Spitz and William Goetz, right, chair- 
man and president of International Pictures, for which Mr. Wood 
now works. A spectator, left, is producer Nunnally Johnson. 





HE SCENE above, of some dramatic — and comedy — import, is from 
Columbia's "The Impatient Years", to be released about September 7. The 
principals are Lee Bowman, Charles Coburn and Jean Arthur. 



WINNER. Universal eastern division manager 

Fred Meyers, left, hands to New Haven branch manager 

John Pavone the check the latter won in the 

Bill Scully Anniversary sales drive. District manager 

John Scully watches the presentation with interest. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



i I 



Pete Smith, producer. 



Melville Danner, exhibitor. 



Koxy Theatre, on Main Street in Granite, Oklahoma. 



PREMIERE WOWS GRANITE' 



By Staff Correspondent 

This Saturday is Melville Darner's day in 
Granite, rock-ribbed Ail-American town of 
quarries, cotton gins and breweries out here 
in sunkissed Oklahoma. 

Mr. Danner is the manager of the Kozy The- 
atre, two hundred and fifty seats, This is the 
first world premiere ever held in Granite, the 
first in Oklahoma. 

The premiere launches the world screen 
career of a master opus in one reel produced 
by Pete Smith of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, for 
Loews' Inc., under the title of "Movie Pests." 
But the notion came from Granite. 

As so commonly happens with the truly 
great efforts of Hollywood, the fame of this 
picture has preceded it and among the press 
announcements which flowed over the wires 
in tidings of the day's events in Granite was 
the announcement from the lobby of The Kozy 
that Charles P. Skouras, president of National 
Theatres Amusement Company in Los Angeles, 
had booked the picture for his entire circuit. He 
plays subsequent to the Kozy. 

Reel Is a Must, Said Skouras 

"This reel is a must," said Mr. Skouras' 
message. "I can see how audiences will react." 

In the metabolism tests which MGM gives 
to its product in experimental previews before 
the provincial audiences of Los Angeles 
suburbs, this product registered 49 laughs in 
800 feet. Mr. Smith registered a complaint 
with the management of the preview house 
on the ground that the audience mirth kept 
him from hearing himself talk on the screen. 
His pass was refunded. 

This was gleaned from a strictly confiden- 
tial letter which Mr. Smith wrote Herbert 
Morgan of the home office. 

A late report from the box office checkers 
indicated that by midnight the entire popula- 
tion of Granite, 1,058 persons, Federal count, 
and a considerable number from outlying pre- 
cincts would have seen the show. 

Today's great event and the motion picture 
it honors took its origin with a letter from 
Mr. Danner to the editor of Motion Picture 
Herald, when he wrote saying "Here is an 
idea for a short subject. Every exhibitor has 
the following troubles." "While I write, I am 
thinking of Pete Smith," said Mr. Danner. "I 
believe he could make a good picture of it." The 
Herald put a head on the letter "Assignment to 
Pete Smith" and published it, October 23, 1943. 



No. 7 is the public 
enemy who puts his feet 
out in the aisle, not tor 
lack of room but for 
lack of anything in his 
head, along with a gen- 
eral attitude of "I don't 
care." 



No. 2 is the expansive 
person who fixes his 
gaze on the screen and 
practically undresses 
with tarHung elbows, 
tossing his topcoat into 
the surprised eyes of 
the adjacent spectators. 



No. 3 is the woman, 
some call her a lady, 
who wears aloft the 
proud plumage of her 
brave new hat, an au- 
thentic copy of a genu- 
ine original designed ex- 
clusively for the Cherrv 
Sisfers. 





12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



INDUSTRY FIGHTS MENACE 
IN BUILDING CODE TREND 



Changes for State of New 
York, Sequel to Boston 
Fire, Alarm Theatremen 

.by GEORGE SCHUTZ 

^Editor of BETTER THEATRES 

Motion picture theatres throughout the State 
of New York outside the larger cities are 
threatened with drastic requirements, involving 
fundamental structural changes, by proposed 
revisions of the state building code. Aroused 
by the changes, drawn up under the authority 
'of the Labor Department as more stringent 
safety measures, the principal circuits, includ- 
ing Loew's, Paramount, RKO, Century, Schine 
and Skouras, have appointed a committee to 
iseek modification of the proposals. 

The committee, headed by Harry Moskow- 
ltz of Loew's and including Henry Anderson 
of Paramount and Louis Lazar of Schine Thea- 
tres, with Martin J. Tracy of the Century Cir- 
cuit, New York City, as alternate, this week 
began studies upon which to base arguments 
for reconsideration. 

.Fire Curtains and Emergency 
Stairs To Be Required 

Provisions in the revised regulations which 
have caused most immediate concern are: 

Every theatre with a stage must have a fire 
curtain of steel frame with the necessary auto- 
matic lowering devices. This would have to be 
done within one year of the date the code went 
into effect, in existing as well as new theatres. 

Emergency stairways {fire escapes) higher 
rhan 10 feet must be enclosed by fireproof con- 
struction (stair towers). Counterbalanced fire 
escapes attached to the building outside are 
prohibited. 

In general, the revised code would require 
compliance by existing theatres within two 
years from ffib date of its adoption. It does 
not apply to cities which already have build- 
ing codes. It would affect hundreds of thea- 
tres in the smaller cities and towns ; in many 
instances it would have the practical effect of 
closing small theatres permanently. 

This threat, it is pointed out, is of signifi- 
cance not only to exhibitors in the State of 
New York, with its approximately 1,200 mo- 
tion picture theatres, but is greatly broadened 
by the fact that New York codes are widely 
referred to by authorities in other states in 
drawing up their building regulations. 

J Several Other States Are 
\Planning Revisions 

According to J. Henry Walters, RKO attor- 
Iney and former New York State Senator, who 

■ was instrumental in bringing the proposed 
I regulations to the attention of theatre inter- 
Bests, some eight or nine states have been re- 
examining their building regulations in conse- 
jquence of the Coconut Grove night club fire in 
I Boston in 1942. 

"There is great danger," he said, "that if 
I the proposed New York requirements . are al- 
lowed to stand, they will be adopted elsewhere. 

■ Such requirements as a steel proscenium cur- 
[tain, and inside stair towers in place of fire 
[escapes, would put many theatres out of busi- 

yy 

ness. 

( Failure thus to distinguish between motion 
picture theatres making only limited and rare 



LAW vs. DESIGN 

Revision of the New York State build- 
ing code governing buildings of public 
assembly without prior reference either 
to the economics of the theatre business 
or to the resources of the designer, is 
quite according to an established pro- 
cedure which, it now may be realized, 
serves neither the business nor the public 
well. Safety is a quality in a theatre 
which emerges from the whole design; 
specific restrictions should be related to 
that design, particularly to the entire 
traffic-seating system. 

The New York revisions are among the 
first to follow the Cocoanut Grove 
nightclub fire in Boston; that catastro- 
phe, though remote to conditions of 
motion picture theatres, has inspired 
similar efforts in other states. Here may 
well be an opportunity to effect at last 
a constructive approach nationally to 
the problems of theatre safety, aimed at 
achieving a uniform code, and a modern 
one. That is an industry-wide matter 
which apparently is of some urgency as 
we move closer to a period of renewed 
construction. — G.S. 



use of a stage or screen platform and those 
presenting regular stage performances is cited 
as one aspect of a general defect of the re- 
vised code, which in the main, classifies motion 
picture theatres with night clubs and road 
houses in its treatment of the safety problems. 
Practical separation of theatres from buildings 
of entirely different function and physical char- 
acter, and of motion picture from stage or 
combination theatres, is seen by the committee 
as urgently needed to make the code feasible. 

Theatremen Not Consulted 
When Changes Were Made 

While the New York circuit representatives 
who have attended several meetings on the 
proposals have voiced themselves as naturally 
in sympathy with any efforts to make theatres 
as safe as possible, it is pointed out that the 
changes were formulated without consultation 
with theatre owners and engineers who could 
have helped to achieve the desired result with- 
out imposing extreme burdens on the theatrical 
enterprises least able to shoulder them. A 
general character of impracticality is indicated 
in the changes by the time limit prescribed for 
the installation of a steel fire curtain. Certain- 
ly not until after the war, and perhaps not for 
a considerable period afterward, would steel 
frame curtains be available. 

Building inside emergency stairways also 
would encounter wartime restrictions, and the 
requirement also would find many theatres 
without the land or other physical conditions 
necessary for it, especially in view of other 
proposed requirements for exit access to a 
street. 

Doubt also is voiced that inside stair towers 
in place of outside fire escapes represent an 
increase in safety. 

"I wonder," said one member of the com- 



mittee who has been closely associated with 
safety problems for years, "if we can be sure 
that in the event of fire people would feel safer 
in a stairway closed off from outdoors, a pas- 
sageway that is essentially a part of the in- 
terior of the building, then thay would feel on 
an outdoor fire escape. And after all, the great- 
est danger from fire in a theatre is not one of 
flames but of panic." 

Feels Code Revision Should 
Be an Industry Affair 

"Now that this situation has risen," he add- 
ed, "it may very well be that this matter of 
building code revision should be considered an 
industry affair. The attitude of the industry 
toward safety measures is of course one of 
wholehearted cooperation. Even if we were 
entirely selfish in the matter, and we aren't, 
we would want to take every precaution to 
avoid disaster since just one of any size would 
frighten many people from theatres for a long 
time afterward. But it might be better to study 
the problem as a matter of theatre engineer- 
ing rather than to impose arbitrary restrictions 
and requirements unrelated to theatre designs." 

This latter point of view was essentially that 
of Ben Schlanger, New York theatre architect, 
who is chairman of the theatre construction 
sub-committee of the Society of Motion Picture 
Engineers. "The code as a whole," he said, 
represents an unscientific handling of the safe- 
ty problem of motion picture theatres. A much 
simpler code could be written that would 
achieve a greater degree of safety and not be 
burdensome to any exhibitor. 

"In fact, the code is not clear enough to as- 
sure safe conditions. For example, all kinds 
of passageways are discussed in the code, but 
their specific applications to specific conditions 
are not at all clear. Why shouldn't an open 
projecting cement passageway, properly sup- 
ported at an upper level, be just as safe as a 
cement exit court walk at street level ? 

"What kind of auditorium chairs are meant ? 
In one place the code stipulates minimum back- 
to-back spacing of 30 inches. In another it re- 
quires a distance of 12 inches between the back 
of a chair and the front of the seat of the chair 
behind. With modern auditorium chairs, that 
distance of 12 inches would give you a back-to- 
back space of 37^4 inches. 

"And in any case, a back-to-back spacing of 
30 inches is not compatible with safety in in- 
stallations of the kind of chairs installed in mo- 
tion picture theatres. 

Points Out Incongruities in 
Relation of Design to Code 

"The whole system and layout of exits, stair- 
ways and so on is not a thing by itself, but is 
related in point of safety to the seating plan. It 
should be so related in a building code. 

"And nowhere does the code refer to stadi- 
um-type seating arrangements, which is of 
growing importance for small theatres. 

"Many of the smaller theatres, of course, 
would not be able to meet the requirement for 
a steel fire curtain. The construction neces- 
sary for this would amount in weight and cost 
to as much as the rest of the building." 

The New York State Labor Department has 
not specified a date on which the revised code 
is to go into effect, and has indicated this 
would not be done until the theatre committee 
had been heard. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



13 



AD FILM USE IN THEATRES 
INCREASES 25% IN YEAR 

4 



Employs Market Research 
Methods; Estimates on 
Theatre Revenue Vary 

Motion picture advertising in theatres, of 
the short message variety, which suffered a 
setback at the start of the war, has increased 
25 per cent over last year. 

Advertising film producers and distributors 
attribute the gain to the decrease in news- 
paper advertising space brought about by the 
shortage in newsprint stock and to accelera- 
ted circuit theatre use of screen ad films. This 
was a direct result of the order handed down 
to the ad film industry last year by the Federal 
Trade Commission, on the basis of its find- 
ings, ordering distributors to cease making 
"exclusive" contracts with exhibitors and to 
cease price-fixing. 

Conservative estimates place the total rev- 
enue to exhibitors from the showing of ad- 
vertising films between $2,500,000 and $3,000,- 
000 annually. Others say the revenue yearly 
is somewhere between $8,000,000 and $10,000,- 
000. One advertising agency executive recent- 
ly estimated there were approximately 11,400 
theatres in the country which show ad films, 
but distributors consider this a high figure, cal- 
culating that 7,500 to 8,000 is nearer the fact. 

Applying Marketing 
Research to Films 

The advertising picture business has entered 
a new phase, say the men in the field. No 
longer are "hit or miss" methods used to de- 
termine for the advertiser whether his picture 
has been shown and how many theatre patrons 
have seen it. The distributors are at work with 
graphs and charts and card indexes plotting 
a course through the hitherto uncharted sea 
of the "X" in theatre advertising. 

Ad film distributors also are attempting to 
apply the researches of sales marketing and 
consumer potentials which the newspaper, 
magazine and radio industries have developed 
over a period of years. 

Meanwhile, advertising agencies, who place 
most of the theatre advertising for their clients 
and represent the nation's largest advertisers, 
are preparing their plans for television, study- 
ing technical developments in the event that 
television takes precedence in the sponsored 
field, one agency official reports. 

The increase, however, in theatre advertis- 
ing had come mainly from local merchants and 
local manufacturers, one distributor explained. 
The use of the screen for brief messages on 
national products had dropped considerably 
since the war, he said, adding that after the 
war, this phase of the business was bound to 
recover. 

Producing Many Shorts 
For Government Units 

Soon after Pearl Harbor, when the War 
Production Board curtailed the supply of raw 
stock for ad films, producers and distributors 
were forced to fill out their contracts with 
pictures made from stock on hand. In the past 
year, however, at least two of the larger com- 
panies, Screen Broadcasts, whose parent com- 
pany is Motion Picture Advertising, and Alex- 
ander Film Company, have been producing 
pictures averaging one minute in length for 
Government agencies, including the Treasury 

14 



CONGRESSMEN TO REACH 
VOTERS VIA TRAILERS 

Stumping for reelection to Congress 
in November, through the use of a one- 
minute short, is the plan of Marshall L 
Faber, owner of Business Films in Wash- 
ington. Jennings Randolph of West Vir- 
ginia, chairman of the House District 
Committee, is the first Congressman to 
go before the cameras. Mr. Faber 
expects that many others will follow. 
He plans to make the shorts in his 
Washington studios, using newly in- 
stalled RCA studio sound equipment. 
The idea is that Congressmen who seek 
reelection in November can send the 
films back home and get their elec- 
tioneering appeals across while attend- 
ing to business in Washington. The 
films are designed for theatrical and 
non-theatrical showings. 



Department, WPB, War Manpower Commis- 
sion, Office of Price Administration and Fed- 
eral Security Administration. The films have 
been sold to advertisers who sponsor them for 
showing in theatres. 

According to Harold Clark, executive of 
Motion Picture Advertising in New York, 
more circuit houses are playing ad pictures 
than ever before and this means, too, "that a 
better quality of theatre is carrying advertis- 
ing." The public, he said, "has become more 
accustomed and conditioned to advertising on 
the screen, briefly and entertainingly pre- 
sented." 

"The guesswork regarding attendance, which 
was the greatest deterrent in the development 
of this business, is rapidly being taken out of 
the business," he said. 

Claim Guaranteed Theatre 
Circulation Provided 

Through a thorough and extensive system 
of cataloguing and indexing, the company, 
which has headquarters in New Orleans, is 
determining for the advertiser his potential 
circulation buy in the theatre field, Mr. Clark 
said. The cost of theatre advertising to the spon- 
sor is based on a sliding scale. 

"For the first time, the advertiser is guaran- 
teed theatre circulation," Mr. Clark declared. 
"When he buys circulation in the newspaper, 
magazine or radio field he knows what he is 
getting for his milline rate. But for years 
there hasn't been any attempt to break down 
theatre circulation for the advertiser and as a 
result, his distribution costs were too high 
compared with the results* obtained." 

Payment to the advertiser for ad films on 
the basis of a Ross Federal check, has been 
worked out by one producer-distributor, As- 
sociated Film Makers, which works entirely in 
the field of the one and two-reel institutional 
type of picture instead of the straight, brief 
ad message. 

Stanley Neal, president of the company, ex- 
plained that Associated had an exclusive con- 
tract with Ross for the purpose of checking 
theatre showings and attendance reached by 



the ad film. The advertiser pays Associated 
on the basis of the Ross check. According to 
the agreement, the checker gives the closing 
and opening attendance figures of the theatre. 
He reports what film preceded and followed the 
showing of the advertising picture and also 
the number of showings each day. 

Mr. Neal, . who pioneered in screen adver- 
tising, having produced sponsored films in > 
England more than 15 years ago, believes 
"there is no place on the screen for blatant ad- 
vertising. The public doesn't want to see it. 
The institutional type of picture which is com- 
parable in quality to the best short produced 
by any major film company, in my opinion, is 
the only suitable advertising picture for the 
theatre, and I have found that, generally speak- 
ing, exhibitors are willing to accept that kind 
of film. 

Theatre Circulation Has Been 
Haphazard Up to Now 

"The advertiser wants to buy circulation not 
only in newspapers, magazines and radio, but 
in theatres. Buying circulation in theatres, up 
to now, has been pretty haphazard," Mr. Neal 
said, "but now that we offer advertisers the 
Ross Federal service, they can get an accurate 
accounting of their circulation." 

General Screen Advertising, one of the 
larger distributors of the brief ad film which 
has copyrighted the name of "Minute Movies," 
also has attempted to keep complete records of 
weekly attendance figures on theatres which 
place its pictures. According to J. Don Alex- 
ander, chairman of the board of General Screen 
and president of Alexander Film Company, 
producing unit, the advertiser and advertising 
agency now can get ad campaign figures and 
costs, predetermined in advance, for any cities 
or markets under consideration. 

General, which has its offices in Chicago, 
has opened a New York sales office at 500 
Fifth Avenue. R. S. Evans, formerly manager 
of the New York branch for Jam Handy, pro- 
ducers of industrial films, is in charge. 

Mr. Alexander estimated that the annual 
revenue to exhibitors from ad films ran about 
$2,500,000 to $3,000,000. He said that Alex- 
ander Film Company placed about $45,000,000 
worth of business in the 25 years it had been 
in existence. A large part of the business was 
in the foreign market before the war, export- 
ing pictures to 28 foreign countries, particu- 
larly in South America, South Africa, Spain 
and Portugal. 

Can Absorb Annually Only 
Six Two-Reel Ad Films 

Experience in the sponsored film field, sev- 
eral agency officials maintain, has shown that 
the motion picture theatre can absorb only 
about six two-reel advertising pictures a year, 
"and these, mind you," as one executive said, 
"are high-quality, educational, informative and 
entertaining institutional films with no direct 
advertising appeal." 

This view is opposed by Mr. Neal and others, 
who claim that the exhibitor will take a good 
two-reeler, especially if he gets paid for it, as 
often as the distributor makes such films avail- 
able to him. 

For the most part, advertising agency ex- 
ecutives who handle motion picture production 
and distribution for their clients are dubious 
as to the future of the two-reeler in the theatre. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



Tops Record-breaking Grosses of "Standing Room Only" 
and "Miracle of Morgan's Creek" 
in First Dates of 




Fighting Fifth War Loan ! 




BEATS "MIRACLE" BY 
28% AT WORTH, FORT WORTH,, ,14% AT 
MAJESTIC, HOUSTON ... 14% AT LINCOLN, 
LINCOLN . , .15% AT MAJESTIC, DALLAS! 

BEATS "STANDING ROOM ONLY" BY 
26% AT ORPHEUM, OMAHA ... 10% AT 
CRITERION, OKLAHOMA CITYS 

The swingy, zingy story of four singing sis- 
rers and the big, bad bandleader who tried 
to make love to the whole darned family! 

With the stars of three great 1944 Paramount 
comedies... all united in one super show! 



-RIDING HIGH-ER" THAN EVER! 



WHO STOOD EM UP IN STANDING ROOM ONLY" 




•THE MIRACLE (Go/) Of MORGAN'S CREEK" 



with 



SASSY NEW STAR OF "MIRACLE" 

andMIMI CHANDLER 

RAYMOND WALBURN • EDDIE FOY, Jr. 



Screen Play by Melvin Frank and Norman Panama • Based 
on a Story by Claude Binyon 



THE FIRST REVIEWS 
ARE HEAVENLY! 

"Orchids !" from 

Walter Winchell 

"Freshest, sprightliest 
bit . . . to bounce up in 
a long time!" 

— Liberty Magazine 






,\v° 



"No wonder they're going my way 
^ into the New York Paramount" — 

/ N. unless "Going My Way" 

runs forever* at 
this ace Broadway 
house! 




THE TRADE REVIEWS 
ARE DOWN TO EARTH! 

"Definitely a 'must' picture 
. . . songs will be whistled 
on highways and byways." 

— Boxoffice 

"Crammed with solid 
laughs, okay tunes . . . 
should sing a merry enter- 
tainment tune as first class 
film fare." — Daily Variety 

"Customers will laugh 
themselves silly . . . swell 
song numbers, topnotch 
cast, unusual story idea." 
— Showmen's Trade Review 



(*10lh WEEK AND STIll BREAKING ALL-TIMS RECORDS/) 



(Aft. ft- 



(extra length pictures for 
this year increase 40% 



more Features Exceeding 
100 Minutes Than in 1943; 
"Short Features" Down 

While pictures are fewer, they're running 
onger. Since January, 1942, there has been 
i steady rise in the number of films running 
100 minutes or more and a sharp drop in prod- 
uct after the first year of war, particularly 
rarked among the shorter films. 

If films continue to be released this year at 
Jie rate they have been made available during 
the first six months— and there appears no rea- 
son at this time for a change in pattern — 1944 
product will be more than 10 per cent less than 
:hat of 1942, and slightly less than last year's. 
At the same time, the prospect is for almost 
:\vice as many pictures as in 1942 running 100 
r.inutes or more, and 40 per cent more than 
n 1943. Of these a much larger number will 
De two hours or more in length. Films in this 
Category released so far in 1944 already have 
'exceeded the output for the whole of 1942 or 
,1943. 

Half of Product Before 
Less Than 70 Minutes 

Last year and the year before, showmen 
found half the available product in the "short 
Mature" class — Westerns, program musicals, 
remedies and dramas with a running time less 
than 70 minutes. In 1944 this group is no 
longer so important a part of the total product. 
Only 43 per cent of the features have a running 
time between 50 and 69 minutes. 

Films running between 70 and 85 minutes, 
which made up a quarter of 1942's total prod- 
uct, were noticeably fewer in 1943, constitut- 
ing a little more than a fifth of that year's re- 
leases. They have remained at the lower level 
during the current year. 

The number of pictures in the next group, 
running from 86 to 99 minutes, should be very 
Jclose in all three years. These films, however, 
formed only 13 per cent of 1942 product, but 
J bulk larger in the shorter schedules of 1943 
land 1944. 

Passing the hundred-minute mark, the new 
trend becomes more evident. In 1942, only 
eight per cent of the features ran an hour and 
40 minutes or more. Seven films were more 
J than two hours in length. In 1943 the figure 
'rose to 10 per cent, with nine films over two 
hours. Through June of this year 17 per cent 
\ of the releases ran more than 100 minutes, 
i Ten of these, representing five distributors, 
j were between 120 and 160 minutes in length. 
1 Warner Bros., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and 
" Paramount consistently have offered two-hour 
films among their top product. United Artists, 
Twentieth Century-Fox, RKO Radio and 
Universal have had occasional long releases. 
Present indications are that the trend will con- 
j tinue upward. 

Longest of This Season 
Runs 157 Minutes 

The longest film released so far this year, 
Twentieth-Fox's "Song of Bernadette," runs 
157 minutes, more than a quarter of an hour 
longer than ''They Died With Their Boots 
i On," which topped 1942's product in the mat- 
ter of length. The high for 1943 was still 
greater — 168 minutes for Paramount's "For 
Whom the Bell Tolls" — although this probably 





1942 1945 1944 


'7% 












16 












15 












14 












15 






f 






12 












11 

10 




















9 

8 


* 






















IOO MIN. or 


OVER 





194-2 1945 1944 


27% 
2b 






















25 












2+ 
25 






















22 












21 












20 
19 






















18 












70-84 MIN. 



will be exceeded by the end of the current year. 
Final running time for David Selznick's "Since 
You Went Away," a United Artists release, 
has not yet been announced, but is expected to 
fall a bit short of the all-time high of 220 min- 
utes for his "Gone With the Wind." 

While "Gone With the Wind" in 1939 was 
unique in its length, the fact is that in 1944 
two-hour pictures are no longer rarities. 
Among current releases, "Mr. Skeffington" 
runs 127 minutes; "Going My Way," 127 min- 
utes; "The White Cliffs of Dover," 126 min- 
utes; "The Story of Dr. Wassell," 136 minutes. 
"An American Romance," shortly to be re- 
leased by MGM, is 151 minutes long and 
"Dragon Seed" from the same company will 
reach 144. "Wilson," a 20th-Fox special, 
should join the group before the end of the 
summer with 163 minutes by the most recent 
count. 

The problem of programming arising from 
the decrease in product and the lengthening 
of individual features, which has faced show- 
men generally, has been felt particularly in 
houses with a double bill policy. Prospects of 
too few features and too long a show have en- 
couraged the single feature in some situations. 

There have been moves on the part of dis- 
tributors to meet both difficulties. The shortage 
of new features has been eased in some meas- 





1942 1945 1944 


20% 












19 












18 












17 












lb 












15 












14 












15 












12 












It 














85-99 


MIN. 





1942 1945 1944 


51% 

5a 


* 




















49 










48 












47 












46 












45 












44 












45 












42 












50-69 min. 



ure by reissues. Some of these, including 6 
Westerns and 10 features from Warners, the 
Gene Autry re-releases from Republic and 
RKO's "Snow White," have been incorporated 
into the season's product schedules, receiving 
the same attention as new product. Others 
have been made available to exhibitors by the 
major companies, or by independents. 

Problem Partly Met by 
Two-Reel Short Subjects 

The second problem, that of increased fea- 
ture length, has been met in part by marked 
increase in two-reel shorts. 

Since 1942 four companies have added 
"featurettes" running 18 minutes or more, to 
their short subject schedules. Paramount's 
"Musical Parade" in Technicolor and Warners' 
"Sanat Fe Trail Westerns," which were intro- 
duced late in 1943, tell a complete story in this 
abbreviated span. RKO, which added "This 
Is America" to its schedule of shorts in 1942, 
is reviving some of its former "Headliner" 
musicals this season. Still available in the 
group of longer shorts are Columbia's "All 
Star Comedies," 20th-Fox's "March of Time," 
Universal's "Name Band Musicals," RKO's 
Leon Errol and Edgar Kennedy comedies and 
the 2-reel specials released by MGM, Universal 
and Warners. 



THE four graphs above trace the percentage of the product for 1942, 1943 and 1944 which 
fell within each of four categories of running time. The trend for 1944 was extended from 
the base established by product so far released. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



19 




1 



\ \\ 



V 



Following a nationwide Roadshow record established in less 
than a thousand situations and unequalled by any attraction 
in the history of motion pictures, with only one exception, 
"FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" will be withdrawn 
from release at advanced admission prices on AUGUST 1st, 1944. 



There will be no further engagements of the picture between 
:his date and FEBRUARY, 1945. 

In FEBRUARY, 1945, Paramount will release "FOR 
WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" for showing at regular admis- 
ion prices. 

This is in conformity with Paramount's pledge to the indus- 
:ry that "FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" would not be 
shown anywhere in this country at popular prices until 1945. 

To all theatre men who joined with us in showing "FOR 
WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" on its Roadshow basis, 
Paramount acknowledges with thanks a showman's job super- 
latively done. 

To the many thousands more exhibitors who will play "FOR 
WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" at popular prices from Feb- 
ruary, 1945, on, we say that the public response to the Road- 
showing of this great Technicolor production is proof that the 
picture will establish new box-office records at popular prices. 



'FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" 

From the Celebrated Novel by Ernest Hemingway Starring 

Gary Cooper • Ingrid Bergman 

>r Sam WOod * B. G. DeSYLVA, E*ecut,ve Producer 

IN TECHNICOLOR 
AKIM TAMIROFF ■ ARTURO de CORDOVA 
JOSEPH CALLEIA • KATINA PAXINOU 
Screen Play by Dudley Nichols 



Produced and Directed by 



Never stop 'fill your over the top! 
Fighting Fifth War Loan ! 



ON THE MARCH Biddle Ex P ected 

To See Decree 
Draft This Week 



by RED KANN 



HOLLYWOOD 

IT will be interesting to maintain an eye on 
the future of Paramount. Thus far, it is 
much too soon to draw any conclusions 
.eading into pattrens of things to come. In 
fact, those in whose hands the policy destinies 
of the company rest cannot tell — yet. 
Here. are some of the factors: 
Aside from Cecil B. De Mille, who functions 
pretty much on his own but with full company 
financing, unit production is new at Para- 
mount. De Mille has his own setup, but is not 
the independent operator within the definition 
applying to Hal B. Wallis and Buddy De 
Sylva. 

If you acknowledge the De Mille arrange- 
ment as a unit, however, the only other sur- 
face departure in the current scheme is the 
Pine-Thomas Company, which makes "B" 
product. This enterprise produces off the Para- 
mount lot with Paramount funds. 

Wallis has a partnership arrangement and, 
as partners go, both he and Paramount have 
arranged financing accordingly. Y. Frank 
Freeman has stated that Wallis will not pro- 
ceed under the "favored nation" treatment 
upon which he drew at Warner where first call 
on properties and talent were part of his deal. 
The position is that Wallis will manage like 
any other independent producer and contract 
for required talent where he can find it. 

De Sylva, whose arrangement calls for six 
pictures deliverable in a maximum of three 
years — it can be done in less, of course — has a 
deal which generally resembles Wallis'. There 
is one essential difference, however. He is to 
get one personality out of the studio's talent 
pool for each of the six. 

What It Means 

NOW any such departure from long- 
standing operation brings new prob- 
lems in its wake. Inevitably, there 
will be real or fancied disaffection on the part 
of others. Or, if not disaffection, newly kindled 
ambition set afire by the precedent established. 

Anyone who has had close identification with 
production and studio management will bear 
witness to the very strong possibility all of 
this might spell trouble. 

It throws on the conference table the kind 
of situation which calls for the exercise of 
tact, persuasion and conviction. It makes it 
required to be certain those who enjoy part- 
nerships and units are kept happy and proper- 
ly productive under their new arrangement. In 
the case of Wallis, he is new to Paramount 
and Paramount is new to him. In the case of 
De Sylva, there is a new enterprise working 
collaboratively with an old studio association, 
yet subject to possible alteration because the 
surrounding conditions now are altered. 

Too, there is a large-scale problem deposited 
in the laps of management. It takes shape in 
the need for a plan, yet to be devised, for the 
approximate fourteen attractions to be produced 
this year under the aegis of the office up front; 
and there are succeeding years ahead. 

Come September 15 or thereabouts, De Syl- 
va will step down from his executive producer- 
ship. Someone or some thing has to replace 
him. It could be an executive board, function- 
ing along the general lines prevailing at MGM. 
It could be another executive producer, al- 
though as a non-betting man, we'd wager it 
won't be that. 



If a board, Freeman and Henry Ginsberg, 
of course, will be on it. This would add to 
management the specifics of production and 
throw added weight around shoulders already 
substantial with weight, already confronted 
with the delicate task of maintaining balance 
between the newly-created units and the old- 
line method of operation. 

The nubbin of all this reduces itself to one 
.over-all speculation, and speculation is the 
word for it: 

Whether or not the departure will prove the 
forerunner of a final, new order under which 
Paramount will continue as a producer, but as 
a producer in partnership with acknowledged, 
established picture-makers. 

If this company decides for the unit system 
complete, alliances in Hollywood may undergo 
shifts and the checkerboard of recognized pro- 
ducing talent moved about. It would make no 
difference in the total flow of production, but 
it could make a considerable difference in whose 
product the theatreman gets from what studio. 

Boiling Point 

fnr^HE Motion Picture Alliance was roast- 
I ed to a fine turn here at a mass meeting 
A attended by representatives of seventeen 
Hollywood guilds and unions. 

The organization attacked is the group which 
has let loose vague charges commented upon 
unfavorably and sharply in this printed area. 
Sponsors of the mass meeting advanced nine 
questions, got no answers because the MPA 
refused to send a representative to what it 
called a "smear soiree." Thereby, the Alliance 
demonstrated nothing and allowed its charges 
to stand. 

Its decision to remain away is an Alliance 
privilege, not now or ever to be denied. But 
its allegations, which are cloudy and unwar- 
ranted until and unless they are proven re- 
main for what they are : An attack on Holly- 
wood, and so an attack on the industry. 

Therefore, the smear originates with the Al- 
liance because a good name and a good reputa- 
tion are besmirched from within the industry 
itself. It ought to be apparent to its leaders 
that their thus far unsupported allegations 
about widespread impressions of Communists, 
radicals, crackpots and subversive content in 
motion pictures feed poison into the filmic 
body; that fair play dictates they ought to put 
up or shut up. 

If it is not apparent to them, action ought 
to be apparent to the producers. It is not 
enough for them to deplore this ideological fight 
which now divides much of Hollywood. They, 
the producers, are dragged into this. They 
are the keepers of the keys. They hold the ap- 
proaches and they guard the fortress. It is 
theirs to defend along with guilds and unions. 

The lies or the truths have to be told. In- 
action means indecision. Indecision leads to 
appeasement. 

The world knows about appeasement. 



Double Birthday Celebration 

Jack Goldstein, Twentieth Century-Fox's pub- 
licity manager, and Charles Schlaifer, advertising- 
manager, simultaneously celebrated their birthdays 
July 1 at Jack & Charlie's 21 Club, New York. 



Washington Bureau 

Consent decree negotiations between the dis- 
tributors and the Department of Justice are ex- 
pected shortly to enter their last lap, with the con- 
sideration by Attorney General Francis Biddle of 
the proposals for the decree which have developed 
during nine months of discussion and trading. 

With a flat statement understood to have been 
made by the companies when they submitted addi- 
tional proposals last month, that they had reached 
the limit to which they economically could go, De- 
partment officials are engaged in a final summing 
up to determine whether the offers made by the 
distributors represent more than could reasonably 
be expected to be gained by the long and costly 
machinery of litigation. 

Make New Concessions 

With the completion of this study, on which As- 
sistant Attorney General Tom C. Clark and Rob- 
ert L. Wright, special assistant in charge of the 
film unit, have been working for some days, the 
matter is expected to go to the Attorney General 
in the shape of a report and recommendation by 
Mr. Clark as to the acceptability of the offers. 

While in recent weeks little detail regarding the 
progress of the negotiations on specific points has 
been made available, it has been disclosed that the 
distributors have gone considerably further than 
projected in their original proposals last January. 

They have liberalized the cancellation terms, of- 
fered to straighten out the situation with respect 
to arbitration on specific run complaints and aban- 
doned their demand for the right to build "show 
case" houses, among the more important things, 
and are understood to have acceded to Department 
suggestions for modification of other points. 

Mr. Biddle was due to return to his desk this 
week, and it was expected that shortly thereafter 
the motion picture situation would be submitted to 
him for consideration. 

List Majors' Offers 

The major provisions of such a decree have been 
reported from time to time as follows : 

Arbitration : Maintenance of the present system 
of channeling all appeals to a single appellate 
board in New York, but extending arbitration of 
clearance to theatres owned or operated by the 
companies, providing arbitration of run to exhibi- 
tors in competition with the distributors' circuits, 
and providing machinery for making more effec- 
tive decisions on specific run complaints. • 

Cancellations : 20 per cent on pictures averaging 
not more than $100 each, 15 per cent on pictures 
averaging $101 to $250, and 10 per cent on pic- 
tures averaging $251 to $350. 

Theatres: All circuit expansions to be subject to 
Federal court approval before consummation, with 
no exception for "show cases." 

Pooling : All arrangements between signatories 
to the decree to be immediately terminated, 
whether relating to joint ownership or operation 
of theatres or joint buying arrangements, with all 
project franchises between signatory companies to 
be terminated immediately, and those held by 
others to be terminated immediately, if possible, 
otherwise at the end of existing contracts. 

Withholding of prints to give a prior playing 
date : prohibited. 

Forcing of shorts and newsreels : prohibited, 
with distributors to pay fines of $250 for the first 
offense and $500 for subsequent offenses where 
arbitration decisions find violations to have oc- 
curred, the fines to go to the offended exhibitor. 

Trade shows : All pictures to be trade shown, 
but no changes required in selling methods. 

Cancellation for cause : Exhibitors to be given 
five days after notice of availability to cancel on 
moral, religious or racial grounds. 



Sues Warners for $25,000 

John Fitzgerald, publicist, in a suit filed in New 
York Federal Court against Warner Bros, last 
week asks $25,000 claimed due him for overtime. 



"White Cliffs" Sets New High 

"The White Cliffs of Dover" in seven weeks at 
the Music Hall, grossed approximately $50,000i 
more than any previous picture which played the! 
theatre for the same length of time. 



22 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



picture in years 
from the company 
with plenty 




1 i x;„„ 




SO MANY STARS! SO MUCH ENTERTAINMENT! 
THE MOST NOVEL BOX-OFFICE WALLOP IN YEARS! 



The nation's No. 1 pin up girl with the 
classy chassis and gams what ams! 




CENTURY-FOX 



NEVER STOP TILL YOU'RE OVER THE 
TOP! FIGHTING FIFTH WAR LOAN! 







THE MOST IMPORTANT EVENT IN 50 
YEARS OF MOTION PICTURE ENTERTAINMENT! 

DARRYL F. ZANUCK'S w w _ tj _ ^ 

Directed by HENRY KING Written for the Screen by Lamar Trotti <CC,V^ 



MOTION PIC Tf TR V HFRAin IT 71 V 



BOND DRIVE PLUNGES AHEAD 
IN FINAL CAMPAIGN WEEK 



fitly 4th Events, Plus Free 
Movie Day, Give Impetus 
to Finishing Spurt 

!j As the Fifth War Loan went into its fourth 
ind final week activities along the industry's 
-.mire campaign front pushed forward, with the 

iiation's annual bow to its day of Independence 
nd Free Movie Day, sending Bond sales soar- 

sWg- 

More than half the nation's theatres — 8,573 
n -all — admitted Bond buyers free on July 6, 
iding immeasurably in the lagging sale of "E" 
Sends. In the Fourth War Loan 3,403 the- 
tres participated in Free Movie Day. Thou- 
sands of exhibitors throughout the country 
.eld special events on the Fourth or joined in 
- ivic rallies and ceremonies, and on Wednes- 
lav throughout radio's networks, theatregoers 
America were bombarded with advance 
■ublicity of the Free Movie Day following. 

Late last week Robert J. O'Donnell, heading 
,he industry's contribution to the national cam- 
>aign, announced that the first metropolitan city 
o go over the top was Dallas. Upon receiving 
■he report by wire from James O. Cherry, 
Dallas exhibitor chairman, Mr. O'Donnell said, 
'quoting the telegram : 

Dallas First In Metropolitan 
Areas To Break Quota 

"Dallas 'went two million dollars over its 
juota of $74,000,000, with 12 days to go' in the 
Irive." Three downtown Bond premieres fol- 
owed the announcement adding $2,950,000 to 
he grand total. 

One of the first states to go over the top was 
^hio at last weekend with a $808,552,497 total 
'bid sales to individuals 53 per cent of the 
iitate's quota. 

' The special Fourth of July events from coast 

0 coast kept showmen busy and the public buy- 
ng. In Buffalo theatres promoted the events 
)f the day with the theme : '"Fight by His Side 
—There'll be Another Independence Day." 
The theatres collaborated with civic ceremonies, 
Holding impromptu rallies in many houses. On 

uly 3 five downtown theatres presented a pair 
>f guest tickets for the July 4 programs to each 
purchaser of a Bond. 

' In Pittsburgh the theatres celebrated Inde- 
' Impendence Day with special stage rallies, and 

1 oined in public rallies in parks and city squares, 
eceiving the cooperation of daily newspapers. 

In a number of theatres in southern New 
'ersey Bond Premieres aided in Fourth of July 
Ceremonies. In Phoenix, Ariz., the theatres 
' oined in sponsoring a huge street dance and 
3ond and Stamp auction along with the cus- 
iomary fireworks in a city park, with Bonds 
is admission. Throughout Arizona theatres held 
Ipecial rallies, auctions and Bond picnics. 

v ree Movie Day Gets Big 
°lay in Arizona 

j In North Dakota July Fourth signalled the 
(jpening of a barrage of publicity for Free 
\Iovie Day Thursday. Ninety-five of the state's 

70 theatres participated in Free Movie Day. 

.nd they received the support of the state's eight 

adio stations, all the newspapers, patriotic, 

raternal and civic groups. 

■ In Milwaukee the downtown theatres held 
pecial Bond programs featuring war veterans 
nd color guards, lobby Bond booths remaining 



JULY BOND SALES COUNT; 
REPORTS DUE JULY 27 

Robert J. O'Donnell, industry national 
chairman for the Fifth War Loan drive, 
and Claude Lee, the industry's con- 
sultant to the U. S. Treasury, announced 
in a joint statement at midweek that 
the Treasury had decided to utilize the 
impetus given the campaign, and asked 
the Industry to continue its bond selling 
efforts till July 27. Final report forms 
will be sent to exhibitors about July 20 
and exhibitors were asked to return them 
with record of sale through July 27. 
The drive was to close July 8. 



open throughout the day. Theatres elsewhere 
in Wisconsin held morning Bond premieres, 
many of them in connection with American Le- 
gion and civic programs. 

In Wichita, Kans., where the first of the B- 
29's were built, a "B-29 Day" was combined 
with the Independence Day ceremonies, all the 
theatres presenting a B-29 souvenir to all Bond 
buyers. The souvenir was a medal stamped 
from scrap metal left over from the manufac- 
ture of the giant planes that poured destruction 
upon Tokyo. 

The hub around which whirled Independence 
Day activities in New Mexico was the "Gov- 
ernor for a Day" contest originated by Ted 
Jones, state manager for Griffith Theatres. The 
youngsters are contesting for the honor of sit- 
ting in the Governor's chair for a day and a 
$500 Bond award, and every contestant who 
sold a Bond on July Fourth received a pass to 
a Griffith or Albuquerque theatre, located in 
14 towns. 

Promoted Merchandise 
Auctioned in Missouri 

In eastern Missouri theatres held Bond ral- 
lies, featuring auctions of promoted merchan- 
dise. In all the theatres the rallies followed 
war newsreels. 

In Louisiana this last week of the drive was 
given a closing impetus with some 100 pre- 
mieres and special Fourth of July sales pro- 
motion. 

Theatres in North and South Carolina gave 
special attention to lobbies with special patriotic 
decorations and put special emphasis on the 
Honor Roll of local employees, with Bond 
booths manned by Victory Volunteers in uni- 
form or patriotic attire. The theatres exhibited 
a special Fourth of July trailer. In the larger 
theatres there were stage rallies with war 
veterans and war mothers making appearances. 

In Iowa theatres played up their role as issu- 
ing agents while other issuing agents closed 
for the holiday. A. H. Blank, state chairman, 
announced indications point towards the the- 
atres of the state going over a $9,000,000 goal. 
A premiere at the Des Moines theatre in 
Des Moines landed a total of $3,154,250 in 
sales of Bonds. 

In Oregon all theatres gave special attention 
to July Fourth. In Portland 27,000 Bond buy- 
ers viewed a show featuring Hollywood and 
radio stars. 

Throughout Maine a number of theatres held 
premieres and special children's premieres in 



the morning. Special events were blended with 
the activities of veterans' and patriotic groups. 

In the Kansas City area several premieres 
were held on July Fourth, some of the towns 
holding their second or third premiere. Two 
major premieres were held in conjunction with 
Free Movie Day Thursday in Kansas City. 
During the Fourth War Loan the area held 
170 premieres. Close to 400 premieres were 
the product of this, the current drive. 

Several District of Columbia 
Theatres Exceed Quotas 

A drive urging children to become Junior 
Treasury Agents was climaxed Monday in Kan- 
sas City's Municipal Auditorium when 20,000 
persons who had boughts Bonds of children 
viewed a stage show featuring Sergeant Gene 
Autry, military bands, vaudeville acts and war 
veterans, many of them wearers of the Purple 
Heart. 

The theatres of Denver sponsored an open 
house and tour for Bond buyers at Lowry Field, 
Army training school. More than 20,000 Bond 
holders swarmed through the post. Scores of 
theatres throughout Colorado held premieres on 
the Fourth, and in Colorado Springs sponsored 
a rally around captured German equipment. 

Rhode Island theatres ran trailers advising 
the public of the plans of the Victory Volun- 
teers who made a state-wide Bond selling can- 
vas during the holiday week. 

The theatres of Illinois, as those in Iowa, 
reminded patrons that on the Fourth they were 
ready to serve as the only active issuing agents. 

Throughout the state of Montana theatres 
held premieres and "Kiddie War Bond Shows" 
and auctions on Independence Day. They also 
cooperated with a number of special Bond ro- 
deos and other celebrations. 

In Rutland, Vt., the Fourth of July saw the 
opening of a four-day Bond-selling carnival di- 
rected by Frank Venett, exhibitor chairman for 
Vermont. There were numerous special stunts 
all the remaining days of this week, including 
the selection of a Bond Queen. 

In Washington, D. C., an as yet unofficial 
total of some $1,000,000 in Bonds went into the 
fighting of the war as result of "Washington's 
Cavalcade of Freedom," held on Independence 
Day and the Monument Grounds, with pyrotch- 
nics and Hollywood stars featured. Admission 
to the proceedings was through the purchase of 
a Bond at a local theatre. 

Special Drive For Junior 
Treasury Agents 

A number of theatres in the District of Col- 
umbia area had gone over their quotas before 
the end of last week. George Shepp, manager 
of the Hyattsville theatre in Hyattsville, had re- 
ported sales indicated a figure of 150 per cent 
of the original goal. Other theatres bursting 
their quotas were the Marlboro theatre, man- 
aged by Bert Herman, and the Cameo theatre, 
managed by Si Hawverale. Edward Purcell, 
manager of Warner's Strand theatre in Staun- 
ton, Va., was the first Warner manager in the 
area to top his quota. 

At the Alabama theatre in Birmingham, man- 
aged by Francis Falkenburg, a capacity audi- 
ence at a premiere last week bought $1,150,000 
in Bonds. 

Fourteen simultaneous premieres in Dela- 
ware brought a total sale of some $1,750,000, 
with the Warner theatre in Wilmington head- 
ing the list. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



Stock Value Rises $78,512,888 
In Summer Bull Market 



Motion picture shares, participating actively 
in an early summer bull market on the stock 
exchange, increased $78,512,888 in market 
value during the first six months of 1944. 

Spurred by the Allied invasion of France 
and mounting United Nations' offensives on 
all battlefronts of the war, Wall Street traders 
bid briskly for stocks of companies with the 
greatest peacetime potentialities. 

Among these, motion picture stocks were 
rated high, and gains ranging from one to 
nine points over their final 1943 prices were 
recorded by film shares on the Big Board. 
Corresponding advances were made by pic- 
ture industry securities on the Curb. 

Accompanied by sharply accelerated trad- 
ing, the listed value of film shares on 
the New York Stock Exchange rose to 
$829,048,134, compared with $750,535,246 
at the end of 1943. Many issues touched 
their highest levels since 1937. 

Among active film stocks, biggest gains 
for the half-year were shown by Columbia 
Pictures, up 5!/ 8 ; Loew's, up 9; Paramount, 
up 4%; Twentieth Century-Fox, up 3%, and 
Warner Brothers, up 2. Technicolor featured 



film stock trading on the Curb market, wi!| 
a rise of more than 7 points to above 1 I 
its best price in several years. 

In addition to the influence of a genera 
rising stock market, interest in several of tl'l 
picture shares was heightened by favorab 
news developments, such as the declarati< 
by Loew's, Inc., of an extra dividend I 
50 cents a share on the common stock, 
addition to the regular quarterly payment i 
50 cents a share, payable to stockholders 1 
record June 16. 

Prospects of a continued favorable ear 
ings trend for Paramount Pictures brougli 
good demand for that stock. Barney Balaba 
president, reported that earnings for tr 
company's second quarter were expected in 
exceed the corresponding period of 194 
despite higher tax payments. 

Twentieth Century-Fox Film reported nr 
income of $3,186,303 for the 13 weeks ende 
March 25, 1944, compared with $2,672,77 
for the 13 weeks ended March 27, 194! 
Earnings for the 1944 period were equal t 
$1.57 a common share, against $1.34 a shar 
in 1943. 



Commons Urges 
MOI Continue for 
Value Abroad 

Members of the House of Commons in Lon- 
don last Thursday, during a debate covering the 
entire field of film activities of the British Min- 
istry of Information, urged a summary cessation 
of the MOI's home film program as soon as the 
war ends, but agreed that "some form of post- 
war national interpretation abroad is necessary." 
The House praised the MOI documentaries and 
expressed the hope that they would continue. 

Brendan Bracken, director of the Ministry, dis- 
closed during the debate that the MOI's film divi- 
sion was fully equipped and ready to rush British 
pictures into every liberated country, presumably 
in competition with American films shown under 
the sponsorship of the Office of War Information 
and the Army Psychological Warfare Bureau. _ 

It is understood that four top-budget British 
features have been dubbed into French and Italian 
and at least 15 others have been prepared with 
superimposed titles, many of the latter group al- 
ready exhibited in North Africa and Italy and 
awaiting release in France. 

Meanwhile, in New York, Robert Riskin, direc- 
tor of the overseas film division of OWI, dis- 
closed that the presidents of the - major companies 
had promised to make available to the OWl at 
least two pictures from each company dubbed in 
French and Italian. Home office foreign managers, 
he said, were working out the details of the agree- 
ment and deciding on titles. Mr. Riskin said the 
OWI was assured of at least 16 pictures from 
all the companies, and that he was confident the 
industry would render every assistance to the OWI, 
despite any reports to the contrary. 

Emphasizing that the MOI's activities were in 
no way competitive with the British industry, Mr. 
Bracken told the House of Commons that MOI 
instigated commercial production of four full- 
length films and extended help in the production 
of 38 others during the past year. 

He said that Crown Film Unit, MOI's important 
producing unit, had played an essential part 
throughout the war in the development of a rec- 
ognized national British film style. He reported 
that MOI film units produced 160 pictures for 
English-speaking audiences. Mr. Bracken further 
declared that the "public response" to these films 
"belies the dreary designation of documentaries." 

During the past year, 96 pictures were repro- 
duced in 348 foreign language versions, aggregat- 
ing 50,000,000 feet. The small Colonial Film Unit 
made 28 one-reelers and 20 new films, "forming 
the genesis of an invaluable post-war Empire ser- 
vice," the MOI head added. 

Summer Holdover Record Set 
By Three RKO Features 

Three RKO Radio pictures, currently playing 
first and subsequent runs throughout the country, 
have set a new company record for summer hold- 
overs. The pictures are "Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs," "Up in Arms," and "Show Busi- 
ness," according to the company. 



Set "Skeffington" Release 

Ben Kalmenson, general sales manager for 
Warner Bros, has set August 12 as the national 
release date of "Mr. Skeffington," final picture on 
Warners' 1943-44 distribution schedules. The film 
is currently in the sixth week of an extended pre- 
release run at the Hollywood theatre. New York. 



Ban Children in Epidemic 

The Mecklenburg County Board of Health last 
week ordered closed to children under 15 all pub- 
lic gathering places because of an epidemic sweep- 
ing western and central North Carolina. 



Revel Is Producer 

Harry Revel is associate producer of "Minstrel 
Man," PRC musical starring Benny Fields. 



Chicago Papers Cut 
Ad Lineage for Theatres 

The Chicago Times has announced a new ad- 
vertising lineage maximum for motion picture 
theatres, limiting Loop theatres to 50 lines per 
day, and outlying theatres to five lines daily and 
10 lines on Sunday. The Tribune at the same time 
has announced a new reduced maximum of eight 
lines per day for outlying houses. 

RCA to Expand Its 
Distribution Abroad 

In line with its announced policy of expanded 
theatre equipment service in the domestic field, 
RCA Victor Division of Radio Corporation of 
America, announced this week that a complete line 
of motion picture equipment also would be made 
available through RCA to exhibitors in countries 
outside the United States. 



Cowan Budget on Four Films 
Set at $4,750,000 

A budget of $4,750,000 has been announced by 
Lester Cowan for his four pictures for United 
Artists. The films are "Tomorrow the World," 
now in production; "G.I. Joe," and two untitled 
productions, one to star Greta Garbo, and the 
other a musical. 



Finish Shooting Spanish Film 

Dudley Murphy has finished shooting "The Bell 
of My Village," the first of four Spanish films he 
is producing at the Azteca studio in Mexico City 
for United Artists distribution in Latin-America 
and Spain. The film is based on a Saturday Eve- 
ning Post story by Budd Schulberg. 



Elect Lack RMA Director 

At the twentieth annual meeting of the Radio 
Manufacturing Association held recently in Chi- 
cago, Frederick R. Lack, vice-president "and man- 
ager of the radio division of the Western Electric 
Company, was elected a director for a two-year 
term. He recently served as director of the Army- 
Navy Electronics Production Agency in Wash- 
ington. 



Relief Fund Aided 
6,168 During 1943 

Hollywood Bureau 

Due to increased employment by studios anc 
war plants under the urgency of war, Hollywood' 
Motion Picture Relief Fund was called upon t< 
extend aid in but 6,168 cases during 1943, a dro] 
of 1,254 from the 7,422 of 1942, according to th. 
annual report submitted by Wilma Bashor, execu 
tive secretary, at the organization's annual meetin; 
last week. Cases dealt with involved ministratioi 
benefiting 10,338 individuals. On the other hand 
the average expenditude per case rose from $255.96 
the 1942 figure, to $290. 

The financial statement submitted by George Bag 
nail, fund treasurer, showed net assets of $1,581, 
281.47 at the close of the year, an increase of $229, 
700.87 over the 1942 levels. The assets includec 
$1,025,681.82 invested in U. S. Treasury bonds 
$471,819.34 invested in the Fund Country House 
the institution's permanent home for aged and ill 
and $80,372.34 cash on hand. 

The Motion Picture Relief Fund derives suppor 
principally from allocations of one-half of one pei 
cent of earnings by professionals in production. Th< 
number of these pledging that share of their in- 
comes rose 3,266 to 10,641 during 1943. 

Income from the Screen Guild Players radic 
program sponsored by Lady Esther, Ltd., devotee 
exclusively to upkeep and expansion of the Coun- 
try House, amounted to $209,427.28, net. 

The Fund share in the proceeds of Sol Lesser's 
"Stage Door Canteen" had amounted to $209,427.2? 
at the close of the period, with expectation thai 
about $50,000 more would be realized. The Func 
had received $34,164.38 from the Community Chesi 
and $2,450 from the Theatre Authority. 

All the incumbent officers were reelected at the 
meeting. Jean Hersholt is president ; Ralph Mor- 
gan, Lucille Gleason. Walter F. Wanger and Irv- 
ing Pichel are the vice-presidents : Mr. Bagnall 
secretary and treasurer ; and Ewell D. Moore is 
counsel. 

Arthur Ripley, William Pereira, William Scul- 
ly, Lucille Browne and E. J. Mannix were added 
to the board of trustees. 



28 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



HOLLYWOOD GUILDS DENOUNCE 
ALLIANCE, CREATE COUNCIL 



jabor-Management Rule Is 
; Forecast for Hollywood at 
c: Coast Meeting 

: \o\lywood Bureau 

Representatives of 17 Hollywood guilds and 

lions, officially claiming to represent about 50 
: -r cent of the production colony's 30,000 

orkers, met in a mass meeting at the Holly- 
:• ood Women's Club June 28 and unanimously 
.: issed one resolution which denounced the Mo- 
•>.on Picture Alliance for the Preservation of 
(U. merican Ideals and another which created 
, . .e Council of Hollywood Guilds and Unions. 
'■, One speaker forecast Labor-Management 

Iministrations for Hollywood. 

The Council, a development out of the 
E mergency Committee of Hollywood Guilds 
!;; id Unions which called the meeting, will as- 
r "ime form and function for two years when the 
Hp guilds and unions which are parties to the 
•• an formally ratify the proposal. Prompt rati- 
j.. ration is expected. 

'nifs Program Outlined 
~n Eight-Point Agenda 

The program to be pursued was outlined in 

41 eight-point agenda, similarly adopted by 
nanimous action, and is this : 
"1. To combat all groups or individuals 
tfeeking to disseminate anti-labor doctrines or 
liropaganda encouraging racial discrimination 
r religious intolerance, during and after the 
rar. 

"2. To bring about the cooperation of all 
j lose of similar views in the industry in op- 
posing all groups or individuals who attack the 
Pkotion picture business from within or without. 
' '3. To protect in every manner possible the 
eedom of the screen from such self-appointed 
msors as the Motion Picture Alliance for the 
reservation of American Ideals. 
"4. To develop a program of public rela- 
'ons to inform the public generally of the im- 
ortance to the whole United States of main- 
lining free expression on the screen, with 
roper safeguards for the public welfare, 
y "5. To prepare a plan, in cooperation with 
le Motion Picture Producers' Association, for 
,?-absorbing motion picture workers now in 
ne armed forces into the industry after the 
•ar is over, no matter how far distant that 
: iay seem at this time. 

! "6. To study how Hollywood's contribution 
) the successful prosecution of the war to a 
jmpletely victorious conclusion may be in- 
"eased and made more effective and to put 
lto effect all possible measures to that end. 

"7. To make periodical reports to the 
'uilds and unions, which it represents, and 
hose authority and autonomy shall be in no 
ay infringed upon or lessened by their agree- 
lent to work together in this manner for their 
mtual benefit. 

''8. To invite other guilds and unions in 
le industry to join the Council of Hollywood 
niilds and Unions for the above purposes." 

Resolution Terms Alliance 
Subversive and Dangerous" 

Concentration of the meeting's fire was 
urled in the direction of the Motion Picture 
Jliance, which had rejected an invitation to 
?nd an accredited representative to answer 



nine questions based on published statements 
and public utterances of MPA officials. By 
resolution, the Alliance was described as a "sub- 
versive and dangerous organization which com- 
forts the enemy." It was denounced for "mas- 
querading as a non-partisan, patriotic organi- 
zation, opposed to both Fascism and Commun- 
ism" when, the charge read, it is "in fact a 
violently partisan, political group under the 
leadership of notorious anti-labor union wreck- 
ers with clear Fascistic tendencies." 

By its statement published earlier that there 
is a "widespread impression that this industry 
is made up of and dominated by Communists, 
radicals and crackpots," the MPA was accused 
of having libeled the industry and with con- 
sciously having promoted disunity and discord 
within the industry during time of war. 

Garrett Quotes MPA 
Speaker, Gives Report 

In a lengthy report, Oliver H. P. Garrett 
drew from speeches allegedly delivered by 
Howard Emmett Rogers and Mrs. Lela Rogers 
before the Americanism Defense League and 
an organization known as Pro-America by way 
of seeking to establish the conclusions that the 
MPA is "anti" on these counts : labor, unity, 
Jews and Negroes. Mr. Rogers, a writer at 
MGM, is a member of the executive board of 
MPA, as is Mrs. Rogers, mother of Ginger 
Rogers, and on the executive staff at RKO. 
Bearing the identical name, they are not re- 
lated. 

Mr. Garrett quoted each one variously 
throughout his report, cited quotations of 
Bundists and others now on trial for sedition 
in Washington, laid emphasis on his statement 
that he had been unable to find any spoken 
reference in opposition to Fascism on the part 
of Alliance spokesmen. 

Under the chairmanship of Emmett Lavery, 
Mary C. McCall, Jr., president of the Screen 
Writers Guild, was the first speaker. She re- 
viewed the series of outside attacks, leveled at 
the industry in the last few years, and modern- 
ized her account with the Alliance. Citing 
public acknowledgments of the industry's war 
record, Miss McCall declared, "We've got to 
win as much attention for the truths as has been 
given the smears. We're late in telling the 
truth about ourselves, late in meeting in unity 
to plan the most effective way of telling it. But 
.we have met. We are united. We know the 
story, and it's a proud story. Let's spread it on 
the record." 

Wanger Defends Industry 
Against Attacks 

Walter Wanger, speaking as an individual, 
accused the Alliance leadership of bad faith. 
"Surely men of the prestige of the Alliance 
leaders know that if their charges against Hol- 
lywood were founded on fact, they could have 
—and should have — taken those charges to the 
responsible groups charged with directing in- 
dustry policy and picture content. They could 
have gone, for instance, to the producers' as- 
sociation. Instead, they went to the press," he 
said. 

"Anyone who carefully and deliberately seeks 
for something to criticize in motion pictures 
can undoubtedly find it. The subject matter 
necessarily used in making a motion picture is 
so great that if one chooses to look for a word 
here, a phrase there or a title somewhere else. 



they can undoubtedly twist and turn such mat- 
ters to indicate some evil. In order to do so, 
however, those who seek evil, see evil." 

Sidney Buchman, executive producer at Co- 
lumbia, envisioned a labor-management rela- 
tionship in Hollywood. "Both groups are seek- 
ing common ground," he stated. "The well-be- 
ing of this industry — its economic and moral 
health — is the whole point, in order to assure 
the same state of things for the world. Each 
group has its talents and experiences to bring 
to this objective." 

Alliance Is Disavowed by 
Labor Representatives 

James Hilton, author and officer of the SWG 
and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences, said, in part: "To the best of my 
knowledge, nobody in England has the slightest 
complaint about subversive tendencies in Hol- 
lywood films. I don't think they've even no- 
ticed any." 

Disavowal of the Alliance was officially re- 
corded on behalf of labor by Al Speede, busi- 
ness manager, Studio Electricians, Sound and 
Broadcasting Technicians, Local 40, I.B.E.W.. ; 
Herb Aller, business representative, Interna- 
tional Photographers of the Motion Picture In- 
dustry, Local 659, IATSE; and Herbert K. 
Sorrell, president of the Conference of Studio 
Unions and business agent for the Motion Pic- 
ture Painters, Local 644, AFL. 

Among resolutions adopted was one pledg- 
ing loyalty to the President as commander-in- 
chief, and another to send a full transcript of 
Wednesday night's proceedings to unions and 
other interested groups throughout the nation 
and to newspapers. Mr. Lavery said 50,000 
copies would be required. 

Most Hollywood U nions 
Were Represented 

By voice vote, these organizations had dele- 
gations present : 

Film Technicians of the Motion Picture In- 
dustry, Local 683, IATSE; International As- 
sociation of Machinists, Local 1185; Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; In- 
ternational Union of Building Service Em- 
ployes, Local 99; International Photographers 
of the Motion Picture Industries, Local 659, 
IATSE; Conference of Studio Unions, Motion 
Picture Painters, Local 644; Radio Writers 
Guild, Screen Cartoonists, Local 852; Screen 
Office Employes Guild, Screen Publicists 
Guild, Screen Story Analysts Guild, Screen 
Writers Guild ; Society of Motion Picture 
Film Editors, Songwriters Protective Associa- 
tion, Special Officers and Guards, Local 193, 
and United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, Local 946. 

Los Angeles newspaper coverage was 
meager. The Times buried the story in four 
inches on an inside page. The Examiner fol- 
lowed an identical procedure. The Herald- 
Express, evening Hearst paper, bypassed the 
meeting completely. The Daily News, only 
tabloid here, devoted 12 inches of type, and 
the Hollywood Citizen-News used 10 inches. 



Acquires Spokane House 

Joseph Rosenfield, theatre executive in Spokane 
Wash., and for some years past with Sterling 
Theatres, has acquired the Post Street theatre in 
Spokane, and also is a partner with James Ewing 
in the Auburn theatre at Auburn, Wash. 



10TION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



29 



Deny Mexican Actors 
Oppose Dubbing 



Greetings to Lieut. Jof 
Negrete, secretary of t'j 
Mexican Screen Acto 
Guild, are extended at ti 
Los Angeles Pan-Americ 1 
Terminal by Francis Alstoc 
left, and Frank Fouce, of t 
Office of the CIA/ 



Negrete, Actor Guild Head, 
in Hollywood Seeking 
Reciprocal Agreement 

Hollywood Bureau 

In Hollywood last week as spokesman for 
the Mexican industry and with a dual mission 
to perform, Lieutenant Jorge Negrete, presi- 
dent of the Mexican Actors Guild, held a press 
conference Tuesday to deny printed reports of 
Mexican opposition to Hollywood procedure 
in the dubbing of pictures and met with a com- 
mittee of the Screen Actors Guild Thursday 
night to enlist that organization's aid in com- 
pelling Mexican actors to fulfill Mexican com- 
mitments. 

The printed reports denied officially by Mr. 
Negrete had asserted that the Mexican indus- 
try was antagonistic toward the practice of 
bringing Mexican players to Hollywood to 
make Spanish-language sound tracks for Amer- 
ican films. Mr. Negrete had categorically de- 
nied this in a letter addressed to the Office of 
the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, and 
when he had given the press his assurances 
in person and with explanations the Los An- 
geles newspapers printed stories in correction 
of the reports. 

Practice Not Considered Harmful 

In written denial of the reports printed in 
Los Angeles publications, Mr. Negrete said: 
"In behalf of the Mexican Actors Guild, I 
consider it an obligation to clearly inform you 
of the true facts concerning this problem. No 
member of the Mexican Actors Guild feels 
the slightest antipathy toward the dubbing of 
U. S. films in the Spanish language in Holly- 
wood. We do not consider this practice to be 
harmful to the Mexican industry. 

"It is definitely not true that the MAG or 
any other organization in the Mexican industry 
has adopted, or has any intention of adopting, 
measures or restrictions against the dubbing 
system. Further, there is no intention to estab- 
lish sanctions to penalize members of the Mex- 
ican industry who may desire to come to the 
United States and engage in such work. 

"I have come to Hollywood for the express 
purpose of clarifying this situation and to dis- 
cuss with the Hollywood Screen Actors Guild 
the possibilities of a reciprocal agreement 
which would benefit members of both organiza- 
tions and at the same time help the continued 
progress of the film industries of both our 
countries. In my opinion the motion picture 
is the surest medium by which the people of 
our two countries can become better known to 
each other and thereby form the basis of a real 
friendship." 

Expressed Appreciation for Aid 

Mr. Negete said he had not been able to 
ascertain the source of the reports that had 
been printed, to the distress of his and associ- 
ated organizations in Mexico, but that he hoped 
to find out who had started the story and take 
steps to see that a stop, was put to the circula- 
tion of unfounded assertions which he regard- 
ed as prejudicial to cooperation between the 
United States and Mexico in motion picture 
matters. He was voluble in expression of ap- 
preciation for aid, in materials and otherwise, 
received under arrangements worked out bv the 




Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs, at whose Hollywood headquarters his 
press conference was held. 

The reciprocal agreement with the SAG 
sought by the MAG was not associated directly 
with the matter of dubbing, in Mr. Negrete's 
discourse, but the topics overlapped in conver- 
sation as well as in essence. If approved by 
the SAG and finalized in the form submitted 
by the MAG president to James Cagney, presi- 
dent of the SAG Thursday night, the agree- 
ment would make it incumbent on the SAG 
to withhold issuance of Hollywood working 
permission from Mexican players save for pe- 
riods of time during which the players were 
known to be without commitment to Mexican 
producers. It would be required of a Mexican 
player applying to the SAG for permission to 
work in Hollywood that he reveal to the SAG 
his commitments in Mexico and the dates. 

Contracts Unlike Hollywood's 

Explanation of the need for this, Mr. Ne- 
grete said, is the plain and neither contested 
nor regretted fact that all Mexican players 
aspire to a Hollywood career and that it is not 
uncommon for one of them, brought here to 
work in a film personally or on dubbing as- 
signment, to remain here as long as possible, in 
hopes of gaining permanency, in disregard of 
contracts to appear in stipulated Mexican pic- 
tures-scheduled for start of shooting at speci- 
fied dates. 

In elaboration of this explanation, Mr. Ne- 
grete said that contracts of employment in the 
Mexican industry did not parallel those pre- 
vailing in Hollywood, due in large part to the 
shortage of talent and the consequent position 
of choice enjoyed by ranking players. There 
are virtually no term contracts, he said, com- 
mitments being made, instead, for certain roles 
in certain pictures, the commitment made in ad- 
vance of preparation of the picture, which is 
then shaped to the talent available in such 
manner that substitution becomes impracticable. 
For reasons stemming from this state of af- 
fairs, he said, talent agencies are not required 
in the Mexican industry, since every player of 
consequence is in demand. 

Of other battling there was plenty, though, 
before the formation two months ago of the 
Mexican Actors Guild, its president told his 



interviewers. Until then, he said, the actor 
had been controlled and represented by th 
technicians under a management which exactei 
dues but yielded the players no benefits. Whei 
the spit came, making something of a furo 
for a while, the MAG emerged with 1 ,20' 
members. 

Seek Relief of Talent Shortage 

A chief objective of the MAG, Mr. Negrete 
said, is the relief of the talent shortage which 
indirectly gives rise to the need for the SAG- 
MAG agreement sought. A first step towarc 
the easement of the shortage is to be taken ir 
October or November of this year, he said 
when the MAG will open an academy of dra- 
matic instruction with a class of 100. This wili 
be operated directly by the MAG, although tht 
Mexican Ministry of Public Instruction, whicl 
sponsors the long established but unrelatec 
Mexican Academy of Motion Picture Arts anc 
Sciences, will participate in the undertaking. 

Active membership in the MAG was not tc 
be had at a single bound, Mr. Negrete pointet 
out in response to questioning, although ad- 
ministrative membership, as it is called, accrue; 
automatically to anyone who acts in a picture 
and who pays, also automatically, five per cenl 
of his earnings into the Guild treasury. There 
are 2,100 administrative members at the mo- 
ment, he said. 

Membership of Two Kinds 

The difference between active and adminis- 
trative members — both kinds pay five per cenl 
of earnings as dues, although the active mem- 
bers contribute additionally as much as 
per cent of their salaries — is based on experi- 
ence and importance. To become an active 
member, a player must have played a role oi 
third importance, or better, in at least six fea- 
ture pictures. This takes some time, also some 
ability, and eliminates the transients, the crash- 
ers and the specially-favored. 
^ The Thursday night conference with Mr 
Cagney, who was accompanied by a committee 
representing the SAG board of directors, ended 
in an understanding that both organizations 
would explore further the subject under dis- 
cussion and see what kind of an arrangemenl 
might be worked out for ultimate submission tc 
the respective directorates. 



30 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 




your heart 




0 es with hi 




. . . laughing, loving, deeply 
sympathizing... as you follow the 
most human character ever to 
come out of a best-selling novel 
. . . into a great escapist comedy ! 






Screen Play by Waldo Salt, George Corey, Louis Solomon 
From the best-selling novel by THEODORE PRATT 
Produced by JACK MOSS • Directed by ALFRED E. GREEN 



THE HOLLYWOOD SCENE 



ompleted 

GM 

ational Velvet 
- Z 

luebeard 

]K0 RADIO 

ne Master Race 
fhe Princess and the 
Pirate (Goldwyn) 

EPUBLIC 

[y Buddy 

DTH CENTURY- FOX 

-aura 

■ omething tor the Boys 

NITED ARTISTS 
Ifcuest in the House 
I (Stromberg) 



Started 

COLUMBIA 

Sergeant Mike 
The Unknown 

RKO RADIO 

The Brighton Strangler 

REPUBLIC 

Firebrands of Arizona 

UNITED ARTISTS 

The Great John L 
(Crosby) 

Shooting 

COLUMBIA 

Texas Rifles 
Stalk the Hunter 



Tonight and Every 
Night 

MGM 

The Home Front 
Anchors Aweigh 
Airship Squadron 4 
Music for Millions 
Son of Lassie 
The Thin Man Goes 

Home 
Ziegfeld Follies 
The Picture of Dorian 

Gray 

Thirty Seconds Over 
Tokyo 

MONOGRAM 

The Utah Kid 
Baby Shoes 



PRC 

When the Lights Go 
On Again 

PARAMOUNT 

Kitty 

Out of This World 
Double Expose 

( Pine-Thomas) 
A Medal for Benny 
Her Heart in Her 

Throat 
Here Come the Waves 
Murder, He Says 
Two Years Before the 

Mast 

RKO RADIO 

The Girl Rush 
My Pal. Wolf 
Farewell, My Lovely 



Having Wonderful 
Crime 

REPUBLIC 

Man of Mystery 
Brazil 

Atlantic City 

20TH CENTURY-FOX 

Thunderhead 

A Tree Grows in 

Brooklyn 
Winged Victory 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Tomorrow the World 

(Cowan) 
Dark Waters 

(Bogeaus) 
Story of G. I. Joe 

( Cowan ) 



Three's a Family 
(Lesser) 

UNIVERSAL 

The Frozen Ghost 
The Old Texas Trail 
Can't Help Singing 
My Baby Loves Music 
Queen of the Nile 
In Society 

Bowery to Broadway 

WARNERS 

The Corn Is Green 
Christmas in 

Connecticut 
Strangers in Our Midst 
Roughly Speaking 
Objective, Burma 
Hollywood Canteen 



PRODUCTION SLACKENS OFF; 
'GREAT JOHN L" STARTS 



iollyivood Bureau 

Production slackened off last week, as eight 
matures were completed, and work started on 
ve. The total number of pictures before the 
ameras was 55, as compared to a top of 58 the 
revious week. 

The most interesting new venture of the week 
.as "The Great John L," which Bing Crosby 
; producing for United Artists release. It's 
he story of the life and times of John L. Sulli- 
an. the prize fighter. Frank Tuttle directs 
ireg McClure, Linda Darnell and Barbara 
Sritton. 

Columbia launched ''Sergeant Mike," a story 
ft the Army's K9 Corps, presenting Larry 
5 arks, Jeanne Bates, Ross Hunter and Loren 
Tindall, with Henry Levin directing for Pro- 
ucer Jack Fier, and "The Unknown,'' a story 
f German prisoners of war, which Sam White 
R producing, Robert Wilmot directing. 

RKO Radio brought "The Brighton Strang- 
er" before the cameras. It's a thrill film laid 
n wartime London with Max Nosseck direct- 
ng for Herman Schlom, producer. John Lo- 
er, Rose Hobart, June Duprez, Michael St. 
,vngel, Rex Evans, Olaf Hytten and David 
rhursby are cast. 

Three Studios at Capacity 
Shooting This Month 

Republic started work on a Western, "Fire- 
. rands of Arizona," starring Smiley Burnette 
jnd Sunset Carson. Lesley Selander is di- 
Jecting, Lou Gray producing. 
' Four pictures are scheduled to start at War- 
liers in July, bringing the total shooting for 
[he month to 10, largest number in the studio's 
'listory. New features due to go before the 
ameras include "San Antonio," Errol Flynn 
,ilm, which Raoul Walsh will direct for Robert 
•iuckner, producer; "Happiness," which has 
>een assigned to Julius J. and Philip G. Ep- 
tein ; "God Is My Co-Pilot," from the best- 
eller by Colonel Robert Lee Scott, which Rob- 
rt Florey will direct for Buckner, and "Of 
luman Bondage," which Henry Blanke will 
•roduce, with Eleanor Parker in the leading 
eminine role. 
At Paramount, eight features and two short 



subjects in production have put every stage on 
the lot into work. There are 18 stages, of 
which three are occupied by John Farrow's 
"Two Years Before the Mast." Among the 
sets are the two-master, Pilgrim, and four in- 
terior breakdowns of the ship. Mark Sand- 
rich has four units working in different loca- 
tions on the lot, all busy on "Here Come the 
Waves," musical starring Bing Crosby, Betty 
Hutton and Sonny Tufts. "A Medal for Ben- 
ny" occupies two stages, as does "Kitty," in 
which Mitchell Leisen is directing Paulette 
Goddard and Ray Milland. 

Eight Planned by RKO, Led 
By "Experiment Perilous" 

Eight pictures will be put into production at 
RKO Radio between now and August 1. Head- 
ing the list is "Experiment Perilous," starring 
Hedy Lamarr, George Brent and Paul Lukas. 
The screenplay is based on Margaret Carpen- 
ter's best-selling novel, and Jacques Tourneur 
will direct for Robert Fellows, producer. 
Other pictures which will get the starting gun 
are "The Isle of the Dead," starring Boris 
Karloff ; "The Falcon in Hollywood," with Tom 
Conway in the title role; "Nevada," introduc- 
ing the studio's new western actor, Robert 
Mitchum; "Pan-Americana,"' a musical to be 
produced and directed by John Auer ; "Bam- 
boo Blonde," a melodrama of the oil fields ; 
and "Betrayal from the East." 

V 

Alfred Zeisler is slated to direct W. R. 
Frank's next production, "L'Affaire Lafarge." 
. . . Joseph Sistrom's first assignment on his 
return from England will be Paramount's all- 
star "Duffy's Tavern," with a cast which in- 
cludes William Bendix, Bob Hope, Ed Gard- 
ner, Charlie Kantor and Eddie Green. . . . RKO 
Radio has purchased "Gallant Weekend" for 
production by Robert Fellows. . . . Henry King 
will direct "A Bell for Adano," dramatiza- 
tion of the best-selling novel, at Twentieth 
Century-Fox. . . . William Pine and William 
Thomas have assigned "Homesick Angel" as 
the first picture for Lew Landers, director, un- 
der his three-picture deal with them. . . . Lar- 
ry Woodin has been appointed studio publicity 
director at Republic, replacing John LeRoy 



Johnston, who resigned to join International 
Pictures. 

Dennis Morgan will play the title role in 
Warners' "A Night at Tony Pastor's." . . . 
Rhonda Fleming and Michael Chekov have 
been signed for important parts in "The House 
of Dr. Edwardes," which Alfred Hitchcock will 
direct for David O. Selznick. . . . Edward Cline 
is set to direct Universal's comedy with mu- 
sic, "Night Life," in which Vivian Austin and 
Billy Dunn have top roles. 

Republic Names Cast for 
John Wayne Vehicle 

Joseph Schildkraut and Helen Vinson will 
have principal parts in Republic's "Flame of 
Barbary Coast," John Wayne starrer. Also at 
Republic, Frank McDonald will direct Roy 
Rogers' next western, "Lights of Old Santa Fe." 

Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer, who were 
teamed in "Love Affair" some years ago, will 
again co-star in an untitled romantic drama to 
be made by Columbia. . . . Grant Mitchell has 
been added to the cast of Paramount's "A 
Medal for Benny." . . . Frank Dunn will por- 
tray a radio commentator in "Now It Can Be 
Told," story of the FBI in wartime, which 
Louis de Rochemont is producing for Twenti- 
eth Century-Fox. . . . Two new properties have 
been acquired by RKO Radio. One of them, 
"Galveston," centers around that city's famous 
hurricane early in this century. The other, 
"Stars in Her Hair," concerns a racketeer. 

16 Directors and Producers 
On Universal's Roster 

Universal's roster of directors and producer- 
directors now numbers 16, the largest in the 
company's history. Frank Ryan is currently 
handling the megaphone on "Can't Help Sing- 
ing," Deanna Durbin starrer. Charles Lamont 
is shooting "Bowery to Broadway," Jean Yar- 
brough is directing "In Society," which stars 
Abbott and Costello, and John Rawlins is in 
New Mexico shooting "Queen of the Nile." 
Other directors on the studio's payroll include 
Reginald LeBorg, Robert Siodmak, Lewis Col- 
lins, Ray Taylor, Edward F. Cline, Edward 
Lilley, Ford Beebe, Roy William Neill, Felix 
Feist, Charles David, George W r aggner and 
Erie Kenton. 



Weidman to Join Cagney 

Jean Weidman, the eastern editor of Producers' 
Reading Company, has jointed William Cagney 
Productions as assistant to the story editor, Peggy 
Bleakley. 



OTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



33 



RidiV high . . . with the clamor girl 
of the Ozarks ... in a zany, stream- 
lined musical jamboree of joy! 



> t 1» 




4i 



* 



ROSS HUNTER 
RICHARD LANE 
LLOYD BRIDGES 
HOBART CAVANAUGH 

Screen play by Paul Yawitz 
Directed by CHARLES BARTON 





brwg- you... 




4 WD JWf 



WAC Announces 
Award Winners 



British Scientists See 
Trans-Ocean Television 



Report of Radio Engineers 
Predicts Revolution in 
Post-war Entertainment 

by PETER BURNUP 

in London 

Side-stepping the inordinately delayed con- 
clusions of the Government's own inquiry into 
the post-war possibilities of television, comes a 
report of the British Institution of Radio En- 
gineers' committee on the same subject. 

The Institution was founded in 1925 "to pro- 
mote the general advancement of and to facili- 
tate the exchange of opinion and ideas on ra- 
dio science." Its members have contributed in- 
valuable if, for security reasons, necessarily 
secret service in the prosecution of the war ; 
are now, as they have been for many months, 
contributing to the eradication of the current 
Nazi plague of radio-controlled, pilotless air- 
craft. 

Foresees Exciting Future 

Boldly, the Institution proclaims its faith in 
a post-war revolution in public entertainment. 
It foresees nationwide television with its pos- 
sible extension across the Atlantic; colored 
stereoscopic television relayed to motion pic- 
ture theatres ; a big increase in broadcasting 
by the introduction of short-wave transmis- 
sion ; sound films in the home with an increased 
popularity for home recording of gramophone 
records ; wireless telephone calls from London 
to New York or Calcutta as reliable as a local 
call. 

Great Britain, says the report, established a 
lead in television development prior to the 
war. The position, it urges, must be regained 
as quickly as possible ; to which end certain 
broad avenues of approach are postulated. 
They are: 

(1) That the service be "broadcast," i.e. 
there shall be a non-directional transmission 
without wires. 

(2) That the vision and sound transmis- 
sions be of the same order of carrier frequency 
as pre-war. With regard to the assignment of 
any new frequencies required, a conservative 
policy is advocated having regard to the pos- 
sibility of echo trouble at higher carrier fre- 
quencies. 

(3) That the radio band width for vision 
transmission be of the same order as pre-war, 
four megacycles approximately. 

Wide Scope for Electronics 

Dilating on the vast strides made during the 
war in the comparatively new science of elec- 
tronics, the report admits that, in the mind of 
the layman, post-war radio development centers 
around television. While this may be the most 
spectacular radio product and probably will be 
the most important commercially, as judged by 
the immediate volume of business, the scope of 
electronics is infinitely wider. 

It is here, say the investigators, that the mo- 
tion picture theatre enters the pattern. Vast 
and revolutionary improvements are imminent, 
it is suggested, in stereoscopy and color. They 
will demand, for their full employment, public 
dissemination on the broad screen of the mo- 
tion picture theatre. By inference, the exhibitor 
is advised to take stock of his position and to 



look well into the future so that he may not 
be overwhelmed in some sudden avalanche of 
changed mediums. 

All these developments, maintains the In- 
stitution, are dependent on state control of 
the ether, although it points out that control 
of transmission does not necessarily imply 
Government monopoly of radio entertainment. 

The development of radio in wartime has 
led to so many new applications in the ultra 
high frequency spectrum (short-wave) that 
some control must be exercised by the Gov- 
ernment in order to make the most useful and 
economic allocations in the newly available 
wave-bands to meet the increasing needs of 
industry and the requirements of communi- 
cation services. 

Seek Statement on Policy 

In order that the design of receivers may 
be planned well in advance, it is desirable that 
a statement on the national policy regarding 
the use of transmission systems after the war 
should be issued bv the Government. 

Our inquirers envisage, moreover, a vast in- 
crease in home-recording. In the years before 
the war, they say, interest in home-recording 
was growing rapidly, and will be greatly in- 
tensified after the war. The home-recorder 
will become supplementary to the cine camera, 
and the addition of sound equipment, possibly 
using part of the radio set, to the cine film 
projectors would open up the possibility of 
sound films in the home, with central libraries 
offering a choice of all types of films for every 
purpose. 

They forecast, too, that the whole pattern 
of public education may be changed, not only 
by the introduction of motion picture projectors 
in the schools— a strong movement is afoot in 
Britain, for the compulsory adoption of such 
methods — but by the utilization of a television 
system. One of the most interesting features 
of the British Broadcasting Corporation's ser- 
vice, particularly since the outbreak of war, 
has been transmission to schools. Tentative at 
the outset, the transmissions have gradually 
evolved their own technique; are a regular 
feature of the curriculum of half the country's 
schools. Clearly, television here will be an im- 
mense ancillary advantage. 

Industry Must Watch Trend 

Thus the broad conclusions of Britain's ra- 
dio engineers. Of necessity, they are concerned 
only with the scientific aspect of the develop- 
ments. But they may be commended to the 
earnest consideration of all branches of the mo- 
tion picture industry. 

Said one far-seeing engineer : "No one de- 
nies the gregarious instinct which will still 
impel people to assemble in the public theatre. 
All that we aim to do, so far as the motion 
picture is concerned, is to point out the in- 
evitable developments which will occur." 

It is known here that preliminary conversa- 
tions have been taking place in certain extremely 
influential financial groups on the practicability 
of establishing some central disseminating 
point and diffusing from there into public 
theatres not only up-to-the-minute pictures of 
current events but programs of purely enter- 
tainment content. 

The views of the radio engineers are worthy 
of close scrutiny by the film trade. 



Exchange managers throughout the country who 
are to receive War Activities Committee citations 
for their services as distribution chairmen in their 
territories since the formation of the WAC were 
named last week by Ned E. Depinet, chairman o 
the distribution committee. 

The citations are in the form of wall plaques and 
will be presented managers at the completion of 
their terms with WAC, in appreciation of their 
services. Following is a list of chairmen to whom 
plaques are being sent : 

Joseph Miller, Albany ; E. B. Price, Atlanta ; 
Sydney Lehman. Buffalo ; J. J. Donohue, Chicago ; 
Harry Young, Cincinnati ; James Hendel, Cleve- 
land ; R. J. Morrison, Denver ; L. J. McGinley, In- 
dianapolis, George W. Fuller, Kansas City ; Roger 
Mahan, New Haven ; E. V. Landaiche, New Or- 
leans ; R. B. Williams, Oklahoma City; J. H. 
Jacobs, Omaha; William G. Mansell, Philadelphia; 
Harry A. Seed, Pittsburgh ; A. R. Anderson, Port- 
land ; Hall Walsh, St. Louis ; S. J. Gardner, Salt 
Lake City ; L. G. Wingham, San Francisco ; Max 
Cohen, Washington ; C. G. Eastman, Albany ; W. 
O. Williamson, Atlanta ; Fred R. Dodson, Atlanta. 

I, H. Rogovin, Boston; Sydney Samson, Buffalo; 
J.' H. Dillon, Charlotte; Clyde Eckhardt, Chicago; 
Thomas R. Gilliam, Chicago ; J. J. Oulahan, Cin- 
cinnati ; I. J. Schmertz, Cleveland; S. M. Sachs, 
Dallas; Chester J. Bell, Denver; Earl A. Bell, Den- 
ver ; Mel H. Evidon, Des Moines ; Frank J. 
Downey, Detroit ; G. Richard Frank, Indianapolis ; 
W. E. Truog, Kansas City ; Wawne C. Ball, Los 
Angeles ; J. F. Willingham, Memphis ; J. H. 
Lorentz, Milwaukee ; L. J. Miller, Minneapolis ; 
Philip Sherman, New Haven ; Barney Pitkin, 
New Haven ; James Briant, New Orleans ; Robert 
Wolff, New York. 

C. H. Weaver, Oklahoma City ; F. J. Hannon, 
Omaha ; Robert Lynch, Philadelphia ; J. J. Ma- 
loney, Pittsburgh; R. O. Wilson, Portland; Lester 
J. Bona, St. Louis ; William F. Gordon, Salt Lake 
City; H. Neal East, San Francisco; Al Laurice, 
San Francisco ; Edward A. Lamb, Seattle ; Robert 
Smeltzer, Washington ; S. N. Wheeler, Washing- 
ton ; D. A. Levy, New Jersey ; Len Gruenberg, 
Denver and Salt Lake City ; William Marriott, In- 
dianapolis. 

Autry Sues to Terminate 
Contract with Republic 

Sergeant Gene Autry has filed suit in Los 
Angeles Superior Court against Republic Produc- 
tion, Inc., seeking declaratory relief from his star- 
ring agreement with that company on the ground 
that his entry into the armed forces frustrates 
performance of the contract, and therefore the 
pact should be terminated. Second basis for his 
action is the allegation that Republic failed to ex- 
ercise an option within the time contractually 
stipulated. 

Cartoon Producers Adopt 
Higher Rental Plan 

The Cartoon Producers Association last week 
in Hollywood adopted Walter Lantz's plans for 
obtaining higher rentals from exhibitors, and de- 
cided upon an educational campaign as a first step. 
The campaign was to be developed at subsequent 
meetings. Mr. Lantz, from a survey based on his 
operating costs, said that costs had risen 40 per 
cent since 1942 while prices had remained static. 



Stein and Ticktin Feted 

Max Stein and Irving Ticktin of Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox's advertising department were tendered 
a bachelor luncheon by their home office associ- 
ates, in the Pan American Room of Rogers Cor- 
ner, New York, last week. Charles Schlaifer, ad- 
vertising manager, was toastmaster. 



Warner Gives Training Film 

Jack L. Warner, executive producer for Warner 
Bros., has presented a 16mm print of "Action in 
the North Atlantic" to the U. S. Maritime Train- 
ing Station at Sheepshead Bay, N. Y., where the 
picture will be used for instruction. 



36 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



WARNER BROS.' TRADE SHOWINGS OF 

BETTE DAVIS 

in 

"MR. SKEFFINGTON 



MONDAY, JULY 17th, 1944 



riTV 

V.1 1 T 




AUUKCJ3 


TIME 
1 l/Vlt 


Albany 


Warner Screening Room 


79 N. Pearl St. 


12:30 P.M. 


Atlanta 


RKO Screening Room 


191 Walton St. N.W. 


2:00 P.M. 


Boston 


RKO Screening Room 


122 Arlington St. 


2:00 P.M. 


Buffalo 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


290 Franklin St. J 


2:00 P.M. 


Charlotte 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


308 S. Church St. 


10:00 A.M. 


Chicago 


Warner Screening Room 


1307 So. Wabash Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


Cincinnati 


RKO Screening Room 


Palace Th. Bldg. E. 6th 


8:00 P.M. 


Cleveland 


Warner Screening Room 


2300 Payne Ave. 


8:00 P.M. 


Dallas 


Paramount Sc. Room 


412 S. Harwood 


2:00 P.M. 


Denver 


Paramount Sc. Room 


2100 Stout St. 


2 :00 P.M. 


Des Moines 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1300 High St. 


12:45 P.M. 


Detroit 


Film Exchange Bldg. 


2310 Cass Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


Indianapolis 


Paramount Sc. Room 


116 W. Michigan 


1:00 P.M. 


Kansas City 


Paramount Sc. Room 


18th and Wyandotte 


1:30 P.M. 


Los Angeles 


Vitagraph Sc. Room 


2025 S. Vermont Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


Memphis 


Paramount Sc. Room 


362 S. Second St. 


11:00 A.M. 


Milwaukee 


Warner Th. Sc. Rm. 


212 W. Wisconsin Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


Minneapolis 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1015 Currie Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


New Haven 


Warner Th. Proj. Room 


70 College St. 


1:00 P.M. 


New Orleans 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


200 S. Liberty St. 


10:00 A.M. 


New York 


Home Office 


321 W. 44th St. 


2:30 P.M. 


Oklahoma 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


10 North Lee Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


Omaha 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1502 Davenport St. 


1:00 P.M. 


Philadelphia 


Vine St. Sc. Room 


1220 Vine St. 


11:00 A.M. 


Pittsburgh 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1715 Blvd. of Allies 


2:00 P.M. 


Portland 


Star Screening Room 


925 N. W. 19th Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


Salt Lake 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


216 East 1st South 


2:00 P.M. 


San Francisco 


Republic Sc. Room 


221 Golden Gate Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


Seattle 


Jewel Box Sc. Rm. 


2318 Second Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


St. Louis 


S'renco Sc. Room 


3143 Olive St. 


1:00 P.M. 


Washington 


Earle Th. Bldg. 


13th & E Sts. N.W. 


10:30A.M. 



WER STOP TILL YOU'RE OVER THE TOP! FIGHTING FIFTH WAR LOAN'. 



PRC Budget for 
1944-45 to Be 
$7,385,000 

PRC will have a budget of $7,385,000 for its 
1944-45 production program and expansion, Leon 
Fromkess, vice-president in charge of production 
and general manager of PRC, announced at the 
company's fifth annual sales convention at the Es- 
sex House, New York, last week. As the start 
of the advertising budget for the program, which 
consists of a minimum of 24 features and 16 West- 
erns, an initial sum of $120,000 has been allocated. 

The budget is the largest to date for the com- 
pany, and will be obtained through Pathe Indus- 
tries, Inc., under which a coalition of four PRC 
companies and three Pathe companies was effected 
last week. 

Mr. Fromkess disclosed that an arrangement had 
been concluded with NBC on the coast to televise 
a feature based on the life of Dr. Jose Rozzal, a 
Philippine hero, after the film was released. In 
addition the story of the picture will be broadcast 
in three weekly half-hour episodes on NBC's "Paci- 
fic Coast'' program. 

Mr. Fromkess announced that franchise holders 
unanimously approved the modified distributor con- 
tracts, adding that "the new franchise agreement 
is more in keeping with the biggei budget pictures 
that we're now producing." The agreement runs 
to 1950. 

To Withdraw "Bell Tolls" 
Until February, 1945 

In accordance with Paramount's promise of a 
year ago. "For Whom the Bell Tolls" will be 
withdrawn from release as a road show attraction 
August 1, and will not be shown again until Feb- 
ruary, 1945, when it will be released for showing 
at popular prices. At the sessions of the Para- 
mount-Canadian sales convention' last week, it was 
announced the film would be released for the first 
time in Canada next autumn in conjunction with 
the 1944-45 product. 

Warner Checking Field 
Supervisors Named 

Two changes in the field supervisory staff of 
the Warner Bros. Picture Checking Service have 
been announced by R. P. Hagen, manager of the 
checking service, on his return from Cincinnati 
and Cleveland. H. B. Sellers has been transferred 
from Cincinnati to Cleveland, where he will serve 
as supervisor of the Cleveland and Detroit ter- 
ritories, replacing J. M. Houston. Morrell V. 
Martin succeeds Mr. Sellers as field supervisor 
for the Cincinnati and Indianapolis areas. 

Grantland Rice Sportlights 
Celebrate 25th Birthday 

Grantland Rice Sportslights this year celebrates 
the 25th anniversary with a change of pace in its 
production program. The autumn of 1944 starts the 
Grantland Rice Sportlights' 25th season, the 13th 
with Paramount. More than 400 individual sub- 
jects have been produced since the inception of 
the Sportlights, according to producer Jack Eaton. 



Variety Club Outing July 17 

The Cincinnati Variety Club will hold its annual 
picnic at Summit Hills Country Club, July 17. 
Noah Schecter is general chairman of the com- 
mittee, with Mike Greenberg assistant chairman. 
The club will hold its annual golf tournament Aug- 
ust 21, with William Onie general committee chair- 
man, and Mr. Greenberg assistant. James J. Grady 
is general chairman of the prize committee. 



Horror Dual Release Set 

Columbia will release "Cry of the Were-wolf" 
and "Death Walks Alone" (tentative title) simul- 
taneously August 17 in order to give exhibitors 
an opportunity to book the two as a single pack- 
age. 



Officers Named to Committees 
On Film Standards 

Captain C H. Phillips, Lt. J. A. Hancock, and 
Warrant Officer S. P. Balcomb, all of the Army 
Air Forces Materiel Command at Wright Field, 
Dayton, Ohio, have been appointed members of 
sub-committees of the American Standards Asso- 
ciation's War Committee on Photography and 
Cinematography. 

Captain Phillips was appointed to the sub-com- 
mittees on still picture printing and projection and 
on camera noise measurement ; Lt. Hancock to 
the sub-committee on still camera equipment; and 
Warrant Officer Balcomb to the sub-committees 
on 16mm motion picture laboratory practice and 
16mm motion picture projection. 

The scope of the war committee's activities 
comprises the preparation of American War 
Standard specifications and standards for ap- 
paratus, raw and finished materials, and devices 
in the fields of photography and cinematography. 

Keiths Files Clearance 
Complaint at Boston 

H&H Enterprises, Inc., operators of the 
Keith's theatre, first run in Fairhaven, Mass., 
filed a clearance complaint with the Boston ar- 
bitration tribunal this week against all five 
consenting companies. 

The complainant charges that existing clear- 
ance between Keiths and the Capitol, Baylies 
Square, Strand and Rialto, all New Bedford 
houses, is unreasonable and should be abolished 
or reduced to a minimum of one day. This is 
Boston's 36th case. 

The clearance complaint filed in May of the 
New Ogden theatre in Chicago, operated by 
Ben Cooney, and against Paramount, RKO, 
Twentieth Century-Fox and Vitagraph, was 
withdrawn July 3 by general stipulation signed 
by all the parties. 

Name Winning Managers in 
Scully Sales Drive 

W. A. Scully, vice-president and general sales 
manager of Universal, has made public the list 
of winning branch managers in the recently com- 
pleted Bill Scully Anniversary Drive. First prizes 
went to D. A. Levy, New York; Jack Langan, 
Kansas City, and J. V. Pavone, New Haven. Sec- 
ond prizes : Foster Blake, Los Angeles ; L. Brauer, 
Charlotte, and Sam Milner, Seattle. Third prizes : 
Lon Hoss, San Francisco; W. M. Richardson, 
Atlanta and Mayer Monsky, Denver. Fourth 
prizes : P. T. Dana, Pittsburgh ; Harry Hines, 
St. Louis and C. R. Wade, Salt Lake City. Fifth 
prizes : George Schwartz, Philadelphia ; Frank 
Mantzke, Milwaukee and R. O. Wilson, Portland. 



G-B Subsidiary Reports 
Net Profit of $710,000 

Provincial Cinematograph Theatres, of the Gau- 
mont-British group, had a new high trading profit 
of $5,156,496 during the past year, compared with 
$4,912,500 the year before, according to an an- 
nouncement in London this week. With the excess 
profits tax, however, absorbing $2,136,144 and the 
income tax $1,399,396, the company's net profit was 
cut to $710,000. A dividend of 15 per cent was de- 
clared on Provincial's ordinary shares, going main- 
ly to Gaumont-British. 



Cahoon Joins Princeton Center 

James Cahoon, until recently a film editor for 
the overseas motion picture division of the Office 
of War Information, has joined the Princeton 
Film Center to take charge of that organization's 
documentary film editing. Mr. Cahoon formerly 
was an editor for Columbia Pictures in Holly- 
wood. 



Acquires Burton Holmes Films 

Bell & Howell's filmsound library has acquired 
the entire library of educational and travel films 
produced and distributed by Burton Holmes, the 
company announced in Chicago this week. 



Warner Net Profi 
For Six Months 

Is $3,492,125 

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., and subsidiary cot 
panies last week reported for the six months endc 
February 26, 1944, net profit of $3,492,125 aft« 
provision of $625,000 for unrealized losses on fixq 
assets (on sales contracted for subsequent to Fel 
ruary 26, 1944, but not yet consummated) less est 
mated tax benefits resulting therefrom, as compan 
with a net operating profit of $4,14il,199 for the co 
responding period last year. 

This is the equivalent of 94 cents per share o 
the 3,701,090 shares of common stock outstandin 
as compared with $1.06 per share for the com 
sponding period last year, after provision for div 
dends on the preferred stock then outstanding. 

The gross income, after eliminating intercompan 
transactions, for the six months ended Februar 
26, 1944, was $69,629,010. The gross income fc 
the six months ended February 27, 1943, wf 
$63,409,868. 

Lieut. Dunn, Former Theatre 
Manager, an Air Hero 

Lieut. Robert C. Dunn, 27, who prior to his en 
listment in the Army, managed the Trail theatre I 
Colorado Springs for the Cooper Foundation, i 
being hailed in his home town for valor. Whil 
over Ploesti, Romania, on his fifteenth missiol 
the bomb bays would not close because of a carl 
ridge wedged in the doors. This would have ind] 
cated trouble to the Nazi fighters in the area. Lieu 
Dunn performed the delicate job amid shatteritl 
bursts of fire. Lieut. Dunn, who wears the Aj 
Medal with four oak leaf clusters, also was awarde 
the Purple Heart. 



To Check Child Matinees 

Because there seems to be a question as ( 
whether the type of Saturday matinee pictun 
shown at various Cincinnati theatres are suitabl 
for children, the Mental Hygiene Association hi 
approved a resolution to ask the Parent-Teach< 
groups of the city and county to investigate tj 
matter and make a report. 



Knutson Signs with Altec 

Barclay Ardell, Seattle District Manager I 
Altec Service Corporation, announces the signin 
of agreements for sound service and repair zi 
replacement parts with the Knutson Circuit \ 
theatres in Livingston, Miles City and Harlowto: 
in Montana, and Hailey, Idaho. 



Von Herberg Buys Theatre 

In a deal involving $500,000, Jensen von Herbei] 
pioneer Northwest theatre owner, has purchase 
the 1,600-seat Mt. Baker theatre in Bellinghan 
Wash., and 17 adjoining stores from the Mt. Bakf 
Amusement Company, subsidiary of Evergree 
State Theatres. 



Open Summer Policy 

The Strand Theatre, Sound View, Conn., open< 
June 24 for a summer film policy. The Moodi 
theatre, Moodus, Conn., formerly on a Saturda; 
Sunday and Monday schedule, opened June 24 f( 
full week showings. Reports are coming in i 
renewed theatre activity all along the Connectici 
shore line. 



Sells Oregon Theatre 

T. C. Poorman who has owned and operated tt 
Bungalow theatre, Woodburn, Ore., for the pai 
15 years, has disposed of it to Mr. and Mrs. W. I 
Bussler. 



Republic Office Moved 

The Republic exchange in Cincinnati has move 
into quarters formerly occupied by Universal in til 
Film Exchange Building. Universal occupies il 
own building constructed some time ago. 



38 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 194 



He of Shares by 
ick Warner Is 
sported by SEC 

h'mgton Bureau 

/ansactions by officers and directors of a num- 
of motion picture corporations in the securi- 
j of their companies were disclosed last Fri- 
' by the Securities and Exchange Cemmission 
Is summary of such transactions in May but, 
few exceptions, the deals involved only 
lvely small sized blocks. 

!.rgest May transaction reported was the pur- 
•e of 5,000 shares of Warner Brothers corn- 
stock by Jack L. W arner, vice-president, giv- 
c him a total of 205,000 shares. 
; numerically larger transaction was reported 
Universal Pictures, but this did not involve a 
,<et deal. It was an exchange by Cliff Work, 
president, of 15,000 common voting trust cer- 
ite warrants for a like number of certificates, 
ng him at the close of the month with the 
)0 certificates and 3,000 warrants. In the same 
aany, Charles D. Prutzman, vice-president, 
anged 1,000 warrants for that number of cer- 
ites, and disposed of 100 warrants by gift, 
:ng at the close of the month 7,000 certificates 
j 12,300 warrants. 

\ large block of stock also was involved in 
(sale of 10,000 shares of Translux Corpora - 
: common stock by Percy N. Furber, board 
" man, but this occurred in April ; at the close 
nat month, Mr. Furber held 14,320 shares of 
company's common stock, 
her belated returns showed the purchase of 
: shares of Paramount Pictures common stock 
Nqvember by Adolph Zukor, board chairman, 
lg him a total of 500 shares, and the sale of 
shares of Monogram Pictures common stock 
ipril by Samuel Broidy, vice-president, leav- 
liim with 3,800 shares. 

' her reports showed the sale of 200 shares of 
':ral Precision Equipment capital stock by Earl 
lines, president, leaving him with 1,300 shares; 
purchase of 12 shares of Loew's Boston 
itres common stock by Loew's, Inc., giving it 
tal of 121,108 shares; the sale of 500 shares 
oew's, Inc., common stock by David Bernstein, 
urer, through a corporation which had 19,050 
es left, and the sale of one share of Mono- 
i Pictures common stock by William R. Hurl- 
director, leaving him with 3,363 shares. 
;ports on the holdings of persons becoming 
,:rs or directors of registered corporations 
.ed 2,300 shares of Twentieth Century-Fox 
non stock held by Robert Lehman, when he 
me a director May 16, but no Consolidated 
i Industries securities held by Jack E. Baker, 
ed a director May 2, or John 0. Connell, who 
me a director April 1. 

• oing My Way" Heads for 
w Paramount Record 

joing My Way," the Bing Crosby starring pic- 
j produced and directed by Leo McCarey which 
; :ed its tenth week at the New York Paramount 
itre July 5 has established the most remark- 
box-office record in the history of that house, 
rding to Charles M. Reagan, Paramount vice 
ident in charge of distribution. The picture 
ot only tying the ten-week run of "Lady in the 
k," the longest in the 18-year history of the 
tre, but its total gross will exceed that of the 
rer Rogers picture, Mr. Reagan said. 
Joing My Way" in its first three weeks ran 
'nd "Lady in the Dark" but in its fourth week 
Crosby picture grossed more than it had taken 
ither its second or third weeks and jumped 
ahead of the fourth week's take of "Lady in 
Dark." "Going My Way" in its eighth week 
le New York Paramount took only $248 less 

its box office in its sixth week, 
sfore the 10-week run of "Lady in the Dark" 
all-time record of the New York Paramount 
held by "Star Spangled Rhythm" which in 
"uary, 1943, ended an eight-week run at the 
adway house. 



Prefect Theatres' Motion 
For New Trial Denied 

Judge Carroll Hincks in Federal District Court 
at New Haven Wednesday denied the Prefect 
Theatres' motion for a new trial of its $5,452,575 
anti trust suit against distributing companies. 
Judge Hincks took the case away from the jury 
on April 14, and handed down a verdict for the 
defense following the plaintiff's testimony. The 
court denied the motion for a new trial because 
testimony of the plaintiff was "devoid of evidence 
of damages to the business." The ease will be 
carried to the U. S. District Court of Appeals. 



WAC Film Shows 
Rome Campaign 

Twenty minutes of war in Italy, unrelieved by 
comedy, sarcasm, inspiration, or any of the usual 
devices in narration and editing, were shown to the 
trade press Wednesday morning, at the MGM 
home office projection room, New York. The pic- 
ture was the War Department's "The Liberation 
of Rome," compiled from footage exposed by 
British and American army cameramen. The 
subject will be shown to the American people, be- 
ginning July 13, by the War Activities Committee, 
for which MGM is distributing this film. 

The film is notable in several aspects. It is 
timely. Rome was taken June 4 and the push which 
began on the Anzio beachhead and the Cassino and 
southern end of the Italian front began May 11. 

It is photographed superbly. There are many 
in-the-battle scenes, of ships being bombed, of self- 
propelled guns firing, of sweating, intent artiller- 
ists, of German prisoners overwhelmed by unend- 
ing barrages, of men dead and dying, of Germans 
evacuating Rome, of house-to-house street fighting. 

It is edited with dramatic sense ; it begins with 
the entrance into Italy via Messina and Salerno, 
shows the easy progress up Italy's heel and toe, 
the sharp and terrible and uncertain battles for 
Salerno and Ortona, the impasse before Cassino, 
the jagged mountains and rough rivers which 
stopped the Allies. Then it shows the plan, the 
barrage, and the progress of the offensive of 
May 11, which joined the Anzio beachhead to the 
main line, smashed the Germans, and brought 
Rome's liberation. 

Finally, it is crammed with short, harshly im- 
pressive pictures : of, for instances, the burial of 
an Italian farm family of five, pathetically muti- 
lated after being locked in their home and dyna- 
mited by retreating German engineers ; the smash- 
ing of the Benedictine monastery above Cassino by 
aerial bombs ; the equally smashing aerial attack 
upon the town, which seems to erupt before the 
camera ; the marching, by Germans, of American 
prisoners through Rome streets ; the Germans, in- 
tent, prepared, on the heights of Salerno ; the Pope, 
imploring, from his balcony, the blessings of the 
Lord for the multitudes below, who assembled as 
the Allies liberated the Holy City. 

The picture also shows the war in Italy as not 
less horrible, nor less deserving of attention and 
effort, than other struggles ; audiences will be im- 
pressed by an up-to-date, comprehensive, well in- 
tegrated story of a feat of American arms dramatic 
in world events, and this time narrated by an 
American voice. — F. E. S. 



John MacLeod, Loew Exchange 
Maintenance Head, Killed 

John MacLeod, head of exchange maintenance of 
Loew's, Inc., was killed in the wreck of the Santa 
Fe Railroad's crack train, the Chief, 20 miles west 
of Williams, Arizona, late Monday night. He was 
55. Mr. MacLeod was with Loew's 29 years. He 
lived at the Mayflower Hotel, New York. 

He entered films in 1915 as assistant auditor for 
Sawyer Film Company, later joining Metro Pic- 
tures accounting department. He was appointed 
head of MGM Exchange Maintenance in 1929. 
He is survived by his widow, Ida, a son, Donald, 
two brothers, David and Ross, and a sister. 

Injured in the wreck was Mimi Forsythe. fea- 
tured in the "Sensations of 1945" and wife of 
United Artists' producer Benedict Bogeaus. 



All Producers in 
Mexico Face New 
Federal Taxation 

by LUIS BECERRA CELIS 

in Mexico City 

Producers are worried by reporjs that the Min- 
istry of Finance intends soon to levy upon them 
a retroactive five per cent tax on receipts during 
recent years. Imposition of this tax, it is under- 
stood, is merely, from the Ministry's standpoint, 
that the producers are no longer struggling but 
are prospering, so therefore the Government in- 
dulgence in the form, of exemption from all Fed- 
eral taxes granted them more than two years ago 
no longer need be maintained. 

This tax exemption was voluntarily allowed by 
a presidential decree early in 1942, as part of the 
administration's plan to aid the industry. 

The producers, generally, admit that the Gov- 
ernment's decision to cease helping them is reason- 
able, because they are now more than able to 
stand on their feet and the war has placed a 
burden on the national treasury, but they resent 
the Ministry's intent to make this tax retroactive, 
to cover the period when the Government aided 
them by exempting them from Federal levies. 

The producers have expressed wonder why the 
Ministry singled them out to start applying Fed- 
eral taxes, instead of the whole industry. They 
say that of the rich returns from some pictures, 
the producers almost invariably receive the least. 
Some producers, they say, do well if they can 
take a three per cent net profit per picture. They 
point to players who two years ago were glad to 
work for $2,000 per picture who are now not much 
moved when they are offered $10,000. 

According to these producers, theatre taxation 
(always made right in the box office after each 
day's show) is 15 per cent in the Federal Dis- 
trict, which includes this city, and runs as high as 
24 per cent in some states. Distributors are said 
to average 15 per cent per picture. 

V 

Substantiating statements made here recently in 
his behalf that he intends to establish in or about 
this city a television service and make the Mexi- 
can capital his permanent home, Lee de Forrest, 
thje inventor, now visiting with his wife, an- 
nounced that he will do both. He intimated that 
the home establishment would come first and later 
plans would be started for the television plant. 

Mr. and Mrs. De Forrest were received at a 
special audience by President Manuel Avila Ca- 
macho. They were designated the official guests 
of Mexico and the Federal District. 

V 

Mazatlan, key Pacific port, is soon to have a 
de luxe first run theatre with the start of work 
by Joaquin Sanchez Hidalgo. The theatre will 
seat 1,200. It is to cost $150,000 and will be in 
service in the early autumn. 

V 

Mexican film extras are the latest to organize. 
They have formed a sort of union that is affiliated 
with the Confederation of Popular Organizations. 
V 

Another semi-weekly newsreel has started here. 
It is being produced by Alfonso Spino and Manuel 
de Sevilla, with Henry Wallace and Max List as 
the cameramen. 

John Davis, Odeon Circuit Head, 
To Visit U. S. and Canada 

John Davis, managing director of England's 
Odeon Circuit and one of J. Arthur Rank's unoffi- 
cial cabinet members, is expected to leave England 
shortly for Canada to explore the potentialities 
of exhibition tieups there with Rank interests be- 
fore proceeding to the United States to study 
American exhibition operation, it was reported 
in London Tuesday. It is understood that Mr. 
Davis will have extensive conferences with officials 
of Twentieth Century-Fox in connection with the 
production-distribution-exhibition agreement made 
recently between Mr. Rank and Spyros Skouras, 
Twentieth-Fox president. 



ION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



39 



Warners to Open 
Season with High 
Backlog of 22 

Warner Bros, will begin the new season with 
a backlog of 22 features, representing more pic- 
tures than the company released in the season just 
drawing to a close and indicating Warners prob- 
ably will release more than the 19 distributed this 
season. 

Conferences among- Jack L. Warner, executive 
producer ; Ben Kalmenson, general sales manager, 
and Charles Einfeld, director of advertising and 
publicity, which were in progress last week at the 
studio, further indicated the possibility of an in- 
creased release schedule for 1944-45. 

In addition to its backlog of 22, the studio has 
six more features before the cameras, making a 
total of 28. In order to avoid a top-heavy in- 
ventory, Warners are expected to increase their 
releases for next season. No official announce- 
ment has been made of the policy to be pursued, 
but Wafner executives annually announce the com- 
pany will release films "depending entirely on mar- 
ket conditions and ability to deliver," adhering to 
a "flexible policy." 

Initial release of 1944-45 from Warners will 
be "Janies," September 2. It is a screen version 
of the Broadway play. According to present plans, 
releases for the first four months of the new sea- 
son, in addition to "Janie," are : "Arsenic and Old 
Lace," on the backlog for two years ; "The Con- 
spirators," "The Doughgirls," screen version of 
the Broadway comedy ; "Hollywood Canteen," 
"Crime by Night," "The Very Thought of You" 
and "The Last Ride," another on the backlog for 
some time. Warners also expect to reissue "Casa- 
blanca" and at least one other feature. 

Pictures completed but not yet designated for 
release include : "Rhapsody in Blue," "Saratoga 
Trunk," "Objective, Burma," "Devotion," "Con- 
flict," "The Animal Kingdom," "The Horn Blows 
at Midnight," "My Reputation" and "Cinderella 
Jones." Now in production are : "To Have and 
Have Not," "Strangers in Our Midst," "Roughly 
Speaking," "The Corn is Green" and "Christmas in 
Connecticut." 

Those scheduled to go before the cameras be- 
fore September, are : "Of Human Bondage." 
"Dark Eyes," "San Antonio,". "A Night at Tony 
Pastor's," "Hotel Berlin, 1943," "God Is My Co- 
Pilot" and "Happiness." In addition, there will 
be one production from Jesse L. Lasky, whose 
schedule now includes three stories : "Don't Ever 
Leave Me," "The Frontiersman" and "The Two 
Mrs. Carrolls." 

It is estimated that Warners plan to spend well 
over $1,000,000 on production per feature. The 
company now has on contract an all-time high of 

25 stars and 55 featured players, in addition to 

26 outside stars and players for special assign- 
ments. The roster has 16 directors, 14 producers, 
34 writers and four composers. 



Raise Prices on Boardwalk 

Effective July 1, all the first run houses on the 
Boardwalk in Atlantic City, N. J., increased ad- 
missions for the Summer season because of in- 
creased costs of operation. The 66 cent top was 
raised to 74 cents. All the houses are operated 
by the Warner theatre circuit on a pooling arrange- 
ment with the Weilland-Lewis Circuit, which owns 
some of the houses. 



Bell & Howell Adds Films 

Two Universal features and a short subject have 
been added to the Bell & Howell Filmosound 
16mm library. They are "Hi Buddy," a musical 
comedy ; "The Amazing Mrs. Holliday," a 1943 
Deanna. Durbin release, and "Roar, Navy, Roar," 
a 20-minute short subject. 



Fidler to Open Office 

Fred H. Fidler, for many years associated with 
J. Walter Thompson Company in the public re- 
lations department, has resigned to open his own 
office in New York, where he will specialize in 
motion picture, television and radio. 



IN NEWSREELS 



MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 26, No. 87— Dewey and Bricker 
nominated on first ballot. . . . Capture of Elba. . . . 
Weird German robot planes. 

MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 26, No. 88— The war on two 

fronts. . . . Drive on Cherbourg. . . . Doodlebug tanks 
.... War in the Pacific: battle on Saipan. . . . Hos- 
pital plane brings wounded from Normandy. . . . Um- 
berto of Italy is shot at while greeting crowd. . . . 
WACs at Anzio. . . . Lady Marines- in training. 
NEWS OF THE DAY— Vol. 15, No. 285— Dewey and 
Bricker hailed by G.O.P. . . - Allies take Napoleon's 
historic isle of Elba. . . . First films of Nazi's secret 
robot bomb. 

NEWS OF THE DAY— Vol. 15, No. 286— Battle of Saipan 

.... Yanks liberate more towns, push forward in 

France. . . . Bricker and Dewey in campaign snapshots 

.... Timber record smashed. 
PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 88 -Invasion of Elba. . . . 

First pictures of Hitlei's robot bomb. . . . Paramount 

News presents the Republican Nominees. 
PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 59— Inside France. . . . Scoop: 

How to keep cool. . . . Politics: Dewey-Bricker map 

campaign. . . . First pictures of Saipan. 
RKO PATHE NEWS— Vol. 15, No. 90— Allies take historic 

island of Elba. . . . First pictures of Nazi's secret robot 

plane. . . . Republicans choose Dewey and Bricker. 
RKO PATHE NEWS— Vol. 15, No. 91— Capture enemy on 

road to Cherbourg. . . . First pictures of Yanks invading 

Saipan. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEL— Vol. 17, No. 307— It's Dewey 
and Bricker. . . . German rocket bombs. . . . Allies take 
Elba. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEL— Vol. 17, No. 308— Saipan is 
ours. . . . Dewey meets press. . . . Women at war. . . . 
Victory on Cherbourg peninsula. . . . Beautiful team 

work. 

ALL AMERICAN NEWS— Vol. 2, No. 89^Negro owned 
and operated Cleveland factory. . . . Juneteenth is cele- 
brated in Dallas. Texas. . . . Gloria Brown of Washing- 
ton. D. C, champ bond seller. . . . Negro clerks handle 
White House messages. . . . Paul R. Williams of Los 
Angeles, noted architect. . . . African troops fight wilder- 
ness. 



Skouras and Fox Theatres 
Settlement Completed 

Papers on file in Federal Court, New York, 
disclosed officially that the settlement between 
Skouras Theatres Corporation, Kitma Corpora- 
tion, a Skouras subsidiary, and the receivers of 
Fox Theatres Corporation, under which Fox 
Theatres creditors will gain approximately $2,- 
500,000, had been completed. 

The settlement was authorized recently by Fed- 
eral Judge John C. Knox, who vacated a 1937 
order of former Judge Martin T. Manton which 
had authorized the sale by Fox to Skouras in- 
terests of the Academy of Music theatre prop- 
erty in East 14th Street, New York, together with 
other Fox assets, at a nominal price. 

Under the settlement, Kitma transferred to Fox 
receivers, for the benefit of creditors, common 
capital stock of the William Fox Realty Corpora- 
tion, and a claim in favor of Fox Theatres Cor- 
poration, against the Fox Realty Corporation, to- 
gether with the Academy of Music property which 
Skouras theatres will fulfill. 



Buys Hartford Building 

The Poli-New England Theatres have sold the 
Coleman. and Clevelan Building, Hartford, Conn., 
to a family syndicate headed by Mayor William 
Mortensen for $250,000. Mayor Mortensen, also 
managing director of the Bushnell Memorial play- 
house, said the city of Hartford could have the 
property at cost, if the City Council voted that 
the area was in line with park beautification plans. 



Releases "Thunder Rock" 

English Films, Inc., of New York, has acquired 
U. S. rights to "Thunder Rock" and soon will 
release the Charter Films productions. John and 
Roy Boulting produced the film in Britain with 
Michael Redgrave and Barbara Mullen in the lead- 
ing roles. It was reviewed in Motion Picture 
Herald October 3, 1942. 



Schechtman with International 

Ben Schectman has been appointed to the staff 
of A. W. Schwalberg, eastern representative of 
International Pictures, Inc. Mr. Schectman has 
been connected with the industry for 15 vears. 
Fe will concentrate on "Casanova Brown," Inter- 
national's initial production, to be released throup-h 
RKO Radio. 



Kuykendall Sees 
No Television 
Competition Now 

"The best television can do in the theatre is t 
equal the picture now reproduced from film, an 
until it develops the artistic and entertainment qual 
ity and the resulting popular appeal of studio- 
produced motion pictures, it will offer little actual! 
competition to the motion picture as commercial i 
entertainment." 

The summation above is from Edward Kuykenj i 
dall, president of, and speaking for, the Motion 
Picture Theatre Owners of America, and is a Vievj 
of television as one of the post-war problems with 
which the July 5 general bulletin, issued over Mr, 
Kuykendall's signature, is concerned. Mr. Kuyj 
kendall sees the need, not of exerting effort on 
post-war problems now, but of contemplating 
them. Discussion, he says, "must begin now, if we 
are going to be prepared" for organized action. 

Television Mr. Kuykendall sees as a "question 
of who's got the best show." Until that question 
is resolved it remains, in his estimation, "idle talk, 
of interest largely to those who are promoting tele- 
vision companies, equipment, stations, etc., and to 
radio, with which it is in direct competition for 
both listeners and advertisers." 

Television is but one competitor ; the theatre man 
must worry now about the aggregate competition 
and Mr. Kuykendall asks : "Can we hold our cus 
tomers against the renewed allure of auto rides 
golf, night baseball, dance pavilions, amusemen 
parks, beaches, horse races, bridge, legitimat 
shows, opera, concerts, bowling, billiards, road 
houses. . . .?" 

The problems to be resolved are also trade prob 
lems, Mr. Kuykendall observes, declaring that th 
war has smothered grievances, but not solved them 
and that after the war they may be more trouble 
some. He then listed exhibitor problems, as fol 
lows : 

Excessive film prices, inflexible terms, percentage 
pictures, cooperative buying, overbuying, unreason- 
able clearance, arbitration and mediation, the music! 
tax, labor problems, readjustment of wartime 
scales, overseating, cut-rate competition, the for-: 
mation of a simplified standard exhibition contract, 
consent decrees, anti-trust decisions, admission 
taxes and unfair non-theatrical film competition. 

Arthur on Coast; May Delay 
Start of New Company 

Harry Arthur, Jr., general manager for Fanchon 
& Marco and organizer of the Exhibitors Distrib- 
uting Corporation, is in Hollywood to determine 
whether the plans for the new company will be 
completed now or will await the end of the warj 
• Mr. Arthur explained that the induction of his 
two brothers, who held key positions with Fan- 
chon & Marco, plus accumulated work in St 
Louis had prevented him from going to the West 
Coast for several weeks. On his last visit to New 
York this spring, he predicted that mid-summer 
would see the plans for the Exhibitors Distribut- 
ing Corporation well under way. 

But the delay, plus other factors, now raise the 
possibility that the plans might be deferred until 
after the war, he explained just before leaving for 
Hollywood. 



To Open French Films 

Three French films, completed before the war 
are to have their belated American premieres this 
season in New York. Herman G. Weinberg has 
completed the American adaptation and titles for 
"Derriere la Facade," to be called "32 Rue de 
Montmartre" ; "A Woman Disappears" and "Ex- 
tenuating Circumstances." 



New Theatre Approved 

Priorities for erection of a 400-seat theatre in 
war-booming Vallejo, Cal., have been obtained 
by Jesse and Ben Levin, and Ellis Levey. The trio 
operate the Rio in Richmond, Cal. The new 
Vallejo house, constructed in a remodelled store 
building, will operate 20 hours daily. 



40 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



9 & I 





GREAT SONGS! 

SWEET-HOI GIRL BAND! 
TEMPO-TERRIFIC DANCES! 

Laughs - U 




ced by Robert Fellows • Directed by Tim Whelan 

Screen Play by Warren Duff and Peter Milne 




FRANK SINATRA 

GEORGE MUMF 



DOLPHE MENJOU 



f 




GIORIA DE HAVE! 
WALTER S1EZAK 
EUGENE PAI1ETTE 

MLIYBR0M-A1AN CARNEY 

, 0 Or,n a OVOOc 





R K 




'what the 
picture dih fob 



. . . the original exhibitors' reports department, established October 14. 1916. In It 
theatremen serve one another with Information about the box-office performance of 
product — providing a service of the exhibitor for the exhibitor. ADDRESS REPORTS: 
What the Picture Did for Me, Motion Picture Herald. Rockefeller Center, New York 20. 



olumbia 

tEAUTIFUL BUT BROKE: Joan Davis, Jane Fra- 
[•— A very nice little comedy that pleased all and did 
nice business. Played Saturday, May 27. — W. C. 
31in, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

JEAUTIFUL BUT BROKE: Joan Davis, Jane Fra- 
• — Joan is popular here, so this did above average busi- 
es. Single billed on a Thursday-Friday change. Lots 

laughs in this one. And that's what they like in 
- town. Played Thursday. Friday, June 8. 9. — Arthur 

Phifield, Park Theatre, South Berwick, Maine. Small 
vn patronage. 

:OVER GIRL: Rita Hayworth, Gene Kelly— I did 
>re business on this one than I have ever done before 
a Columbia feature. It is a very good show and 
; Technicolor is marvelous. Played Sunday -Tuesday, 
ay 14-16— W. C. Fullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, 
Family patronage. 

;OVER GIRL: Rita Hayworth, Gene Kelly— Did nice 
siness. No sellout, but business above average. Was 
' very beautiful picture, and kept the boys on edge, 
kyed Monday, Tuesday, June 19, 20. — Harland Rankin, 
r.za Theatre, Tilbury, Crat. 

DESPERADOES: Randolph Scott, Glenn Ford— What 
picture. Magnificent outdoor scenery. A small town 
'tural if there ever was one. Flayed Thursday-Sat - 
day, June 8-10.— M. Bailey, Strand Theatre, Dryden, 
nada. Small town patronage. 

RACKET MAN, THE: Tom Neal, Jeannie Bates— 
l>od program picture for double bill. Played Friday, 
-urday, June 2, 3. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, 
lena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

5 WING OUT THE BLUES: Lynn Merrick, Bob 
iynes — Not much to it, but it brought in the business, 

what does it matter. Played Saturday. May 20. — W. 

Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patron- 



WHAT A WOMAN: Rosalind Russell, Brian Aherne 
Comments from patron : "I was disappointed in it, but 
was right good." Business was just average. Played 
inday. May 21. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, 
:iena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

WHAT A WOMAN: Rosalind Russell, Brian Aherne 
We did the best midweek business we have done in a 
g time on this feature. Rosalind Russell has never 
ne over big here, but this one surprised me. Played 
ednesday-Friday. Mar. 29-31.— W. C. Pullin, Linden 
leatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 



| <1etro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

| A GUY NAMED JOE: Spencer Tracy, Irene Dunne— 
I you have to beg Metro for it, by all means play it. 
Iiere aren't enough adjectives in the dictionary to de- 
Iribe this superb picture. It is certainly my choice for 
le best picture of the year. Business built up each night 
Id it set a record that will stand for a long time. Played 

mday-Tuesday, April 9-11.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Thea- 

:-. Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

A GUY NAMED JOE: Spencer Tracy, Irene Dunne— 
■me liked it and some didn't. Personally, I thought 
a good picture. Business was good first night, but 
! off second night. Flayed Wednesday, Thursday, May 
June 1. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena 
sta, Ga. Small town patronage. 

CRY HAVOC: Margaret Sullivan. Ann Sothern— Too 
any war features and they can't all do business. This 
is one of them that didn't. Played Wednesday-Fri- 
y, May 31, June 1, 2.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, 
>!umbus, O. Family patronage. 

jIRL CRAZY : Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland — Mickey 
xraey is still on the downgrade for me. He used to 
id the house record here but no more. Played Sunday- 
lesday, April 2-4.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Co- 
•~.nbus, O. Family patronage. 

LASSIE COME HOME: Roddy McDowall, Donald 

;sp — Played to the most people of any show I ever 
ayed. And I made more money on this feature than 

y ever shown here in five and a half years. It's tops 
1 every way, and a small town natural. Played Sunday, 
jonday, June 18. 19.— Arthur E. Phifield, Park Theatre, 

uth Berwick, Maine. Small town patronage. 

■LOST ANGEL: Margaret O'Brien, James Craig— This 
a very good picture, but for some unknown reason 
siness was below normal. Played Wednesday-Friday, 
ay 10-12.— W. C. Pullin. Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. 
imily patronage. 

RATIONING: Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main— Very 
tisfactory business and a very good feature. • Metro 
,Te has had some dandies this year for me. Played 
inday-Tuesday. April 30. Mav 1. 2.— W. C. Pullin, Lin- 
■n Theatre. Columbus, O. Family patronage. 



RATIONING: Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main— The kind 
of comedy that patrons want in small towns. Wallace 
Beery is always a draw here. Played Friday, Saturday, 
June 16, 17.— Leonard J. Leise, Rand Theatre, Randolph. 
Neb. Small town patronage. 

RATIONING: Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main— My pa- 
trons really enjoyed this comedy. It will give them lots 
of good laughs. Flay it bv all means. Played Monday, 
Tuesday, June 12, 13.— Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Thea- 
tre, Buena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

SWING FEVER: Kay Kyser, Marilyn Maxwell— Cute, 
a satisfactory midweek feature, nothing big, but can 
well stand on its own feet. Played Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, June 21, 22. — Leonard J. Leise, Rand Theatre, Ran- 
dolph, Neb. Small town patronage. 



Monogram 

MR. MUGGS STEPS OUT: East Side Kids— I don't 
know why, but the people flock in to see these kids. Per- 
sonally. I think if you see one of their features you have 
seen them all. Played Saturday, April IS. — W. C. Pullin, 
Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 



Paramount 

COMING 'ROUND THE MOUNTAIN: Gene Autry— 
Still doing a nice business on these Gene Autry reissues. 
Played Friday, Saturday, June 23, 24. — E. M. Freiburger, 
Paramount Theatre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patron- 
age. 

HENRY ALDRICH, BOY SCOUT: Jimmy Lydon, 
Charles Smith — Not bad, but not so good as some of the 
other pictures. Played Monday- Wednesday, June 12-14. — 
M. Bailey, Strand Theatre, Dryden, Canada. Small town 
patronage. 

MEMPHIS BELLE: War Documentary— This is one 
of the best pictures that has ever been made, a war 
picture that everyone thought they should see. — M. Bail- 
ey, Strand Theatre, Dryden, Canada. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

NO TIME FOR LOVE: Claudette Colbert, Fred Mac- 
Murray — Claudette Colbert never used to do much busi- 
ness. But, teamed with Fred MacMurray, the gross is 
rising with every picture. Played Sunday-Tuesday, April 
16-18.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Fam- 
ily patronage. 

RIDING HIGH: Dorothy Lamour, Dick Powell— Aver- 
age Sunday, Monday business. I expected it to be a 
bigger draw than it was. A very pleasing musical in 
Technicolor, nevertheless. Flayed Sunday, Monday, June 
4. 5.— Arthur E. Phifield, Park Theatre, South Berwick, 
Maine. Small town patronage. 

STANDING ROOM ONLY: Faulette Goddard, Fred 
MacMurray — Good enough farce comedy of life in Wash- 
ington, but business was light. Played Wednesday, 
Thursday, June 14, 15. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount 
Theatre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patronage. 

UNINVITED, THE: Ray Milland, Ruth Hussey— A 
mystery picture which pleased average business. Played 
Sunday, Monday, June 11, 12.— E. M. Freiburger, Para- 
mount Theatre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patronage. 



PRC 

JIVE JUNCTION: Dfckie Moore, Tina Thayer— Just 
,an average feature and business lower than that. One 
day was enough for it. Played Saturday. April 8. — W. C. 
Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 



RKO 

ADVENTURES OF A ROOKIE: Wally Brown, Alan 
Carney — Used on weekend double bill with very little suc- 
cess. Played Friday. Saturday, June 16, 17. — A. S. Ed- 
wards, Winema Theatre, Scotia, Cal. Small lumber town. 

GANGWAY FOR TOMORROW: John Carradine, Margo 
—Used on double bill with "Adventures of a Rookie." 
Fair business. Played Friday, Saturday. June 16. 17. — A. 
S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, Scotia, Cal. Small lumber 
town. 



IRON MAJOR, THE: Pat O'Brien, Ruth Warrick— 
Here's a football story that provides real entertainment. 
Particularly to those who have heard of or knew Frank 
Cavanaugh. Although not as good as "Pride of the Yan- 
kees" it made a hit with those that like this sort of pic- 
ture. This one won't sell out your house but people ap- 
preciate this sort of thing once in a while. Played Tues- 
day-Saturday, June 13-17.— Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical 
Department, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Small town 
patronage. 

LADDIE: Tim Holt, Virginia Gilmore— I brought this 
one back for a one -day showing and did very well. Some 
of these old ones are very good to repeat and you can 
make some money on them. Playeu Saturday, May 13. — 
W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family pat- 
ronage. 

NORTH STAR: Walter Huston, Anne Baxter — For 
good dramatics and plenty of human interest, this is it. 
Lots of propaganda but good acting and the story makes 
up for it. If anyone doubts the hardships that the Rus- 
sian peasants go through, tell them to look at this pic- 
ture. It shows you whatever you might want to know. 
Plenty of heavy drama and action for those who like that 
sort of thing. Played Tuesday-Sunday, June 6-11. — An- 
drew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Mountain, 
Wyoming. Small town patronage. 

PASSPORT TO DESTINY: Elsa Lancaster, Gordon 
Oliver — No star power and no business. Played Tuesday, 
June 20. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount Theatre, Dewey, 
Okla. Small town patronage. 

TENDER COMRADE: Ginger Rogers, Robert Ryan- 
Nice picture, but sad. Too many of these war pictures, 
and many walkouts, who couldn't take it. Plaved Wednes- 
day, Thursday, June 21, 22.— Harland Rankin, Plaza Thea- 
tre, Tilbury, Ont. 



Republic 

DEERSLAYER, THE: Jean Farker, Bruce Kellogg— A 
very nice feature for a one-day showing that pleased all, 
including me, as the gross was up about 10 per cent over 
normal. Played Saturday, April 22.— W. C. Pullin, Lin- 
den Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

FIGHTING SEABEES: John Wayne, Susan Hayworth 
— A very fine film of the Seabees in action. Pleased all 
who saw it and the gross was satisfactory. Played 
Wednesday-Friday, April 26-28.— W. C. Pullin, Linden 
Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

LADY AND THE MONSTER: Richard Arlen, Vera 
Ralston — Republic's effort to make a full length chiller 
diller failed to click. Business was very light. Payed 
Wednesday, Thursday, June 21, 22.— E. M. Freiburger, 
Paramount Theatre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patronage. 

MY BEST GAL: Jane Withers, Jimmy Lydon— This 
picture was really good for weekend trade. Some patrons 
said they did not know Henry Aldrich could play anything 
but the bad boy. Played Friday, Saturday, June 16, 17.— 
Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena Vista, Ga. 
Small town patronage. 

MY BEST GAL: Jane Withers, Jimmy Lydon— Nice 
little feature that did surprisingly well. Played Saturday, 
May 6.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. 
Family patronage. 

O, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE: Frank Albertson, 
Lorna Grey — A very nice one-day picture that did better 
than average at the box office. Played Saturday, April 
1. — W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family 
patronage. 

ROSIE THE RIVETER: Jane Frazee, Frank Albertson 
—A very pleasing little comedy that satisfied the patrons 
and they were plenty. Played Saturday, June 3. — W. C. 
F'ullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

TUCSON RAIDERS: Bill Elliott, Bobby Blake— This 
first of the Red Ryder series drew the usual number of 
adults and more than usual kids. It pleased. Played 
Friday, Saturday. June 16, 17. — E. M. Freiburger, Para- 
mount Theatre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patronage. 



Twentieth Century- Fox 

BOMBER'S MOON: George Montgomery, Annabella— 
This one was not as good as we had hoped. Just an 
(Continued on following page) 



OTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



45 



{Continued from preceding page) 
average sort of picture with an average sort of story. 
Nothing particularly good. Flayed Tuesday-Sunday, June 
6-11.— Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart 
Mountain, Wyoming. Small town patronage. 

GANG'S ALL HERE: Alice Faye, Carmen Miranda— 
Not quite average business on this one but still satis- 
factory. Played Sunday-Tuesday, Mar. 26-28— W. C. Pul- 
lin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

HAPPY LAND: Don Ameche, Frances Dee— Personally, 
I thought this a very good feature. But business was way 
down for some reason. I can't understand show business 
after all these years. Played Wednesday-Friday, May 
24-26.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, 0. Fam 
ily patronage. 

HEAVEN CAN WAIT: Don Ameche, Gene Tierney— A 
big flop from the standpoint of my box office. Don Ameche 
never a drawing card here. Pleased the few who saw it. 
Played Tuesday, Wednesday, June 6, 7.— Arthur E. Phi- 
field, Fark Theatre, South Berwick, Maine. Small town 
patronage. 

LIFEBOAT: Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix — It 
surely didn't cost 20th-Fox much to make this one as all 
of the action takes place in a lifeboat. It lags and lacks 
interest and the business showed it. Played Sunday- 
Tuesday, May 7-9.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Colum- 
bus, O. Family patronage. 

PURPLE HEART, THE: Dana Andrews, Richard 
Conte — This one fell down but not too bad. It seemed to 
please those who saw it, but nothing to rave about. 
Played Sunday-Tuesday, May 21-23.— W. C. Pullin, Lin- 
den Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

STORMY WEATHER: Lena 'Home, Bill Robinson— 1 
booked this before Christmas and then canceled. But if 
you have small town patrons to back your show, play this 
picture and your box office will satisfy you. Very few 
white patrons, and no comments from them. Played 
Monnday, Tuesday, May 29, 30.— Cleo Manry, Buena Vista 
Theatre, Buena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

SULLIVANS, THE: Anne Baxter, Thomas Mitchell— 
This is one swell story of the fighting Sullivans. Busi- 
ness was not what I expected but still very good. Played 
Sunday-Tuesday, May 28-30.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Thea- 
tre, Columbus, O. 

WINTERTIME: Sonja Henie, Jack Oakie — Business 
was good, but there were many complaints. This defi- 
nitely was the weakest picture we have ever showed in 
which this great little artist was cast. Played Sunday, 
Monday, June 18, 19. — A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, 
Scotia, Cal. Small town patronage. 



United Artists 



JACK LONDON: Michael O'Shea, Susan Hay ward— 1 
thought it was a good picture, but it sure didn't say so 
at the box office. People just stayed home the second 
and third days. Played Thursday-Saturday, June 15-17.— 
M. Bailey, Strand Theatre, Dryden, Canada. Small town 
patronage. 

KNICKERBOCKER HOLIDAY: Nelson Eddy, Charles 
Coburn — One of my patrons who is a lover of Nelson Eddy 
made this comment, "If this is the type picture they are 
going to give Nelson Eddy, then they better let him flop." 
One said, "I have seen worse pictures but not with Nelson 
Eddy in it." Box office disappointment. Played Sunday, 
June 11. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena Vista, 
Ga. Small town patronage. 

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN: Cheryl Walker, William 
Terry — We played this late, but to good business. Some 
of the numbers composing the many in the picture should 
have been eliminated, thus cutting out the excess length. 
Even with a minimum of shorts the program was too 
long. Flayed Wednesday, Thursday, June 16, 17. — A. S. 
Edwards, Winema Theatre, Scotia, Cal. Small lumber 
town. 

VICTORY THROUGH AIR POWER: Disney aviation 
feature — A cluck if there ever was one. It pleased about 
50 percent of those that came to see it, but business was 
terrible, in fact the worst in many months. I double- 
billed it with a pretty good feature, too, but no business. 
Played Thursday-Saturday. May 25-27. — K. A. Spears, 
Roxy Theatre, Winlock, Washington. Small town pat- 
ronage. 



Universal 



ALI BABA AND THE 40 THIEVES: Jon Hall, Maria 
Montez — This picture was something different that did 
average business. Good comments. Played Sunday, Mon- 
day, June 18, 19. — Leonard J. Leise, Rand Theatre, Ran- 
dolph, Neb. Small town patronage. 

ALI BABA AND THE 40 THIEVES— Jon Hall, Maria 
Montez — Beautiful picture and pleased well. Business was 
about average for this change. Played Sunday-Wednes- 
day, June 11-14. — K. A. Spears, Roxy Theatre, Winlock, 
Washington. Small town patronage. 

CORVETTE K-225: Randolph Scott, James Brown— A 
very nice feature for a midweek presentation. Business 
slightly above average. Played Wednesday-Friday, May 
17-19.— W. C. Pullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Fam- 
ily patronage. 

FIRED WIFE: Robert Paige, Louise Allbritton — A 
swell comedy. It sure gets the laughs. Well produced and 
directed. Business was good. Played Thursday-Satur- 
day, June 15-17.— K. A. Spears, Roxy Theatre, Winlock, 
Washington. Small town patronage. 

FLESH AND FANTASY: Edward G. Robinson, Charles 
Boyer — Personally I didn't care for this feature at all. It 



SHORT PRODUCT 
PLAYING BROADWAY 

Week of July 3 

ASTOR 

Movie Pests MGM 

City of Brigham Young MGM 

Feature: Bathing Beauty MGM 

CRITERION 

Foster's Canary College Univ. 

Feature: Christmas Holiday .... Univ. 

GLOBE 

Thugs with Dirty Mugs Vitaphone 

Feature: The Hairy Ape United Artists 

GOTHAM 

Duck Soup to Nuts Vitaphone 

Feature: Dead End Warner Bros. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Russian Rhapsody Vitaphone 

Our Frontier in Italy Vitaphone 

Winner's Circle Vitaphone 

Feature: Mr. Skeffington Warner Bros. 

MUSIC HALL 

Back Door to Tokyo 20th Cent.- Fox 

Boots and Spurs RKO Radio 

Feature: Once Upon a Time. . . . Columbia 

PARAMOUNT 

And to Think I Saw It on Mul- 
berry Street Paramount 

Trail Breakers Paramount 

Unusual Occupations Paramount 

Feature: Going My Way Paramount 

RIALTO 

How to Fish RKO Radio 

Henpecked Rooster Paramount 

Amphibious Fighters Paramount 

Feature: The Mummy's Ghost. . Universal 

RIVOLI 

Your Pet Problem Paramount 

Feature: Story of Dr. Wassell . . Paramount 

ROXY 

Eliza on the Ice 20th Cent.-Fox 

Nymphs of the Lake 20th Cent.-Fox 

Somewhere in U.S. A MGM 

Feature: Home in Indiana 20th Cent.-Fox 

STRAND 

Winner's Circle Vitaphone 

Filipino Sports Parade Vitaphone 

Angel Puss Vitaphone 

Feature: The Mask of Dimitrios . Warner Bros. 



was a big surprise at the box office as it went over big. 
Played Wednesday-Friday, May 3-5.— W. C. Pullin, Lin- 
den Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

FLESH AND FANTASY: Charles Boyer, Barbara 
Stanwyck — When people heard about this, they clamored 
for it; but once they saw it they didn't care for it. Every- 
body says that the first two stories were good, but the 
one with Charles Boyer was no good. Not as good as 
everyone thought it would be. Played Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, June 7, 8. — Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Depart- 
ment, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. General patronage. 

GUNG HO: Randolph Scott, Grace McDonald— Business 
just a shade below normal, but no fault of the picture. It 
is very good. Played Sunday-Tuesday, April 23-25. — W. 
C. F'ullin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family pat- 
ronage. 

HERE COMES ELMER: Al Pearce and His Gang- 
Very suitable weekend picture. Played Friday, Saturday, 
June 23, 24— Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont. 

HIS BUTLER'S SISTER: Deanna Durbin, Fat O'Brien 
— Good picture, but only fair business. Too much opera 
singing for a small town. Played Sunday, Monday, June 
18, 19. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount Theatre, Dewey, 
Okla. Small town patronage. 

MAD GOUHL, THE: Evelyn Ankers, David Bruce— 
This small horror picture got by on Pal Night. Played 
Tuesday, June 13.— E. M. Freiburger, Paramount Thea- 
tre, Dewey, Okla. Small town patronage. 

MOONLIGHT IN VERMONT: Gloria Jean, Fay Helm 

—Business just average and so is the picture. No com- 
plaints. Played Saturday, April 29.— W. C. Pullin, Lin- 
den Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

SON OF DRACULA: Lon Chaney, Louise Allbritton— 
Didn't do as well on this as we generally do on thriller 
features here. Business off about 20 percent. Played 



Wednesday-Friday, April 12-14.— W. C. Pullin, Lindet'j 
Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

TOP MAN: Donald O'Connor, Peggy Ryan— A goot 
show that pleased generally and especially the youngei 
set. Business was good. Played Thursday -Saturday 
June 1-3.— K. A. Spears, Roxy Theatre, Winlock, Wash 
ington. Small town patronage. 

TOP MAN : Donald O'Connor, Peggy Ryan— In a gooc 
feature I can always depend on this boy to do a nice mid 
week business. And this is a good picture. Playec j 
Wednesday-Friday, April 19-21.— W. C. Pullin, Linde: j 
Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 

WE'VE NEVER BEEN LICKED: Noah Beery, Jr.; 
Richard Quine — Double-billed this with "Pistol Packin j 
Mama" to just average business. Picture nothing to raw. 
about. Played Wednesday -Friday, April 5-7. — W. C. Pulffl 
lin, Linden Theatre, Columbus, O. Family patronage. 



Warner Bros. 

DESTINATION TOKYO: Cary Grant, John Garfield- I 
This picture was a slight disappointment to me. Whil< I 
it pleased generally and did about average business, w( | 
expected much more than that. The picture would hav<| 
been much better if it were 30 minutes shorter as it is | 
draggy in many places. Played Sunday-Wednesday, Majj 
28-31. — K. A. Spears, Roxy Theatre, Winlock, Washing. I 
ton. Small town patronage. 

NORTHERN PURSUIT: Errol Flynn, Julie Bishop— Aj 
good picture and many good comments. Many comments |l 
about the snow, the weather. So hot made the patrons! 
feel cool at least with the fan on. Played Wednesday,! 
Thursday, June 14, 15. — Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Thea- 
tre, Buena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 



Short Features 
Columbia 

CRASH GOES THE HASH: All Star Comedies— Thes| 
comedians (The Three Stooges) always please. This on«i 
is above average. — Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Depart- 
ment, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. 

THE BATMAN: World of Sports— Just finished play- 
ing this serial and would rate it one of the best serials 
I've used in past two years. — Arthur E. Fhifield, Park 
Theatre, South Berwick, Maine. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ELECTION DAZE: Our Gang— There isn't much ti 
this Our Gang comedy, but my Saturday crowd was 
pleased, so play it. — Arthur E. Fhifield, Park Theatre^ 
South Berwick, Maine. 

GRAND CANYON— PRIDE OF CREATION: Fitzpat- 

rick Traveltalks — One of the most beautiful scenes ever 
made. — Arthur E. Phifield, Park Theatre, South Berwick, 
Maine. 



Paramount 

LULU IN HOLLYWOOD: Little Lulu— Good color car- 
toon. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount Theatre, Okla. 

MARRY-GO-ROUND: Popeye the Sailor— My firsfl 
Popeye in color. The Technicolor does help a lot and this] 
one seemed to please all. — Arthur E. Phifield, Park Thea- 
tre, South Berwick, Maine. 

ON THE WAY TO RIO: Fopeye the Sailor— Good' 
color cartoon. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount Theatre, 
Dewey, Okla. 

WINGED COURIERS: Sportlights — Good sport reel 
about carrier pigeons. — E. M. Freiburger, Paramount 
Theatre, Dewey, Okla. 



RKO 

HARRIS IN THE SPRING: Headliner Revivals— Fairly 
good two- reel musical. Print was in bad shape. — E. M. 
Freiburger, Paramount Theatre, Dewey, Okla. 

STARS AND STRIKES: Sportscope— Hints and tips on 
bowling, plus some excellent shots on "how the expert 
does it." With some amusing spots on "how the ama- 
teur does it." Very entertaining and educational. — An- 
drew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Mountain, 
Wyoming. 

Twentieth Century- Fox 

JUNGLE LAND: Dribble Puss Parade— One of thf 
"Dribble Puss Parade" series. Just about as entertaining 
as the others, but have seen some better ones. — Andrew 
Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Mountain, 
Wyoming. 



u 



niversal 



TRUMPET SERENADE: Name band musicals— An- 
other one of Universal's excellent musical shorts. Some 
of the songs are not familiar but people enjoyed them 
anyway. A very good short for use at any time. Harry 
Tames" is well known here so his music goes over well.— 
Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Moun- 
tain, Wyoming. 



46 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



NTERTAINMENT 



PPEARED 

IN 

00« 



|F THE 

Ration's 

SCREENS 

H CELEBRATION 
)F M-G-M's 

twenty year 
Anniversary 





The final returns are in. History 
has been written. Every regularly 
operated motion picture theatre 
in the nation, of which there is 
a record, has flashed the M-G-M 
Lion on its screen during the 
Friendly Company's Anniversary 
Week. Never an industry in the 
world until now in which every 
outlet has thus honored one 
product. With humility and grati- 
tude M-G-M thanks this industry 
of which it is proud to be a part. 

EVERY THEATRE: FREE MOVIE DAY, JULY 6th! 
"THE FIGHTING FIFTH" VICTORY CLIMAX! 



P I C T U RE ^ statistical compilation and 

comparison of Box-Office Per- 
formance in first-run theatres 



CROSSES 



Figures directly below picture title compare dollar gross with average gross and show rela- 
tive percentage of ail engagements tabulated. 

Figures opposite theatre names represent percentage of tabulated grosses to average weekly 
business based on the six months' period ending April 30, 1944. 

SYMOLS: (DB) Double Bill— associate feature title; (SA) Stage Attraction; (MO) Move-Over 
Run; (AA) Advance Admission. 

INDEX: Over-all performance percentage figures from previously published final reports 
appear in Service Data section of Product Digest. See last column of Release Chart for Index. 



CASLICHT (MCM) 

Final Reports: 



Total Gross Tabulated $805,500 
Comparative Average Gross 797,200 
Over-all Performance 101.0% 



BALTIMORE— Century, 1st week 128.5% 

BALTIMORE — Century, 2nd week 91.4% 

BOSTON— Orpheum, 1st week 100.4% 

BOSTON— Orpheum, 2nd week 120.0% 

BOSTON— State, 1st week 76.9% 

BOSTON— State, 2nd week 97.9% 

BUFFALO — Buffalo 94.6% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Capitol, 1st week .... 97.9% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Capitol, 2nd week . . . 82.4% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Capitol, 3rd week .... 64.9% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's State 109.3% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's Stillman, MO 1st week . 111.5% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's Stillman, MO 2nd week . 83.3% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's Ohio, MO' 3rd week . . 110.0% 

INDIANAPOLIS— Loew's, 1st week 109.7% 

INDIANAPOLIS— Loew's 2nd week 65.0% 

KANSAS CITY— Midland 86.7% 

MINNEAPOLIS— State, 1st week 115 7% 

MINNEAPOLIS— State, 2nd week 57.8% 

MINNEAPOLIS— Lyric, MO 1st week .... 107.8% 

NEW YORK— Capitol, 1st week 127.8% 

(SA) Phil Spitalny's All Girl Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Capitol, 2nd week 97.5% 

(SA) Phil Spitalny's All Girl Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Capitol, 3rd week 95.0% 

(SA) Phil Spitalny's All Girl Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Capitol, 4th week 87.0% 

(SA) Phil Spitalnv's All Girl Orchestra 

OMAHA— Paramount 86.9% 

PHILADELPHIA— Boyd, 1st week 139.4% 

PHILADELPHIA— Boyd, 2nd week 115.3% 

PITTSBURGH— Penn 96.8% 

PITTSBURGH— Warner, MO 1st week .... 102.2% 

PITTSBURGH— Warner, MO 2nd week .... 73.4% 

PITTSBURGH— Ritz, MO 3rd week 116.6% 

PITTSBURGH— Ritz, MO 4th week 100.0% 

PROVIDENCE— Loew's State, 1st week .... 168.5% 

PROVIDENCE— Loew's State, 2nd week .... 67.4% 

SAN FRANCISCO-Fox 125.0% 

(DB) Trocadero (Rep.) 

ST. LOUIS— Loew's State, 1st week 86.0% 

ST. LOUIS— Loew's State, 2nd week 59.1% 

ST. LOUIS— Loew's Orpheum, MO 1st week . . 89.0% 

TORONTO— Loew's 135.0% 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Palace, 1st week . . . 115.0% 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Palace, 2nd week . . . 97.5% 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Palace, 3rd week . . . 80.0% 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Columbia, MO 1st week 106.2% 



THE WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER (MCM) 

Intermediate Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $1,137,800 
Comparative Average Gross 990,500 
Over-all Performance 114.8% 



BALTIMORE— Century 128.5% 

BUFFALO— Great Lakes, 1st week 120.0% 

BUFFALO— Great Lakes, 2nd week 97.1% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Capitol 144.3% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's State, 1st week .... 130.2% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's State, 2nd week .... 114.5% 

KANSAS CITY— Midland 150.2% 

LOS ANGELES— Egyptian 194.1% 

LOS ANGELES— Los Angeles 226.7% 

LOS ANGELES— Ritz 179.5% 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 1st week 113.2% 

(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 2nd week ..... 114.1% 

(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 3rd week ..... 117.9% 
(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 4th week 105.6% 

(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 5th week 103.8% 



(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 



NEW YORK— Music Hall, 6th week ..... 96.2% 
(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

NEW YORK— Music Hall, 7th week 94.3% 

(SA) Radio City Music Hall Stage Presentation 

PHILADELPHIA— Stanley 160.0% 

PITTSBURGH— Penn 136.1% 

PROVIDENCE— Loew's State 123.5% 

ST LOUIS— Loew's State 123.6% 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Palace 115.0% 

• 

HOME IN INDIANA < 20th- Fox > 

First Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $333,700 
Comparative Average Gross 311,300 
Over-all Performance 107.1% 

CINCINNATI— Palace 121.7% 

CINCINNATI-RKO Grand 103.8% 

CLEVELAND— Allen, 1st week 146.3% 

CLEVELAND— Allen, 2nd week 150.0% 

INDIANAPOLIS— Indiana 132.8% 

(DB) Pardon My Rhvthm (Univ.) 

INDIANAPOLIS— Lyric 115.4% 

(DB) Pardon My Rhythm (Univ.) 

LOS ANGELES— Carthay Circle 88.4% 

(DB) Three Men in White (MGM) 

LOS ANGELES— Chinese 93.4% 

(DB) Three Men in White (MGM) 

LOS ANGELES— Loew's State 104.1% 

(DB) Three Men in White (MGM) ■ 

LOS ANGELES— Uptown 96.2% 

(DB) Three Men in White (MGM) 

NEW YORK— Roxy, 1st week 103.5% 

(SA) Enric Madriguera's Orchestra, others 

NEW YORK— Roxy, 2nd week 101.1% 

(SA) Enric Madriguera's Orchestra, others 

PITTSBURGH— Fulton 104.6% 

PROVIDENCE— Majestic 125.9% 

(DB) Casanova in Burlesque (Rep.) 



MAKE YOUR OWN BED (WB) 

First Reports: 



Total Gross Tabulated $157,000 
Comparative Average Gross 155,100 
Over-all Performance 101.2% 



BALTIMORE— Stanley 88.7% 

CINCINNATI — Lyric 108.7% 

(DB) Yellow Canary (Wilcox-RKO) 

NEW YORK— Strand, 1st week 106.5% 

(SA) Cab Calloway's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Strand, 2nd week 80.4% 

(SA) Cab Calloway's Orchestra 

PITTSBURGH— Stanley 143.5% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

WASHINGTON— Earle 101.4% 

(SA) Vaudeville 



THE EVE OF ST. MARK (20th-Fox) 

First Reports: 



Total Gross Tabulated $91,700 
Comparative Average Gross 92,000 
Over-all Performance 99.6% 



BALTIMORE— New, 1st week 105.9% 

BALTIMORE— New, 2nd week 110.1% 

BUFFALO— Buffalo 101.6% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th-Fox) 

KANSAS CITY— Esquire 97.1% 

KANSAS CITY— Uptown 82.8% 

MILWAUKEE— Wisconsin . . . : 91.7% 

(DB) Ladies of Washington (20th-Fox) 

PHILADELPHIA— Fox 100.4% 



Warners in Tribute to 
Shipbuilders at Launching 

Addressing a crowd that witnessed the launcri 
of the S. S. Benjamin Warner, named in honol 
the father of the Warner Brothers, at Henry K 
er's Permanente Metal Corporation yards at R , 
mond, Cal., July 1, Harry M. and Colonel J 
L. Warner paid tribute to the builders of j 
American merchant marine and the personnel \ 
are manning the ships. 

"Benjamin Warner knew the meaning of libel 
better than we can know it because he had the j 
ter experience of oppression," said Harry Wan 
"On his behalf I want to pay tribute to you gall 
men and women who have built this ship, to 
officers and men who will sail her, and to the br 
men living and dead who have carried the mater 
of victory to the fighting fronts." 

Colonel Warner said, in part: "To the Libe ; 
Ships, the shipyards and the merchant marine 
owe an everlasting debt of gratitude. For it w 
they who made it possible for this country to ov 
come the handicaps of 'too little and too late' i 
to carry our full might to the enemy." 

Henry Kaiser also paid tribute to the ship wo 
ers and the man whose name is carried by 
519th and final Liberty Ship to be turned out 
this yard. "Benjamin Warner's life," he se 
"was a monument to the ideals which make Am 
ica the symbol of freedom and opportunity." 

Buffalo Variety Club to 
Hold Dance July 17 

Plans are being completed for the annual su 
mer dinner dance and field day'of the Variety CI 
of Buffalo, to be held July 17 at the Automot 
Club in nearby Clarence. The committees for 1 
affair follow: Arrangements, Ralph W. Maw, ] 
mer F. Lux, Robert T. Murphy ; music and < 
tertainment, Murray Whiteman, Harry Altm:, 
Dewey Michaels and George J. Gammel ; ticke 
Ira Cohn, Manny Woronov, Leo Murphy, Mi; 
Simon, Abraham T. Harris ; publicity, Charles 
Taylor, W. E. J. Martin, Foster Brooks, John 
Chinell and James F. Schrader ; gin rummy, M 
Yellen, Gus Basil and Jack Goldstein ; priz 
George Mackenna, Irving Fried, Albert Beck 
Emerson Dickman, Joseph Fox, Samuel Goldbei 
Marvin Jacobs and E. M. Michaels ; games, PI 
Fox, Samuel Yellen, Spencer Baiser, Arth 
Bailey, Myron Gross, Sidney Cohen, Menno Dy 
stra and Marvin Atlas. 



Ziemer Joins OWI 

Gregor Ziemer, author of the book, "Educatii 
for Death," from which the picture, "Hitlei 
Children" was adopted, has been appointed to t 
Office of War Information, it was announced 1 
Stations WLW and WSAI, in Cincinnati, < 
which Mr. Ziemer has been a news commentate 
His headquarters will be in London, and his duti 
will include broadcasting in German to the Ge 
man people. 



Buys Columbus Auditorium 

The F. & R. Lazarus, a Columbus, Ohio, d 
partment store, has purchased the Columbus Aud 
torium, previously used for various types of ente 
tainment, conventions and similar activities. N 
announcement has been made as to the future u: 
of the structure by the purchasers who will remod 
it. The purchase price is said to have bee 
$175,000. 



Fined for Blocked Exits 

On charges filed by John E. Jordan, of tl 
Fire Prevention Squad, William Pabcake, manag< 
of the Knickerbocker, downtown subsequent rr. 
house in Columbus, Ohio, was fined $25 and cos 
for failure to have exits indicated with illuminate 
signs. Costs were suspended on charges of failir 
to keep a stairway lighted and having a stairwa 
obstructed by a ladder. 



Resumes Columbia Post 

Si Bell, inducted into the Army several wee! 
ago and later honorably discharged, returned < 
the Columbia exchange in Philadelphia, taking u 
his duties again as film salesman. Sidney Sugai 
man, who succeeded him, has been transferred t 
the Washington exchange. 



48 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 194 




An international association of showmen meeting weekly 
n MOTION PICTURE HERALD for mutual aid and progress 



HESTER FRIEDMAN, Editor 



Exploitation 

f "Increased Exploitation Activities" was the keynote sounded by 
oR. W. Bolstad, vice-president of Famous Players-Canadian theatres 
fet a convention of managers last week. 

Addressing the circuit's western managers "in Banff Springs, 
:3 Alberta, Mr. Bolstad declared that the end of the war boom is 
|n sight. He urged augmented exploitation activities, in view of 
ndications that a business recession is already being felt in some 
sections of Canada. 

There have been indications and in some quarters definite 
• reports that business has been declining in this country, too. Last 
fjVeek, for instance, one theatreman told us that his office was not 
atisfied with receipts of late. His theatre is located in the nearest 
:ity to one of the largest army camps in the east. There has been 
no appreciable change in drawing potentialities. 

There are, of course, two prominent reasons which may be 
«expounded for a sudden let-up in business — desultory weather and 
:the invasion. 

The calibre of product presently being released by the film 
companies is above average. Adherence to Mr. Bolstad's advice 
jfor greater accent on exploitation is undoubtedly the finest remedy 
jv/here any business decline exists. 

AAA 



GERTRUDE MERRIAM. Associate Editor 



OP 



Showman King 



Another Quarter in the Quigley Awards competition has 
i slipped. by. For the fourth time in succession the Awards Judges 
Phave bestowed a Silver Plaque upon James J. King, publicity 
* director for the RKO Boston theatre in Boston. 

It is more than coincidence that Mr. King should win this signal 
honor four times running. Undoubtedly, it is indicative of unusual 
j skill in a highly specialized field in competition with other skilled 
I showmen. 

The Quarterly Awards are made on the same basis as those 
i of the Annual Grand Awards — promotional activity backed by con- 
J sistency of effort. 

Three of the Awards Judges are invited to appraise the offer- 
ings at each quarterly judging. Since a different group has made 
the selections for each of the quarters, it is apparent that these 
men are objective in their decisions. 

Incidentally, these various committees have consistently dis- 



counted in their decisions all assistance extended by the dis- 
tributors' field men in exploiting a film. ^ " 

In 1943 Mr. King was not active in the competition until the 
last half of the year. While he was awarded top honors in the 
last two periods for 1943, he did not register in the Grand Awards 
competition. 

In addition to possessing the inventive imagination necessary 
to a good exploiteer, Mr. King does not hesitate to adapt for his 
own purpose any idea he deems practical. 

This is illustrated by the fact that in recent months he has 
obtained dozens of free displays for his attractions by promoting 
star cuts and film and theatre credits in merchant display ads in 
the local papers. 

One would suppose that this form of tieup was more available 
in the smaller communities where it first originated. But Mr. King 
works in the great city of Boston. 

Here may be the answer to those who believe that the specialist 
engaged in advertising and publicity endeavor in large cities has 
more opportunity than the theatre manager who has operational 
details to handle in addition to advertising. 

If Mr. King can devise a campaign composed of original ideas 
plus those of others, surely there is no reason why a manager in 
another city or town cannot do it too. 

We might also point out once again that in the larger cities 
newspaper cooperation is more difficult to get than in the smaller 
communities. 

Any notion that chances are limited to theatre size is entirely 
unfounded. 

AAA' <• 

It Happens These Days 

Boyd Sparrow, manager of Loew's theatre in Indianapolis, was 
relating the story of a hillbilly patron. 

Sparrow first noticed the man after he had purchased an admis- 
sion ticket three different times within a space of five minutes at 
the box office. 

The fourth time the hillbilly approached the ticket box Sparrow 
accosted him and demanded to know whyfore. "Well," drawled 
the lanky mountaineer, "every time I hand my ticket to the feller 
at the door, the dern fool tears it in half." 

—CHESTER FRIEDMAN 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



49 



SOME SHOWMEN TACTICS 





In Boston, local girls were asked to submit their own "pin-up" photos, whi< 
were mailed to service men in overseas combat zones. Idea was Har 
Greenman's, manager of the Orpheum, and tied in with showing of "Two Gii 
and a Sailor". 



Frumkin Studio 



Leo Rosen, manager of the Strand, Albany, N. Y., 
used this huge cutout figure on the upright sign to 
plug the engagement of "Up in Mabel's Room". 




BBS* 





At right, a fas- 
cinating layout 
was built around 
"The Adventures 
of Mark Twain" 
in the window of 
one of Kansas 
City's largest de- 
partment stores 
in conjunction 
with film's en- 
gagement at the 
Orpheum the- 
atre. 




"Underground Guerrillas" street ballyhoo 
was used by Bill Brown, manager of the 
Bijou, New Haven, Conn. 



In connection with the 
opening of "Berna- 
dette" at the Para- 
mount, Des Moines, 
publicity director Dale 
McFarland of Tri-States 
gave special attention 
to the front, pictured 
here. Campaign in- 
cluded press, radio, 
street car and bus ad- 
vertising. 





50 



^# t [ 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 194 




"Okay, Mr. Exhibitor, I've 
made a Short Subject about 
movie pests and how they 
annoy the audience. It's all 
in fun but it's a message every 
showman has wanted to get 
over to the customers for years!" 



PETE 
SMITH 

answers the 
exhibitors' prayers 
with M-G-M's 



MOVIE PESTS 

A MERRY "MUST" FOR EVERY THEATRE! 




Charles P. Skouras, President 
National Theatres: 

"One of the best subjects you have ever 
produced . . . packed with laughs ... as far 
as I am concerned, this reel is a MUST!" 

Hedda Hopper, Columnist: 

"I've never heard so many laughs in such 
a short film." 

fjffsfa ANNIVERSARY 



Besa Short, Interstate Circuit 
shorts chief: 

"Destined to be one of the important 
film properties of this or any other age." 

Terry Ramsaye, Editor of Motion Picture Herald : 

"This picture says something that every 
exhibitor has had on his mind since 
movies were born." 

SHORT FOR LONG RUNS! 



Keep selling those war bonds! Fight by the side of the troops who never stop! 



M-C-M 20th ANNIVERSARY 

was the occasion for numerous promotions. 
Here are illustrated three of the devices em- 
ployed. Theatre exploitation for current War 
Bond and recent WAC drives is represented. 




A huge birthday cake was part of Jack Foxe's lobby 
display at the Loew theatre in Richmond. 




Above, Joe Samartano, manager of the State, Providence, arranged a parade 
and demonstration; below, Tom Delbridge created this novel display over the 
entrance doors at Loew's Nashville, Tenn. 





A novel stunt ar- 
ranged by A. J. 
Coffey, which 
tied in with WAC 
drive, had the 
mayor of Hickory, 
N. C, peeling 
potatoes in de- 
partment store 
window. "See 
Here, Pvt. Har- 
grove", current 
film fare at Caro- 
lina theatre, came 
in for fine plug. 



*« * •* ■ : ' * ' ' ' * 




join 



BUYABOHO 

AnoHonoR 

YOUR HERO 



Bp Si 



* THE MORE BOnDS THE FEWER 61 



LET'S GO 
NEIGHBORS 




>3 C 



. i.- THE 'nvOSipnjEflCH-HERDS ORE TOUGH GOIDS / 

BE ODD YOU'RE ALIVE " 
/ 





WAR LOM 



VALLEY STREAM'S 
QUOTA ' 

800.000. 



WE CPIVWE WILL 
WE MUST 




Photos of local service men, used on a rotating system, are displayed in lobby by 
Ben Mindlin, manager of Century's Valley Stream theatre on Long Island, N. Y., to 
press Bond sales. 



52 



.-Mac* 



By Joseph R. Marcello 

Manager Al Clarke, Fay's Majestic, Providence, 
R. I., utilized two stock 40 by 60 displays for an 
effective background behind lobby Bond booth. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



Exploiting the New Films 



How the recent pictures are being sold at 
the first run and pre-release date showings 



YHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER 

Stephen Toth, assistant manager at the Val- 
tine theatre in Toledo, came through with 
sother fine exploitation campaign for "White 
'iffs of Dover" during manager Ted Tesch- 
t's vacation period. 

Highlight of the campaign was a special ad- 
nce screening which was attended by 350 
presentatives of the newspaper press, radio 
id drama critics, civic leaders and the prin- 
)als of all Toledo public schools. 
Newspaper publicity for the attraction was 
atifying, the Times breaking five separate 
iture stories and art layouts, including a 
read on the fashion page Sunday before the 
ening. The Toledo Blade also came through 
th feature breaks and critic Mitch Woodbury 
vored the picture with a "rave" review ten 
ys prior to the opening. 
Additional news and feature stories landed 

the pages of the Campus Collegian, Toledo 
wish Times, Union Leader, American Echo, 
Polish daily, and 20 weeklies in out of town 
ots covering a 40 mile radius. 
Radio advertising included 19 paid and gratis 
.nouncements over WSPD and 29 spot an- 
•uncements on WTOL beginning six days 

ead of opening. 

utdoor Billing Includes Use of 
osters, Truck Snipes 

Outdoor billing consisted of 150 jumbo win- 
iw cards posted in the city's leading defense 
ants, two 8-sheets which were posted oppo- 
:e one of the largest war plants, 42 Railway 
xpress trucks which carried posters sniped 
lith theatre and playdate signs, banners on 
1 1 Buckeye news trucks and the Eastern Dry 
' eaners fleet of delivery trucks, plus 42 inch 
r cards which were carried by the city's 
ansportation system two weeks in advance. 
Bookmarks were imprinted and distributed 





VJSR JUNE 22 -MAJESTIC 

Shpt, «d met A**. Wm.™t fl CQPD „f jL. \ 

MAN FROM FRISCO' 

THE LOVES -THE BATTLES - THE TRIUMPHS" 
CrfTitt M« «xl Womb Wko BoUJOuf SJiijw 



WITH 

MICHAEL O'SHEA - ANN SHIRLEY 

GENE LOCKHART • STEPHANE BACHELOR 





Fojcr hundred grocery stores in Houston, Texas, displayed these counter easels calling attention 
to the engagement of "Man from 'Frisco" at the Majestic theatre. Jack Jackson arranged the 
tieup with Standard Brands. 



obby display heralds southwestern premiere 
f "Man from 'Frisco" at the Majestic, 
louston, Texas. 



by three leading department stores and the 
main library as well as its ten branch locations 
also aided in dispensing the markers. Grin- 
nell's and the Lion Store featured full window 
displays of books, 5 & 10c stores and down- 
town eateries used imprinted napkins, and 10,- 
000 heralds plugging the film were distributed 
house to house and at factory entrances. 

THE MAN FROM FRISCO 

In connection with the southwestern pre- 
miere of "Man from Frisco," which opened at 
the Majestic theatre in Houston, Jack Jack- 
son, 'publicity director for Interstate's local 
houses, working in close cooperation with the 
shipyards, effected some fine promotions. 

Steve Edwards, director of publicity for Re- 
public Pictures, spent a week in Houston and 
assisted in the preparation of the campaign. 

Jackson arranged a screening of the film, 
which was attended by a labor-management 
committee of the Todd Houston Shipyards and 
members of the Propeller Club, an organiza- 
tion interested in the ship building industry. 

Todd's daily advertisements on the want-ad 
pages called attention to the picture's engage- 
ment at the Majestic; plugs for the film and 
theatre credits were used over the yard's loud 
speaker system twice daily; the labor-man- 
agement committee issued a bulletin to the 
workers endorsing the picture; notices were 
posted on all bulletin boards, and the house 
organ, Yardarm, devoted stories and art to the 
film. 

Playdates Publicized Through 
Payroll Slips and Bulletins 

Four other local shipyards advised their em- 
ployees of theatre and playdate notice through 
payroll envelope slips and placards posted near 
time-clocks as well as on bulletin boards. 

J. C. Penney Company devoted an entire 
window to a display of welding helmets and 
stills from the attraction with Maritime Com- 
mission posters as a background and full thea- 
tre credit. The Maritime Commission recruit- 
ing office also used a display of stills on its 
bulletin board. 

A tieup with Standard Brands resulted in 



400 grocery stores displaying miniature 24- 
sheet boards on counters. Additional news- 
paper advertising, spot announcements over 
radio stations KTRH, KXYZ and KPRC, and 
24-sheet posting, rounded out the campaign. 

In conjunction with the picture's New York 
opening at Loew's State theatre, considerable 
publicity stemmed from a screening arranged 
for members of the Propeller Club. Following 
the showing, copies of a letter of endorsement 
by the organization president, John F. Gehan, 
were sent to 1,600 members of the New York 
chapter of the club, advising them of the thea- 
tre playdate. 

The Sperry Gyroscope Company used an- 
nouncements over the public address system 
during the workers' lunch periods which 
reached more than 35,000 employees in its 
Brooklyn and Long Island plants. Other ship- 
yards in the area displayed stills and tiein copy 
on bulletin boards. 



Radio Coverage Highlights 
"Meet the People" Date 

A well rounded campaign which included 
excellent radio coverage was arranged for 
"Meet the People" at Loew's Valentine, in 
Toledo, Ohio, through the efforts of Ted 
Teschner. Stations WSPD ran 25 paid and 
gratis spot announcements one week before 
and through the opening of the picture. WTOL 
ran 32 paid and gratis spots ahead and during 
run too. 

Fain's Women's Clothing shop, which sponsors 
a recording program every Saturday afternoon 
for two hours came through with several songs ' 
from the picture, the announcer giving the 
picture credit and mentioning the opening. This 
was on the air preceding the opening. 

Eight sheets were used to cover the entire 
store front directly across from the entrance, 
200 one-sheets were posted outside of all war 
plants, copy reading : "War Workers Say Hello 
to MGW's merriest musical hit Wednesday, 
at Midnight 'Meet the People', etc.". Permission 
was also had from the C.I.O. to tack up 1000 
11 by 14 cards on all their bulletin boards in 
the 72 plants in the city, and the entire fleet 
of local news trucks carried 26 by 36 cards. 



ANASERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY 8, 1944 



53 



KING GETS JUDGES' NOD FOR 
QUIGLEY AWARDS PLAQUE 



Women Figure in Voting; 
Scrolls and Citation 
Awards to 43 Showmen 

Conti'nuing the terrific exploitation pace set 
during the past year, James J. King, director 
of publicity for the RKO Boston theatre, 
Boston, won the fourth Quarterly Plaque in 
succession, for the period ending June 30. 

The following contestants for the Quigley 
Awards, listed alphabetically, were voted 
Scrolls of Honor by the judges for the excel- 
lence of their promotions in the Second 
Quarter: 

Lige Brien, Warners' Enright, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gertrude Bunchez, Loew's Century, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Jack Foxe, Loew's, Richmond, Va. 

Margarette Goyette, Denham theatre, Den- 
ver, Colo. 

Rita Morton, RKO Albee, Providence, R. I. 

Joe Samartano, Loew's State, Providence, 
R. I. 

Charles B. Taylor, Shea's Theatres, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Gertrude Bunchez, publicist for Loew's Cen- 
tury thea-rre in Baltimore, figured closely in 
the judges' estimation for top honors. An- 
other woman, Rita Morton, who handles the 
publicity at the RKO Albee in Providence, 
R. I., also figured prominently in the voting. 
Lige Brien, manager of Warners' Enright, 
Pittsburgh, Grand Awards v/inner for the year 
1939, and Joseph Samartano, lately of Loew's 
Palace, Meriden, Conn., now at the circuit's 
State theatre in Providence, also received 
special commendation from the judging com- 
mittee. 

Margarette Goyette, publicist for the Den- 
ham theatre, Denver, Charles B. Taylor, direc- 
tor of advertising for Shea's in Buffalo, N. Y., 
and Jack Foxe, manager of Loew's, Richmond, 
Va., were likewise voted Scrolls of Honor for 
their exceptional work. 

Outstanding among the Citation Winners 
were the campaigns submitted by Sid Dickler, 
manager of the Belmar, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mor- 
ris Rosenthal, Poli, New Haven, Conn., Matt 
Saunders, Poli, Bridgeport, Conn., Louis E. 
Mayer, RKO Palace, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
Frank LaBar, Imperial, Asheville, N. C. 

The material of the runners-up, together 
with that of James King, will be among those 
considered for the Grand Awards Competi- 
tion. All of their material submitted for the 
balance of the year will be entered for the 
Grand Awards and considered at that time. 

The judges for the Second Quarter were: 
Frank Rosenberg, Director of Advertising 
and Publicity, Columbia Pictures; James 
Dunn, Director of Publicity, United Artists, 
and Phil Williams, Director of Advertising 
and Publicity, March of Time. 




By Staff Photographer 

The Second Quarter Quigley Awards judges look over the campaigns. In the usual left to right 
are Frank Rosenberg, Director of Advertising and Publicity, Columbia Pictures; fames Dunn, 
Director of Publicity, United Artists, and Phil Williams, Director of Advertising and Pub- 
licity, March of Time. 



Second Quarter Citation Winners 



The following contestants for the Quigley Awards, having submitted entries of merit, 
will receive Certificates of Citation. The list includes some past Award winners and 
many newcomers to the competition. 



ELMER ADAMS 
Yucca, Midland, Tex. 


SAM GILMAN 
Loew's, Harrisburg, Pa. 




CARL ROGERS 

Loew's Esquire, Toledo, O. 


JOSEPH BOYLE 
Poli, Norwich, Conn. 


EDGAR GOTH 

Fabian, Staten Island, N.Y. 




MORRIS ROSENTHAL 
Poli, New Haven, Conn. 


ELMER BRENNAN 
Bay, Green Bay, Wis. 


ARTHUR GROOM 

Loew's State, .Memphis, Ten 


n. 


MATT SAUNDERS 
Poli, Bridgeport, Conn. 


LOUIS CHARNINSKY 
Capitol, Dallas, Tex. 


ELLIOTT JOHNSON 
Malco, Memphis, Tenn. 




BOYD SCOTT 

Granada, Springfield, Mo. 


MARLOWE CONNER 

Capitol, Madison, Wis. 


MEL JOLLEY 

Marks, Oshawa, Ont., Cana 


da 


SID SCOTT 

Capitol, Sudbury, Ont., Canada 


TOM DELBRIDGE 
Vendome, Nashville, Tenn. 


FRANK LA BAR 
Imperial, Asheville, N. C. 




CHARLES SHANNON 
Columbia, Sharon, Pa. 


SID DICKLER 

Belmar, Pittsburgh, Pa. 


JOE LONGO 

Loew's State, Boston, Mass. 




BOYD SPARROW 
Loew's, Indianapolis, Ind. 


D. M. DILLENBECK 
Rialto, Bushnell, III. 


ABE LUDACER 
Park, Cleveland, O. 




HARRY D. STEARN 
Manring, Middlesboro, Ky. 


CARL EGAN 

Palace, Calgary, Alberta 


JACK MATLACK 
Broadway, Portland, Ore. 




MOLLIE STICKLES 
Palace, Meriden, Conn. 


WILLIAM EAGEN 
Princess, Sioux City, la. 


LOUIS E. MAYER 

RKO Albee, Providence, R. 


1. 


TED TESCHNER 
Valentine, Toledo, O. 


DICK FELDMAN 
Keith, Syracuse, N. Y. 


CHARLES PINCUS 
Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 




GERTRUDE TRACY 
Ohio, Cleveland, O. 


ARNOLD GATES 
Stillman, Cleveland, O. 


JESSIE PULCIPHER 
Loew's Palace, Washington, 


D. C. 


H. F. WILSON 

Regent, Brockville, Ont., Canada 



56 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD. JULY 8, 1944 



GOODNIGHT TO THE BLUES 
High-speed hilarity. Its the dizziest, daffiest 
blues-chaser of the season. 





GOODNIGHT 
SWEETHEART 

ROBERT LIVI06ST0H and RUTH Iffifiy 

HENRY HULL GRANT WITHERS 

THURSTON HALL LLOYD CORRIGAN 

JOSEPH SANTLEY — Director 



Original Story by Frank Fenton — Joseph Hoffman 
Screenplay by Isabel Dawn — lack Townley 



8 REPUBLIC PICTURE 

JOIN THE FIGHTING FIFTH WAR LOAN 



1919 s VISION 

IS 1,344'$ REALITY 




A DREAM COME TRUE— a completely coor- 
dinated and integrated air-rail express 
service! 

Ever since the fast, safe, personalized 
handling of shipments we know as Ex- 
press Service was developed in 1839, it 
has been distinguished by adapting new 
techniques. 

From the moment the airplane was 
proved capable of sustained flight, alert 
Railway Express began to plan how this 
new transportation vehicle could be 
made to serve the needs of industry and 
the public. 

Step by step the way was proved. 1919 
saw the first chartered flight for Air Ex- 
press on a definite route, New York to 
Chicago. 1927 was a real milestone year. 
It saw the establishment of the nation's 
first Air Express network serving 26 air- 
port cities coast-to-coast, and the forma- 
tion of Air Express Division of the Ex- 
press company, the basic step toward pro- 
viding a responsible, co-ordinated air-rail 
express service. 1944— Air Express direct- 
ly serves 350 airport cities at 3-mile-a- 
minute speed, and 23,000 Railway Ex- 
press offices the nation over through in- 
tegrated Air-Rail service. International 
Air Express to over 60 foreign countries. 

From 5,160 shipments in four months 
of 1927 to over 1,500,000 in 1943-that's 
the record of Air Express. Serving the 
war effort today with spectacular success, 
Air Express coordinated with Railway 
Express will serve you well tomorrow. 




Shannon Distributes 
"Twain" Booklets 

Chuck Shannon at the Columbia theatre in 
Sharon, Pa., had 2000 brochure booklets 
printed on the "Jumping Frog" and had them 
distributed to every student in the high school 
English classes as part of his campaign on 
"Mark Twain." Chuck also offered 25 tickets 
to the best book reports submitted by the stu- 
dents and the brochure took the place of one 
of the required book reports. English teachers 
selected the winners and colored maps of the 
United States showing the travels of Twain 
were posted in all English classes. 

Numerous bookstore window displays were 
promoted, radio coverage brought five 15-min- 
ute special programs; bookmarks were dis- 
tributed to the high schools and public libraries 
and a special lobby display was used. 



Teaser Campaign Launches 
"Lost Angel" Date 

E. C. Grady at the Hossier theatre in Whi- 
ting Ind., used a teaser campaign directed at 
children in advance of his opening of "Lost 
Angel." Notices and readers ran in the local 
papers advising children up to 12 years of age 
that photos of Margaret O'Brien would be hid- 
den in two of the city's parks and to those find- 
ing them and bringing them to the theatre, 
guest tickets would be awarded. 

Grady also contacted heads of the local 
schools and offered guest tickets to each child 
named Margaret; there were 26 in all. The 
offer was announced in the schools. Window 
cards were distributed about town as were 
3,000 programs. 

Victory Garden Proceeds 
Go to Worthy Cause 

Century's Mayfair theatre, in Brooklyn, has 
begun to sow the seeds of Victory in its own 
private Victory Garden, according to manager 
Harold Newman. The entire staff of the May- 
fair has been busily engaged in the cultivation 
of corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots and 
radishes in a 16x35 foot lot adjacent to the 
theatre. Proceeds from the sale of the vegetable 
produce will be devoted to some worthy war 
activity. This unique theatre project has excited 
the enthusiasm of the surrounding vicinity, and 
the patrons of the neighborhood are actively 
lending their assistance. 



Riester Gets Wide Coverage 

Supporting his claim to wide newspaper cov- 
erage for the date of "Lady in the Dark" at 
the Capitol theatre, Shamokin, Pa., George J. 
Riester sends along tear sheets from the local 
dailies which carried plenty of art and story 
breaks on the picture well in advance and dur- 
ing the run. 

In addition, Riester used 20 spot announce- 
ments with station WKOK, Sunbury, Pa., 
which covers the Shamokin area, plus various 
window tieups, mailing campaign and the usual 
lobby display advertising. 



Gamble's Theatre Program 

When Frederick Gamble took over the Rex 
theatre in Tacoma, Wash., he immediately set 
oul to publish an effective theatre program. 
Measuring four-and-one-half by six inches, the 
two-fold program is printed in blue ink. The 
front cover carried a note reading; "Important 
June Events." This was followed by: "1. The 
Fifth War Loan — Order Bonds at the theatre. 
2. M-G-M's 20th Anniversary." The inside 
and Fifth War Loan Order Bonds at the thea- 
tre. 2. M-G-M's 20th Anniversary." The in- 
side and a list of pictures to be shown the fol- 
lowing month. 



Sells Newspaper 
Escapist Value 
Of Contest 

With the Beacon Journal acting as sponso 
for a "Cover Girl" contest, manager Sid Hoi 
land of the Palace theatre in Akron, lande 
front page news breaks, feature stories and ai 
and a special layout in the rotogravure sectio 
plugging the engagement of the film "Cove 
Girl" for three weeks prior to the picture' 
playdate. 

From the standpoint of attention value an 
interest, the promotion was one of the mos 
succesful ever staged with newspaper coopera 
tion. 

The Beacon Journal, notorious for its con 
servative policy went all out as an escapis 
angle from war news and stress. Front pag 
breaks were a daily occurrence and so prolifi 
was the publicity that 625 entrants were at 
tracted to the contest. 

A banquet was promoted at the Mayflowe 
Hotel at which time the winner of the contes 
was acclaimed as "Akron's Cover Girl" an 
presented with a War Bond and other gift 
donated by local merchants. 

Holland also secured 24 full window display 
from downtown business concerns and built i 
flash front which attracted current attention t< 
the film. 



Book Display Promoted 
On "San Luis Rey" 

Contacting the Cranston Company of Nor 
wich, Conn., Joseph Boyle at Loew's Pol 
Broadway, in advance of his date on "San Lui: 
Rey" promoted a window display on the book 
In addition 1,000 bookmarks were distributee 
at lending and public libraries and at the pub 
lie schools. The "Bridge" contest as outlinec 
in the pressbook was also utilized. 

For his date on "The Sullivans," Boylt 
sought the largest local Sullivan family an< 
invited them to be guests of the managemen 
on the opening day of the picture. Middy cap; 
were worn by the entire staff during the rur 
and spot announcements landed on Statior 
WNLC. 




A neat tieup, engineered by Stephen Tot) 
obtained this plug for "Two Girls and 
Sailor" during Toledo engagement at Locu\ 
Valentine. Entire news delivery trucks we 
bannered. 



58 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 19 



E 



ERSONALS 



In New Posts: Joe Samartano, Loew's thea- 
■re, Providence, R. I. Mollie Stickles, Palace, 
sleriden, Conn. George Harvey, Palace, Torring- 
lon, Conn. J. Bingemer, Jr., Luna, Chicago, 111. 
.(3. Levy, Cine, Chicago. Paul Klingler, Loew's 
frrand, Waterbury, Conn. Harold Weidner, Jr., 
.impress, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Lorna Pauls, Madison, Detroit, Mich. Robert 
Emory, Strand, Hudson Falls, X. Y. Louis Pa- 
■ine, Drive-In, Detroit. Ed Weingarden, Columbia 
heatre, Flint, Mich. Malcolm Rose, Palms State, 
r.eatre, Detroit, Mich. William Duggan, general 
r.anager, Sterling Theatres, Seattle, Wash. A. J. 
lortright, Strand, Lambertville, N. J. Joseph S. 
.Yilliams, Rialto, Allentown, Pa. Mansfield Bow- 
ers, Belvidere, Belvidere, N. J. Henry F. Joseph- 
ck, RKO Capitol, Trenton. Joseph H. Kochs, 
Warner's Capitol ; John Dempsey, Warner's Ritz, 
md Roy MacDonald, Southern, all of York, Pa. 

Frank Paul, Lyric, Indianapolis, Ind. Joe Mur- 
doch, Warner, Morgantown, West Va. Francis 
Aiello, Latrobe, Latrobe, Pa. 

Assistant Managers: George C. Gable, Rialto, 
and Harry Mrsser, Warner's Ritz, York, Pa. 
.Charles G. Pitts, Circle, Indianapolis. 

Happy Birthday: Herman Shulgold, C. More- 
lock, Joseph P. Avila, Jr., Jerome Adelman, Frank 
; E. Case, Alfred Skigen, James Thomas Shrake, 
John G. Xewkirk, Harry Clifford, Beryl Davis, 
George W. Eckerd, John J. Medford, George L. 
Barman, Ralph B. Ketchum, Frank Bocker, Charles 
Xygaard, Ben Engel. 

Ben Goldman, Earl St. John, Robert Gibbs, 
Memville Galliart, Charles Phelps, Frank Dudley, 
Sam Schwarzchild, Forrest Swiger, B. F. Adcock, 
Felix Tisdale, Nat Blank, Ernest Hatfield, Ty 
Grasiano, George Allen, E. L. Dilley, Robert 
Schmidt, Harry Pappas, Herbert Mueller, Joseph 
. Mahoney. Thomas Grace, Jacob Vidumsky, John 
Revels, Roy Liebman, Arnold Rubin, Ben Mindlin, 
Charles Hoge, Emerson Barrett, Richard Feldman. 

Junior Showmen: Robert Louis, on June 22 
to Mr. and Mrs. Al Simon. Father is house man- 
ager at the RKO Keith Memorial, Boston, Mass. 
Twins, Mary Ann and David Edward, on June 15 
to Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Welch. Daddy is 

..chief projectionist at the Strand, Rockland. Maine. 

I 

_ In the Service: Harry Wiener, RKO Capitol, 
-Trenton. N. J. Charles MacDonald. Souther, 
DYork, Pa. Margaret McCorkle, Warner's Stanley. 
' Philadelphia. Francis Anthony. Rialto, York, Pa 



NOW AVAILABLE . . . 

THEATRE EXECUTIVE 

CAPABLE OF TAKING OVER 
COMPLETE OPERATION OF GROUP 
OF THEATRES. FORMERLY 
DISTRICT AND DIVISION MANAGER 
FOR MAJOR CIRCUIT; NOW 
GENERAL MANAGER FOR SMALL 
INDEPENDENT CIRCUIT BUT 
POSSIBILITIES ARE LIMITED. 
WISH TO CONNECT WITH PRO- 
GRESSIVE ORGANIZATION WITH 
VIEW TO POST-WAR EXPANSION. 
THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED IN 
FILM BUYING, BOOKING, ADVER- 
TISING, EXPLOITATION AND 
GENERAL OPERATION OF ALL 
TYPES OF THEATRES. OVER DRAFT 
AGE BUT YOUNG ENOUGH TO 
HANDLE A TOUGH ASSIGNMENT. 
INTERVIEW CAN BE ARRANGED. . 
ADDRESS BOX 1755, c/o MOTION 
PICTURE HERALD. 





The Only 

NATIONAL, WEEKLY NEWSREEL 

DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO 




NOW BEING SHOWN WEEKLY BY THESE LEADING CIRCUITS: 



BAILEY THEATRES, Atlanta 
BALABAN & KATZ, Chicago 
BIJOU AMUSEMENT CO., Nashville 
BRECHER CIRCUIT, New York 
BRODER THEATRES, Detroit 
CO-OPERATIVE THEATRES, Detroit 
DICKINSON THEATRES, Wichita 



ESSANESS CIRCUIT, Chicago 
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES 
LICHTMAN THEATRES, Washington 
LOEW THEATRES, New York 
ROME THEATRES, Baltimore 
RKO THEATRES, New York 
WOMETCO CIRCUIT, Miami 




90th WEEK f 



To the above Circuits and to the Hundreds of Independent Exhibitors throughout the 
Nation who are exhibiting our Newsreels, we extend our Sincere Gratitude! 

EDITORIAL AND HOME OFFICES 

2901 Prairie Avenue 
CHICAGO 16, ILL. 




SALES AND DISTRIBUTION OFFICES: 

NEW YORK 
1 19 West 57th St. 



DALLAS, TEX. 
Jackson and Harwood 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
1735 W. 6th Street 



ATLANTA, GA. 
189 Walton St. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
3206 Olive St. 

LONDON (England) 
National House 
66 Wardour St. 





MANAGERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY 8, 1944 



59 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Ten cents per word, money-order or check with copy. Count initials, box number and ad- 
dress. Minimum insertion, $1. Four insertions, for the price of three. Contract rates on 
application. No borders or cuts. Forms close Mondays at 5 P. M. Publisher reserves 
the right to reject any copy. Film and trailer advertising not accepted. Class!* 
fted advertising not subject to agency commission. Address copy and checks: 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD, Classified Dept., Rockefeller Center, New York (20) 




THEATRES 



THEATRE WANTED. MOVIE HOUSE TO LEASE 
or buy, suburban town preferred. Write details to 
DOMINION SALES CO., 12-05 43rd Avenue, Long Island 
City 1, N. Y. 

THEATRE WANTED— $25,000 TO $50,000 FOR THE- 
atre in town over 30,000 population »n Illinois, Indiana, 
Wisconsin. Deal with principal. Give full details. Con- 
fidential. BOX 1754, MOTION PICTTJ Ri C HERALD. 



VENTILATING EQUIPMENT 



MOTORS. NEW, USED, ALL SIZES, VARIABLE 
•peed pulleys, deflectors, exhaust fans. SOUTHERN AIRE, 

BOX 838, Atlanta 1, Ga. 

SQUIRREL CAGE BLOWERS — NEW FACTORY 
stock for prompt shipment — send us your order marking 
AA5 Priority MRO (Maintenance, Repair or Operation) 
priced less motor, 5,000 cfm, $75.; 8,500 cfm, $99.75; 11,000 
cfm, $119.50; 13.500 cfm, $149.50 ; 22,500 cfm, $199.50 ; 27,500 
cfm, $234.50. Rebuilt motors furnished at lowest market 
prices. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP.. New York 18. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES; TRAIN FOR BETTER 
position. Learn modern theatre management and adver- 
tising. Big opportunities for trained men. Established since 
1927 Write now for free catalog. THEATRE MANAGERS 
SCHOOL, Elmira, New York. 



BOOKS 



RICHARDSON'S BLUEBOOK OF PROJECTION. 
Best seller since 1911. Now in 7th edition. Revised to 
present last word in Sound-Trouble Shooting Charts. Ex- 
pert information on all phases of projection and equipment. 
Special new section on television. Invaluable to beginner 
and expert. $7.25 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New -York 20. 

MOTION PICTURE SOUND ENGINEERING. A 
"must" to all those working w:th sound equipment. Writ- 
ten by top- flight engineering experts of Hollywood studios 
and research laboratories. Covers all phases of sound 
engineering and equipment. Readable diagrams, charts, 
tables and graphs. $6.50, postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOK- 
SHOP, 1270 Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 

AIR CONDITIONING, WHETHER YOUR THEATRE 

has 300 or 3,000 seats, this book has all the answers on 
air conditioning. Explains various codes and laws con- 
cerning installation. Common sense charts. Indexed. Covers 
air conditioning as it relates to all branches of film indus- 
try. $4. postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 Sixth Ave- 
nue, New York 20. 

SOUND-TROUBLE SHOOTING CHARTS. THE LIT- 
tle book with the blue cover all good operators reach for 
when trouble starts. Will clear up that "puzzler" on all 
types of sound equipment in a jiffy. No booth complete 
without one, $1.00 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 



BOOKKEEPING SYSTEM 



THEATRE MANAGEMENT RECORD AND TAX 
Register. A book that takes the headache out of theatre 
accounting. Covers every detail of accounting in theatre 
operation. Makes keeping of up-to-the-minute records a 
pleasure. Attractive leather cover with gold stamping. $2 
now if you order fast. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP. 1270 Sixth 
Avenue, New York 20. 



HELP WANTED 



MANAGER - POSITION AVAILABLE FOR THEA- 
tre in Massachusetts. Replies confidential. BOX 1747, 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 

WANTED— ASSISTANT HOUSE MANAGER. STATE 
experience, salary expected and references in your appli- 
cation and include picture. COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT 
CO., Paducah, Ky. 



STUDIO EQUIPMENT 



WESTINGHOUSE SYNCHRONOUS MOTORS, 3600 
rpm, 220V three-phase, cost new $105., good condition, 
$57.50; Bell-Ho-well 220V three-phase camera motor, $125; 
Berndt-Maurer 16mm. recording system, $1,995. Completely 
equipped sound truck for sale. Write for lists. S. O. S. 
CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 



NEW EQUIPMENT 



i - — ■ 



DRINKING FOUNTAIN BUBBLERS, $9.95; PHILCO 
intercommunicating systems, master and three substations. 
$74.75; rear shutters for Simplex, $77.50; 15 ampere recti- 
fier bulbs, $6.95; film splicers. 35mm., $5.25; 16mm., $6.95; 
jewelled aisle lights, $3.95; Johnson coin changers, $110.; 
black velourette masking, 79c yard; steel core curtain 
cable, 1254c ft.; rechargeable flashlight batteries, $2.20. 
Bargain bulletin mailed. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY 
CORP., New York 18. 



USED EQUIPMENT 



SIX COMPLETE BOOTH EQUIPMENTS — EVEN 
more if required — plenty machines available. Typical value 
—two rebuilt Powers, incandescent lamphouses, sound- 
heads, motors, amplifier, monitor, loudspeaker and sound - 
screen, $975. Send for special bulletins. S. O. S. CINE- 
MA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 

STILL HAVE PLENTY CHAIRS— DON'T WAIT- 
buy now — 390 Stafford 5-ply veneer back, box spring cush- 
ion chairs, excellent condition. $4.95; 400 Stafford heavy 
inserted panel back, box spring cushion chairs, $6.50 re- 
built, reupholstered; 252 Grand Rapids ballbearing inserted 
panel back; box spring cushion chairs, $4.50 good condi- 
tion; 700 red twill slipcovers for backs, 49c each, good 
condition. Wire now. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP.. 
New York 18. 



SIGN PAINTING 



SIGN PAINTING. EASY WAY TO PAINT SIGNS. 
Use letter patterns. Avoid sloppy work, wasted time. No 
experience needed for expert work. Free sample. JOHN 
RAHN, 1329 Central Ave., Chicago, 51, 



BUSINESS BOOSTERS 



BINGO CARDS, DIE CUT, 1 TO 100 OR 1 TO 75, $2.25 

per thousand, $20.00 for 10,000. S. KLOUS, care of MO- 
TION PICTURE HERALD. 



PRINTING SERVICE 



THEATRE BLOWUPS. GOOD QUALITY. SERVICE 

STITES PORTRAIT CO., Shelbyville, Ind. 



"Went Away" Will Open at 
New York Capitol July 20 

David O. Selznick's "Since You Went Away" 
will have its premiere at the Capitol theatre, New 
York, July 20. Released through United Artists, 
it was directed by John Cromwell and features 
seven stars — Claudette Colbert, Jennifer Jones, Jo- 
seph Cotten, Shirley Temple, Monty Woolley, 
Lionel Barrvmore and Robert Walker. 



Dows Lease Theatre 

Leiberman's Proven Pictures film house, Hart- 
ford, Conn., has been leased for 10 years to Al 
and Belle Dow who have remodeled the house 
for legitimate stock after eight years of films. 



Keefe Visits Home Office 

James Keefe, Twentieth Century-Fox field ex- 
ploitation representative, with headquarters in Cin- 
cinnati, is visiting the home office. 



Plan to Unionize Office 
Employees in Canada 

The American Federation of Labor, through 
Toronto District Labor Council, has made 
initial move for the formation of a union for of 
employees and other workers in the film busiri 
in Canada under the Federal Government Ord 
in-Council passed February 17 dealing with W 
time Labor Relations and providing a collect 
bargaining code. 

Under the government decree no action can 
taken by an employer against a worker who jo 
a trade union. 

A meeting is to be held in Toronto shortly 
organize film employees. This first move to uni 
ize Canada's industry will include also the forr 
tion of a branch for theatre employees in Cana 
The projectionists are already organized, in 
IATSE. 



Fanchon & Marco Shift 
Several Managers 

Following the promotion last week of Albert S' 
son, former district manager of the St. Lc 
Amusement Company, to the post of War Activi' 
director for Fanchon & Marco — St. Louis Ami- 
ment Company, Harry C. Arthur, Jr., general m 
ager, has announced the promotion to Mr. Stetsc 
former post of Henry Riegel, manager of the A 
basador, one of the circuit's downtown de li 
theatres. 

Mr. Riegel's successor is Albert Wheeler, m 
ager of the Shady Oak theatre, who has been s 
ceeded by Frank Treanor, former assistant mana 
of the^ Ambassador. Igor Geffin has replaced 1 
Treanor as co-assistant manager with Fran 
Smith. 

The policy of two assistant house managers £ 
has been put into effect at the Fox theatre, w 
Tony Peluso assisted by Frank Catlin and Aus 
Nobeley. 



Two Companies Formed 

Amalgamated Theatres, Inc., of New Hkven, '. 
filed certificate of incorporation with the Sec 
tary of State at Hartford, showing Lewis S. Gi 
burg, former U. A. salesman, Rita B. Ginsbv. 
of New Haven, and Alice Levy and Bernard Li 
of Hartford, as incorporators. In Hartford, C 
necticut Theatre Productions, Inc., has filed c 
tificate of organization, showing James Biala 
of Wethersfield, president, James J. Connors, Hj 
ford, vice-president, Herbert E. Golinsky, W 
Hartford, secretary and treasurer. 



Warner Shorts in Archives 

Warner Brothers have donated prints of n 
patriotic short subjects produced since 1940 to 
film collection of the National Archives in Wa 
ington. The pictures are : "March on, Marine 
"Meet the Fleet," "A Ship is Born," "The Fig 
ing Engineers," "Spirit of West Point," "Eagles 
the Navy," "Our African Frontier," "Spirit 
Annapolis" and "Mountain Fighters." 



Goldberg on Council 

Harry Goldberg, national director of adver 
ing and publicity for Warner Brothers Theat 
has been reelected to the board of directors of 
Philadelphia Jewish Community Relations Co 
ciL Mr. Goldberg has been actively associated vi 
the work of the Council, formerly known as 
Philadelphia Anti-Defamation Council, in its t 
motion of racial and religious unity. 



Hearing on Union's Plea 

A hearing was held last week by the New Y 
State Labor Relations Board on the petition 
the Motion Picture Theatre Managers, Assiste 
and Cashiers Union to be designated collec 
bargaining agent for managers, assistants 
cashiers in RKO theatres in the metropolitan a 
A decision on the petition is expected shortly. 



Wright Wins Award 

James Wright, Paramount cameraman attac 
to British Paramount News, was awarded 
Order of the British Empire by King George 
on the occasion of his recent birthday. Mr. Wr 
has flown 46 missions over enemy territory. 



60 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, t 




SHOWMEN'S REVIEWS 

SHORT SUBJECTS 

ADVANCE SYNOPSES 

RELEASE CHART BY COM- 
PANIES 

THE RELEASE CHART 



This department deals with 
new product from the point of 
view of the exhibitor who is 
to purvey it to his own public. 



Aarshal of Reno 

epublic — Western 

Red Ryder, in the person of Wild Bill Elliott, 
: mes to the aid of the oppressed in a taut little 
'ama which Lou Gray produced and 'Wallace 
'■issell directed. Abetted by George "Gabby" 
ayes and Bobby Blake, Bill deals out swift jus- 

e, untangles the town's affairs and forces the 

lains to flee. 

The screenplay by Anthony Coldewey, from an 
iginal story by him and Taylor Caven, concerns 

"e efforts of a gang of blackguards, led by Her- 
rt Rawlinson in the role of a newspaper pub- 
iher, to blacken the reputation of the town of 
ue Springs. An innocent Easterner, played with 
ncerity by Jay Kirby, is blamed for the gang's 
predations. But Wild Bill sees through the 
tifice, rescues the boy, and exposes the villains. 
It's standard Western fare, but ingeniously con- 
iv'ed, and should satisfy the fans. 
Seen at Hollywood's Hitching Post theatre, 
here a matinee audience received it with enthu- 

Jtstn. Reviewer's Rating : Good. — Thalia Bell. 

Release date, July 2, 1944. Running time, 54 min. PCA 

0. 10,067. General audience classification. 
'■A Ryder Wild Bill Elliott 

jbby George "Gabby" Hayes 

' ttle Beaver Bobby Blake 

"ae Duchess Alice Fleming 

t- y Kirby. Herbert Rawlinson, Tom Chatterton, LeRoy 
Mason. 

aw of the Saddle 

RC— Western 

■ Here's another film that adheres faithfully to 
_>e law of the Western, replete with galloping 
;) iofs, blazing guns, stage holdups, and a heroine 
b scued from outlaws in the nick of time. Mel- 

lle De Lay skillfully directed the ebb and flow 
I the action, with Bob Livingston, as the "Lone 

ider" displaying pistol markmanship equaled only 

' his fistic flourishes. 

! The plot is about a gang of itinerant outlaws 

iho go from town to town, have their leader 
"ected sheriff, then loot the unwary townsfolk 

id pass quickly on to new towns to conquer. 

he Lone Rider, bent upon breaking up the 

•sperados, falls victim to their plot, is accused 
• murder and thrown behind bars. There fol- 

"ws a jailbreak and the execution of a counter- 
jot in which he snares the outlaws and vindicates 

s name. 

The film's comic element is abundantly supplied 
j 7 Al St. John, whose madcap antics are a re- 
eshing highlight. Production is by Sigmund 
eufeld, with original story and screenplay by 
J red Myton. 

" Seen in the New York theatre where the audi- 
'ice was passive, zvith one or two stirrings of 
ecitement. Reviewer's Rating : Fair. — Mandel 

ERBSTMAX. 

Release date, August 28, 1943. Running time, 59 min. 
2A No. 9467. General audience classification. 

ocky Cameron Bob Livingston 

jzzy Jones Al St. John 

ayle Betty Miles 

eve Kinney Lane Chandler 

\n Kirby..' John Elliott 

:»ve Reed Howes 

-•e Curley Dresden 

irt Al Ferguson 

c Frank Ellis 

OTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



BRITISH WAR FILM 
NOW IN RELEASE 

The film produced by Cavalcanti in 
Britain's Ealing Studios as "Went the 
Day Well?" is now being distributed in 
this country by the A.F.E. Corp. of New 
York. Featuring Basil Sydney, Leslie 
Banks, Frank Lawton and Elizabeth Allan, 
it tells the story of an English village 
which has been invaded by Nazi para- 
troopers masquerading as British sol- 
diers. The disguise is successful for a 
time, but small, suspicious acts finally 
provoke a realization of the situation. 
The men are rounded up with the aid of 
a poacher, an evacuee and the stalwart 
Home Guard. The review in Motion 
Picture Herald, issue of November 14, 
1942, said in part: "It should appeal 
mainly to that brand of audience which 
brings no critical attitude to bear on a 
picture's plausibility or conviction. It is 
all handled on the most ingenious lines, 
and the direction is more often confus- 
ing than comforting, with the greatest 
puzzle at times to tell who is on whose 
side. The camerawork is excellent, nota- 
bly in the very charming settings of the 
village." 

The picture is now playing the Little 
Carnegie theatre, a New York house on 
the "art circuit," under the title "Forty- 
eight Hours." 

The running time of the film is 90 
minutes. 



Return of the Ape Man 

Monogram — Scare Job 

When the prehistoric man chipped out of an 
iceberg and restored to life in this enterprise 
climbs out of a window, his BVD's show beneath 
the hairy garment he's been wearing since before 
the ice age. Later on, after the mad scientist has 
endowed the ape-man with a section of up-to-date 
brain borrowed from his best friend, the prehis- 
toric one plays Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata on 
the piano without batting a savage but soulful eye. 
The preview audience which witnessed the exhibi- 
tion in Hollywood laughed right at the times which 
were the wrong places. 

Robert Charles' script, from his own story, pre- 
tends that the ape-man comes out of his age-long 
sleep a killer possessed of super-human strength 
and no brains, and that the scientist who brought 
him out of it sacrifices the life of a friend to trans- 
plant his brain into the ape-man's cranium, but 
doesn't improve matters any by doing so. Bela 
Lugosi, John Carradine and George Zucco, experts 



in this sort of thing, certainly got into something 
this time. 

The item is a Sam Katzman-Jack Dietz produc- 
tion with Barney A. Sarecky functioning as asso- 
ciate producer and Philip Rosen as director. They 
done it. 

Previewed at the Laurel theatre, Hollywood, 
where an audience present to see "The Heart of a 
Nation" started giggling in the first sequence of 
the previevued picture and took it in laughing 
stride from there on out. Reviewer's Rating: 
Terrific! — William R. Weaver. 

Release date, June 24, 1944. Running time, 60 min. PCA 
No. 9733. General audience classification. 

Scientist Bela Lugosi 

John Carradine, George Zucco, Frank Moran, Judith Gib- 
son, Mary Currier, Michael Ames, Mike Donova, George 
Eldridge, Ed. Chandler, Ernie Adams. 



Delinquent Daughters 

PRC — Another Delinquency Film 

PRC's contribution to the current cycle of 
juvenile delinquency pictures contains more action 
than most, including a suicide, several holdups, and 
a couple of killings. 

Arthur St. Claire, who wrote the screenplay, 
prescribes plenty of malted milk and a place for 
the youngsters to dance as a cure for the delin- 
quency problem and illustrates his theory with a 
story about high school kids who, under the tutel- 
age of a racketeer of more mature years, snatch 
purses, hold up gas stations and commit a payroll 
robbery in which a guard is killed. A lecture by 
the judge of the juvenile court causes those young- 
sters who are still alive at the end of the picture 
to mend their ways. 

The tale fails to convince, the dialogue lumbers, 
and the direction misfires. 

The film was produced by Donald C. McKean 
and Albert Herman. The latter also directed. 

Seen in a Hollywood projection room. Review- 
er's Rating: Fair. — T. B. 

Release date, July 15, 1944. Running time, 72 min. F'CA 
No. 10,168. General audience classification. 

Tune Thompson June Carlson 

Mimi Fifi D'Orsay 

Sally Higgins Teala Loring 

Mary Bovard, Marga Dean, Johnny Duncan, Joe Devlin, 
Jimmy Zaner, Jon Dawson. Frank McGlynn, Parker Gee, 
Marren Mills, John Christian. 



SHORT SUBJECT 

STUDENTS OF FORM (20th-Fox) 

Sports Review (4304) 

The "form" of the title is purposefully ambigu- 
ous. The students are very shapely girls learning 
to stay that way with the help of physical exer- 
cise of many types. They are photographed in 
competitive sports, at golf, volley ball and canoe 
racing. Some shots of horseback riding are in- 
cluded. And for the aesthetic touch there is some 
classical ballet in the open, highlighting the beau- 
ty of the subjects and the very meritorious purport 
of the film. Ed Thorgerson makes all the proper 
comments and explanations. 

Release date, June 30, 1944 9 minutes 



198 



SHORT SUBJECTS 

reviews and synopses 



HAPPY GO NUTTY (MGM) 

Technicolor Cartoon (W-536) 

Just when they've got the squirrel safely tucked 
away in the nut house he makes his escape. The 
bloodhound is set on his trail, a pretty sleepy 
animal with unending patience. He needs most 
of it for the chase, and he might have done better 
with a sense of humor. As it is, the squirrel has 
much the best of it in brain and footwork, with 
only dogged persistence on the other side. 

Release date, June 24, 1944 7 minutes 



CITY OF BRIGHAM YOUNG (MGM) 

Fitzpatrick Traveltalk (/-520) 

Here's a travel reel devoted to the metropolitan 
district of Salt Lake City rather than its natural 
wonders. The focal point is the city as center of 
the Mormon religion, with shots of the many 
churches and monuments and Brigham Young's 
tomb highlighting other scenes of the city and his- 
torical sites. There is music by the famed Salt 
Lake City Tabernacle Choir. 

Release date, June 17, 1944 9^ minutes 



JUNIOR JIVE BOMBERS (WB) 

Melody Masters (9609) 

Here's music from the younger set, the musi- 
cians who work up their own jam sessions and do 
all right by the classics too. They're shown in a 
number of performances — at the town dance hall, 
on the local radio station, at the junior prom and 
finally giving a dignified concert in the school. 
The theme song is "Working Our Way Through 
College," but "Mutiny in the Nursery" and the 
Second Hungarian Rhapsody also get a whirl. 

Release date, July 1, 1944 10 minutes 



THE DISILLUSIONED BLUEBIRD (Col.) 

Color Rhapsodies (5504) 

Just what has disillusioned the bird is not quite 
clear. It may be that he put his faith in block- 
busters and found himself rudely awakened in 
South America. Or it could even be that the 
Latin neighbors were more competition than he 
had bargained for. There's a crow singing to 
guitar accompaniment and an exotic character 
with the explosive singing style of Carmen 
Miranda. 

Release date, June 15, 1944 7 minutes 

COLORADO TROUT (WB) 

Sports Parade (9511) 

Here is a subject for present fishing enthusiasts 
and future automobile travelers. It relates the 
beauties of Gunnison in the Colorado Rockies, 
where the waters are well supplied with trout for 
the fisherman and the surrounding country is all 
that could be desired by those who just want to 
sit and dream. The subject is about 'halfway be- 
tween travel and sport reel. 

Release date, Jidy 1, 1944 10 minutes 



GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS (RKO) 

Leon Errol (43,706) 

Errol should never have agreed to take care of 
the talent end of his lodge show, knowing the 
jealous temperament of his wife and his own in- 

1982 



ability to keep out of trouble. As it is he visits 
a promising burlesque show just in time for the 
raid and spends the second reel dodging detectives, 
fan dancers, his wife and assorted members of 
the cast up and down the stairs of his apartment 
house. 

Release date, not set 17 minutes 



MAT MAULERS (Col.) 

World of Sports (5809) 

It's a far cry from the ancient Greek sport of 
wrestling to the present day capers on the mat. 
Form is no longer the yardstick. For the modern 
wrestling fan, color's the thing and comedy. Two 
exponents of this form of entertainment — Cham- 
pion Babe Sharkey and Dale Evans — illustrate the 
point while Bill Stern makes the proper com- 
ments. The result is more slapstick than sport, 
but the crowd roars in true ringside fashion at 
every groan and grimace. 

Release date, June 9, 1944 9 minutes 



MOPEY DOPE (Col.) 

Harry Langdon (5423) 

Harry Langdon of the sleepy look and the dif- 
fident manner gets into difficulties again. It's a 
matter of memory this- time. He just can't seem 
to remember his own home or address and, of 
course] makes a very bad guess. His surprised 
but not pleased neighbor arrives just while he's 
in his underwear and misunderstandings lead into 
the chase without which no comedy in this series 
is complete. 

Release date, June 16, 1944 16 minutes 



CARMEN'S VERANDA (20th-Fox) 

Terrytoon (4520) 

Gandy Goose goes musical in this one, and in 
the best classical manner. Tunes and characters 
from more than one opera appear in a story from 
the Olde Days when knights were bold. Boldness, 
of course, is not new to Gandy. It is he who acts 
against the injustice of a threatened marriage by 
force and rescues the maiden from the clutches 
of the villain. .. 

Release date, July 28, 1944 7 minutes 



ROMANCE OF CELLULOID (MGM) 

Anniversary Reel 

To celebrate the 20 years of Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer in J:he motion picture business ,that com- 
pany has compiled a reel of achievements past 
and future. There are shots from the early suc- 
cesses like "Ben Hur," from "The Big Parade," 
from the newsreels of the 'twenties ; followed by 
glimpses of product yet to come. Some of the 
big pictures lined up for next season's release pass 
in review. Scenes from four new Technicolor 
films, "An American Romance," "Bathing Beau- 
ty," "National Velvet," "Kismet" and "Meet Me 
in St. Louis" are presented as coming attractions. 
The present activities of the players and techni- 
cians connected with Leo the Lion are sketched 
in, with particular tribute paid to the man in 
service on the fighting fronts, and the four who 
have given their lives in their country's name. 

The subject is available without charge to ex- 
hibitors. 

1 1 minutes 



Reviews and synopses of short subjects prlnfe 
in Product Digest are indexed in the Short Sal 
jeets Chart, Product Digest Section, pages 1941 
1949. 

Running times are those furnished by the dl 
trlbutor. 



IRAN (Artkino) 

Russian Topical Short 

Of interest to all the United Nations, as th 
short produced in the Kubyishev Newsreel Stud 
will attest, is the strategically located and ei 
dowed country of Iran, formerly Persia. The fil 
opens with scenes of the conference between alli< 
military and political leaders at Teheran, capit 
of Iran. A few brief and well-chosen sequenc 
sketch in some of the history of the country ar 
its people, as background for its role in the presei 
war. The transportation lines, now carrying vit 
goods to the Russians from the industrial plants i 
the West, are of particular interest. But the n; 
tive industries and culture, not too familiar 
American audiences, are given due attention in tl 
course of the film. 

16 minut 



CANADIAN LANDSCAPE (MOI) 

National Film Board of Canada 

, In contrast to the usual releases featuring Cai 
ada and a world at war, here is a film in coli 
treating a purely cultural subject. A. Y. Jacl 
son, one of Canada's best known modern painter 
creates a picture in two telescoped reels. The fir 
conception of the scene is shown when Jacksc 
visits Northern Ontario province for the wooc 
hills. Here he makes his rough sketches, chopsii 
characteristic subjects and interesting groupings j 
trees and hillside. Back in his studio, he sifts tl 
skitches for the most promising and paintabl 
Some of the vivid, finished canvases are shown 
the final sequence. 

The film is at present distributed for non-the 
trical exhibition in 16 mm. 

18 minut 



HEN HOP (MOI) 

National Film Board of Canada 

This short film, also for non-theatrical distribi 
tion in 16 mm, features the music of French Cai 
ada as a background to a novelty cartoon. It 
aimed primarily at the rural sections of that coui 
try where the media of communication are few ai 
the government's message the people must tal 
on new forms. Tk_ jiiort urges the buying of w; 
bonds in fairly sprightly fashion, and is an e: 
ample of the different approaches of the publicis 
for the nation's war needs. 

5 minut. 



UNRRA (MOI) 

National Film Board of Canada 

The letters of the title relate, of course, to tl. 
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Admini 
tration, the combined agency which is plannii 
now for people in a world of peace. This no:, 
theatrical release in 16 mm presents some of I 
present active operations, the supplying of foo 
clothing and medicines to the people in new- 
liberated countries, where the Army of the co' 
queror bad wiped out many provisions and sourc* 
of supply. But it is mainly directed to the gre 
task before the relief Administration when mc 
of Europe will be unable to supply the necessiti 
of life for its people. In this reel the emphai 
is placed on the restoration of agriculture, whe 
armies have laid waste the fields and farms, kill 
the livestock and looted the crops. Countries tl 
have not been battlefields, satelites or Nazi se: 
doms must replenish the earth, the cattle and t 
tools of farming with speed and on a monumen I 
scale. 

15 minu ,\ 

PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 8, H- 



DVANCE SYNOPSES 

in (I information 



iURDER, HE SAYS 
aramount) 

SSOCIATE PRODUCER: E. D. Leshin. 
IRECTOR: George Marshall. PLAYERS: 
•ed MacMurray, Marjorie Main, Mabel Paige, 
;ter Whitney, Porter Hall, Helen Walker, 
an Heather. 

MYSTERY-COMEDY. This is a mixture of 
"ce. comedy, and suspenseful mystery. A public 
inion investigator sets out to sample hill-billy 
oups. He finds a strange assortment of people who 
*ard murder as a form of amusement. Involved 
a spring, whose waters cause the drinker to glow 
the dark. It is responsible for many laughs and a 
i\v deaths. In the end he solves the crimes. 

ECKLESS AGE 
Jniversal) 

SSOCIATE PRODUCER - DIRECTOR: 
elix Feist PLAYERS: Gloria Jean, Judy 
lark, Henry Stephenson, Franklin Pangborn, 
hester Clute, Andrew Tombes. 

COMEDY WITH MUSIC. Gloria Jean plays 
e granddaughter of a wealthy chain store own- 
She runs away to live her own life and takes 
job in one of the stores. In efforts to advance 
ie store's sales she becomes involved in a number 
i hilarious stunts. When her grandfather finds 
er, and it is realized she was selling her own 
nvels, not those stolen from the store, calm is re- 
:ored. 



EARL OF DEATH 
Jniversal) 

'RODUCER-DIRECTOR: Roy William 
Jeill. PLAYERS: Basil Rathbone, Nigel 
Jruce, Evelyn Ankers, Miles Mander, Dennis 
ioey, Richard Nugent, Mary Gordon. 

MYSTERY. The story deals with the theft of 
famous gem which has a history of death and 
lisfortune for all who possess it. Sherlock Holmes, 
ided by Dr. Watson, picks up the trail of the 
hief and his accomplice. A series of bizarre 
.nurders occurs with the detective seeking "The 
Creeper" as the murderer. An exciting climax 
'aves the Pearl of Death and Holmes' life. 



5ABES ON SWING STREET 
Universal) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Bernard Burton. 
DIRECTOR: Edward Lilley. PLAYERS: 
Leon Errol, June Vincent, Peggy Ryan, Ann 
Blyth, Kirby Grant, June Preisser, Alma 
Xruger, Leo Carrillo. 

COMEDY WITH MUSIC. Members of a 
ettlement club open a night club for youngsters 
po raise funds to send ten of their members to 
^usic school. They obtain use of a hall from a 
; ( vealthy man in spite of the objections of his sister 
ind put over their musical entertainment and 
|lancing with great success. 



ROUGHLY SPEAKING 
'Warners) 

PRODUCER: Henry Blanke. DIRECTOR: 
Michael Curtiz. PLAYERS: Rosalind Russell, 
Jack Carson, Donald Woods. 

DRAMA. This is the story of a girl who de- 
cided to be a career woman and whose indepen- 
dence wrecks her first marriage. A second fares 

•better although her children fail to follow the 
chartered paths she had dreamed for them. The 
war takes her sons away to fight and her husband, 

J now a war plant official, to Africa. She decides 
that, although she failed to get just what she 
wanted out of life, she had a lot of fun trying. 

iMOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



GUEST IN THE HOUSE 
(Stromberg-UA) 

PRODUCER: Hunt Stromberg. DIRECTOR: 
Lewis Milestone. PLAYERS: Anne Baxter, 
Ralph Bellamy, Aline MacMahon, Ruth War- 
rick, Marie McDonald, Percy Kilbride, Mar- 
garet Hamilton, Cornel Wilde. 

DRAMA. Anne Baxter plays a paranoiac fian- 
cee of the younger brother of an artist. She plots 
to get the artist away from his wife, sends away 
his brother, alienates the artist from his wife. She 
poisons the mind of the wife's aunt, accuses the 
artist's model of designs on the painter and breaks 
up a lifelong friendship between them and another 
family. Her machinations are revealed in time 
to save the family from disunity. 



ALASKA 
(Monogram) 

PRODUCER: Lindsley Parsons. DIRECTOR: 
George Archainbaud. PLAYERS: Kent Tay- 
lor, Margaret Lindsay, John Carradine, Dean 
Jagger, Iris Adrian, George Cleveland. 

DRAMA. Story is laid in Alaska during the 
gold rush days. Three claim jumpers kill a pros- 
pector. In retaliation, his son* slays two of them. 
He is arrested by the U. S. Marshal, but man- 
ages to free himself and collect evidence of the 
claim-jumper gang operations. Another slaying 
occurs and he is accused, but with the help of his 
dance hall sweetheart manages to extricate him- 
self and implicate the peace officer. 



DEAD MAN'S EYES 
(Universal) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Will Cowan. 
DIRECTOR: Reginald LeBorg. PLAYERS: 
Lon Chaney, Jr., Jean Parker, Paul Kelly, Ed- 
ward Fielding, George Meeker, Burnu Ac- 
quanetta, Jonathan Hale, Thomas Gomez. 

MYSTERY. Lon Chaney, Jr., plays a dual role 
— that of a young artist in love with Jean Parker, 
and a detective, Captain Drury. His eyesight 
ruined by his jealous model, Burnu Acquanetta, 
Chaney is suspected of murdering a man who had 
willed his eyes to him for a transplanting operation. 
After the operation is performed, Chaney pretends 
he has not yet recovered his vision. He and Cap- 
tain Drury trap the real murderer. 



THE MASTER RACE 

(Edward A. Golden - RKO-Radio) 

PRODUCER: Robert S. Golden. DIRECTOR: 
Herbert J. Biberman. PLAYERS: Carl Es- 
mond, Osa Massen, George Coulouris, Nancy 
Gates, Stanley Ridges, Morris Carnovsky, Eric 
Feldary, Richard Nugent, Gavin Muir, Marie 
Lund, Helen Thimig, Paul Guilfoyle. 

DRAMA. The story is laid in Europe at the 
close of the war against the Axis with the United 
Nations busy setting about the liberation and re- 
organization of the once Nazi conquered countries. 
One of the major problems facing the Allies is 
how to keep the Nazis from laying a groundwork 
to repeat their conquests and at the same time win 
the confidence of the liberated peoples. A love 
story involving the daughter of a former Quisling 
and the son of an underground leader is woven 
through the plot. 

DARK WATERS 
[Bogeaus — UA) 

PRODUCER: Benedict Bogeaus. ASSOCI- 
ATE PRODUCER: Joan Harrison. DIREC- 
TOR: Andre DeToth. PLAYERS: Merle 



Oberon, Franchot Tone, Thomas Mitchell, Fay 
Bainter, Alan Napier, Rita Gilman Beery. 

MYSTERY-DRAMA. Suffering severe shock 
over loss of her parents and her own suffering in 
a lifeboat after their ship has been torpedoed, a 
girl arrives to make her home in Louisiana with an 
aunt and uncle she has never seen. A band of 
crooks have taken over the place and substituted a 
pair of character actors for the owners, whom they 
murdered. They attempt to convince the girl she 
is losing her mind so that a young doctor she has 
met will be convinced she is still suffering from her 
harrowing experiences. In the end she escapes with 
the doctor's help, and they manage to get word to 
the sheriff who traps the crooks. 

THE SINGING SHERIFF 
(Universal) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Bernard Burton. 
DIRECTOR: Leslie Goodwins. PLAYERS: 
Bob Crosby, Edward Norris, Fay McKenzie, 
Samuel S. Hinds, Fuzzy Knight, Iris Adrian, 
Doodles Weaver, Max Wagner, Andrew 
Tombes, Joe Sawyer, Rex Lease. 

DRAMA. Actor Bob Richards poses as his 
friend, Butch Masters, and answers the summons of 
Sheriff Masters, who has been shot by outlaws 
and wants to see his son before he dies. Bob 
falls in love with Caroline, the sheriff's daughter, 
cleans out the outlaws, reveals his true identity. 
Caroline returns his love. 

SAN DIEGO, I LOVE YOU 
(Universal) 

PRODUCERS: Michael Fessier. Ernest Pa- 
gano. DIRECTOR: Reginald LeBorg. PLAY- 
ERS: Louise Allbritton, Jon Hall, Edward 
Everett Horton, Florence Lake, Irene Ryan, 
Sarah Selby, Chester Clute. 

COMEDY. Virginia McCooley persuades her 
father to give up his teaching post and go to San 
Diego to promote adoption of his collapsible life 
raft. Enroute they meet a young millionaire. The 
girl uses the family savings for a down payment on 
a mansion to make an impression. When the 
young millionaire, from whom she seeks financing, 
gives her an audience she acquires a black eye due 
to a fall but no one will believe it. 

OBJECTIVE BURMA 
(Warners) 

PRODUCER: Jerry Wald. DIRECTOR: 
Raoul Walsh. PLAYERS: Errol Flynn, Henry 
Hull, James Brown, William Prince. 

WAR DRAMA. This story is laid in Burma 
where General Stillwell's forces are launching a 
flank attack on the Japanese. The commander of 
a group of hard-bitten paratroopers, including 
many of "Vinegar Joe" Stillwell's battle-scarred 
veterans, takes his boys behind Jap lines to de- 
stroy military objectives so that the flanking move- 
ments can be carried on effectively. The story 
deals mainly with the hardships, temperament of 
the men under harrowing jungle attacks, and their 
victories. 

LAND OF THE OUTLAWS 
(Monoqram) 

SUPERVISOR: Charles J. Bigelow. DIREC- 
TOR: Lambert Hillyer. PLAYERS: Johnny 
Mack Brown, Raymond Hatton, Nan Halliday, 
Stephen Keyes, Hugh Prosser, Charles King. 

WESTERN. The two cowboys set out to dis- 
cover why ore shipments are being hijacked. They 
find that a crook is substituting low-grade for good 
ore in an attempt to make the mines look worth- 
less. They foil his plan to acquire the mines for 
little or nothing. 

1983 



RELEASE CHART 

By Companies 



For Stars, Running Time, Review and* erne 
Service Data references, turn to the afpftabetlca 

Re/ease Chart starting on page 1992. Complete 
fisting of 1942-43 Features, by company. In oraV 
of release, may be found on pages T508 one 
7509 of the Product Digest Section in the Augut 
28. 7943 issue. 



COLUMBIA 



Prod. 
No. 



Title 



Release 

Date 



Prod. 

No. 



Title 



Release 
Date 



Prod. Release 
No. Title Date 

5201 Hall tt the Rangers Sep. 16/43 

5031 Doughboys la Ireland Oct. 7/43 

5003 Sahara Ort. 14/43 

5034 Chance »f a Lifetime Oct. 26/43 

5010 It Everybody Happy? Ort. 28/43 

5202 8llv*r City Raiders Not. 4/43 

J024 Return of the Vampire Nov. 11/43 

5017 There'i Something About a 

Soldier Ne». 80/43 

5009 The Heat's Oa Dee. 2/43 

5021 Crime Doctor's Strangest 

Case Dee. 0/43 

5029 Klondike Kate Dee. 16/43 

5203 Cowboy In the Clouds Dee. 23/43 

5005 Wbat a Woman! Deo. 28/43 

5036 The Racket Man Jan. 18/44 

5020 Swing Out the Bluet Jan. 20/44 

5022 Beautiful but Broke Jan. 28/44 

5204 The Vigilantes Ride Feb. 8/44 

5006 None Shall Escape Feb. 3/44 

5220 Cowboy Canteen Feb. 8/44 

5042 The Ghost That Walks Alone. Feb. 10/44 

5018 Nine Glrlt Feb. 17/44 

5038 Sailor's Holiday Feb. 24/44 

5013 Hey Rooklo Mar. 9/44 

5039 Two Man Submarine Mar. 16/44 

5205 Sundown Valley Mar. 23/44 

5032 The Whistler ...Mar. 30/44 

5001 Cover Girl Apr. 6/44 

5015 Jam Session Apr. 13/44 

5028 Girl In the Case Apr. 20/44 

5206 Wyoming Hurricane Apr. 20/44 

5035 Black Paraohute May 4/44 

5004 Once Upon a Time May 11/44 

5041 Underground Guerillas May 18/44 

5207 Rldlne West May 18/44 

5023 Stars on Parade May 25/44 

5010 Address Unknown June I .'44 

5043 They Live in Fear June 15/44 

1208 The Last Horseman June 22/44 

5040 She's a Soldier Too June 29/44 

Louisiana Hayrlde July 13/44 

Secret Command July 20/44 

U-Boat Prisoner July 25. '44 

.... Shadows in the Night July 27/44 

Mr. Winkle Goes to War Aug. 3/44 

Cry of the Werewolf Aug. 17/44 

Death Walks Alone Aug. 17/44 

Cowboy from Lonesome River. Not 8et 

Cyclone Prairie Rangers Not Set 

Saddle Leather Law Not Set 

Untitled Drama Not Set 

.... Sagebrush Heroes Not Set 

Impatient Years Not Set 

Rough Rldln' Justice Not Set 

Carolina Blues Not Set 

.... Kansas City Kitty Not Set 

Tonight and Every Night Not Set 

Swing in the Saddle Not Set 

Ever Since Venus Not Set 

Meet Miss Bobby Socks Not Set 

Stalk the Hunter Not Set 

.... One Mysterious Night Not Set 

.... Return of the Durango Kid.. .Not Set 

Texas Rifles Not Set 

Sergeant Mike Not Set 

The Unknown Not Set 



MGM 



Block 5 

401 Salute to th« Marines 8ep./43 

402 Above Suspicion 8ep./43 

403 I Deed It Sep. .'43 

404 Swing Shift Malsle 0rt./43 

403 Best Foot Forward Ort./43 

406 Adventures of Tartu 0et./43 

407 Dr. Gillespie's Criminal Case Nov./43 

408 Youag Ideas Nov., "43 



409 Girl Crazy Nov.. '43 

418 Lassie Come Horn* De*./43 

411 The Mao from Down Under Dee./4S 

412 Whistling la Brooklyn Doo.,'43 

Block 6 

413 Thousands Cheor J an. ,'44 

414 The Cross of Lorraine Jan.,'44 

415 Lost Angel Jal./44 

490 Madam* Curl* Fob. ,'44 

417 Cry "Havoe" F*b./44 

422 Seng of Russia Fob.. '44 

418 Rationing Mar. .'44 

416 A Guy Named Joe Mar.. '44 

419 Broadway Rhythm Mar.. '44 

420 See Hero, Private Hargrove Mar.. '44 

421 The Heavenly Body Apr./44 

423 Swing Fever Apr./44 

Block 7 

424 Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble May/44 

425 Gaslight May/44 

426 Meet the People May/44 

427 Three Men In White June/44 

428 Two Girls and a Sailor June/44 

Block a 

429 Bathing Beauty July/44 

430 The Canterville Ghost July/44 



466 Tunisian Victory Apr. 28/44 

491 The White Cliffs of Dover June/44 

An American Romance Special 

Dragon Seed Special 

Kismet Not Sot 

Seventh Cross Net 8*4 

Meet Me In 8t. Louis Not Sot 

National Velvet Not Set 

Marriage Is a Private Affair. .Not 8ot 

Secrets In the Dark Not Sot 

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo... Not Set 

Mrs. P&rklngton Not Set 

The Ploture of Dorian Gray.. Not Set 

Gold Town Not Set 

Lost Id a Harem.. Not Set 

Malsle Goes to Reno Net Set 

Ziegfeld Follies Not Set 

Thin Man Goes Home Not Set 

Son of Lassie Not Set 

Cloud Busters Not Set 

Music for Millions Not Set 

Anchors Aweigh Not Set 

The Home Front Not Set 



MONOGRAM 



Melody Pared* Aug. 27/43 

Spotlight Scandals Sop. 14/43 

The Unknown Guest Oct. 22/43 

The Texas Kid Nov. 28/43 

Death Valley Rangers Deo. 8/43 

Mr. Muggt Stem Oat Dee. lt/43 

Women Id Bondage Jan. 14/44 

Where Are Your Children? .. Jan. 17/44 

Westward Bound Jan. 17/44 

The Saltan's Daughter Jan. 24/44 

Raiders *f the Border Jan. 81/44 

Charlie Chan In th* Secret 

Service Feb. 14/44 

Voodoo Man Feb. 21/44 

Million Dollar Kid Feb. 28/44 

Sweethearts of the U.S.A Mar. 18/44 

Arizona Whirlwind Mar. 18/44 

Partners of the Trail Apr. 1/44 

Lady Let's Dance Apr. 15/44 

Hot Ryhthm Apr. 22/44 



Outlaw Trail Apr. 29, 

Law Men May 6, 

Detective Kitty O'Day May 13. 

The Chinese Cat May 20,' 

Follow th* Leader June 3, 

Sonora Stagecoach June 10, 

Return of the Ape Man June 24, 

Range Law July I, 

Johnny Doesn't Live Here 

Any More July 8, 

Are These Our Parents? July 15,' 

Three of a Kind July 22, 

Call of the Jungle July 29, 

Marked Trails July 29, 

Leave It to the Irish Aug. 5. 

West of the Rio Grande Aug. 5, 

Oh, What a Night Aug. 12, 



\Prod. 

No. 



Title 



Release 
Date 



PARAMOUNT 



Block I 



4301 Lot's Face It 

4302 Th* Good Follows. 

4303 Troo U Life 

4304 Tornado 

4305 Hostages 



8PECIAL 
4331 City that Stopped Hitler. 

Block 2 

4306 Henry Aldrlen Haunts a 

Hons* 

4307 Riding High 

4308 Minesweeper 

43OT No Tim* far Low 



Block 3 

4811 Henry Aldrlcb Bay Scout... 

4312 Miracle of Morgan's Creek. 

4313 Timber Qn**n 

4314 Standing Room Only.... 
4318 Th* Uninvited 



SPECIAL 

1338 For Whom the Bell Tolls.. 

4336 Lady In the Dark 

4337 The Story of Dr. Wassell. 
4335 Going My Way 



OWI-WAO 

T3-I The Memphis Belle Apr. 14/441 

Block 4 

4316 The Navy Way 

4317 The Hour Before the Dawn 

4318 You Can't Ration Love 



Block 5 

4321 And the Angels Sing 

4322 Henry Aldrlch Plays Cupid . . . 

4323 Th* Hitler Gang 

4324 Gambler's Choice 

4325 Double Indemnity 

Block 6 

4326 Hall the Conquering Hero 

4327 Take It Big 

4328 Henry Aldrich's Little Secret. 

4329 I Love a Soldier 

4330 The Great Moment 



Our Hearts Were Young and 

Gay Not Set 

Th* Man In Half-Moon Street. Not Set 

Till We Meet Again Not Sot 

Incendiary Blonde Not Set 

Rainbow Island Not Sot 

National Barn Danes? Not 8*t 

Road to Utopia Not Set 

And Now Tomorrow Not Set 

One Body To* Many Not Set 

Bring on the Girls Not 8et 

Practically Yours Not Set 

Murder, He Says Not Set 

Two Years Before the Mast.. Not Set 

Dark Mountain Not Set 

Her Heart in Her Throat Not Set 

Here Come the Waves Not Set 

Kitty Not Set 

A Medal for Benny Not Set 

Out of this World Not Set 

Double Exposure Not Set 



■ . Vi r 



1944-45 

Frenchmen's Creek Not Set 

Ministry of Fear Net Set 



PRC PICTURES 



405 Submarine Bate July 20/4 

401 Isle of Forgotten Sins Ang. IS, "4 

411 Danger! Women at Work Aug. 23/4 

459 Blazing Frontier Sep. 1/4 

408 Tiger Fangs Sap. 10/4! 

412 The Girl from Monterrey Oct. 4/4 

451 Return of the Rangers Oct. 28/4 

460 Devil Riders Nov. 8/4 

452 Boss of Rawhide Nov. 20/4 

402 Harvest Melody Nov. 22/4 

407 Jive Junction Dee. 20/4 

461 The Drifter Deo. 20/4! 

453 Gunsmoko Mesa Jan. 8/4 

403 Career Girl Jan. 11/4 

408 Nabonga Jan. 25/4 

464 Outlaw Roundup Fab. 10/4 

409 Men en Her Mind Fob. 12/4 

462 Frontier Outlaws Mar. 4/4 

414 Lady In th* Death House Mar. 15/4 

463 Thundering Gun Sllngors Mar. 25/4 

413 The Amazing Mr. Forrest Mar. 29/4 

455 Guns of the Law Apr. 10/4 

419 The Monster Maker Apr. 15/4 

422 Shako Hands With Murder Apr. 22/4 

456 The Pinto Bandit Apr. 27/4 

420 Men of the Sea Apr. 30/4 

464 Valley of Vengeance May 5/4 

418 The Contender May 10/4 

457 Spook Town June 3/4 

415 Waterfront Juno 10/4 

404 Minstrel Man July 1/4 

416 Delinquent Daughters July 15/4 

417 Seven Doors to Death July 25/4 

465 Fuzzy Settles Down July 25/4 

458 Brand of the Devil July 30/4 

421 Machine Gun Mama Aug. 2/4 

466 Rustler's Hideout Sep. 2/4 



i ' 

;RKO 

■ - 

Block I 

! 401 The Fallen Sparrow 

• 402 Adventures of a Rooklo 

t 403 The Seventh Vlrtlm 

I 404 So This Is Washington 

'405 A Lady Takes a Chanoe I 



[ 



1984 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 8, 194 



Titlt 



Datt 



Block 2 



The Iran Majar 

Gangway far Tomorrow 

Government Slrl 

Glldsrsleeve ao Broadway.. 
The Faleen and ttie Coeds. 



SPECIAL 



The North Star 

Up In Arras 

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (R). 
Goyeseas 



Biatk 3 



Around the World 

The Ghett Skip 

Tarzaii'i Desert Mystery . 

Rookies In Barma 

Hlgker aad Hlghar 



Black 4 



> Tender Comrade .*} . . 

' Passport ta Destiny 

3 Carta of the Cat People. 

3 Eseapo ta Danger 

D Action la Arabia 



Block 5 

1 The Falcon Out West 

2 Days of Glory .' 

3 Yellow Canary 

4 Seven Days Ashore 

5 Show Business 



Block 8 



: Gildersleove's Ghost .. 

7 Marina Raiders 

!8 A Night of Adventure. 

9 Step Lively 

30 Youth Runs Wild 



Casanova Brown Not Set 

Heavenly Days Not Set 

None but the Lonely Heart. . Not Set 

The Falcon In Mexico Not Set 

The Silent Boll Not Set 

Musie in Manhattan Not Set 

Bride by Mistake Not Set 

Belle of the Yukon Not Sot 

The Woman In the Window. . Not Sot 
The Princess and the Pirate. . Not Set 

Tall In the Saddle Not Set 

Farewell. My Lovely Not Set 

Having Wonderful Crime Not Set 

My Pal, Wolf Not Set 

Master Race Not Set 

The Girl Rush Not Set 

The Brighton Strangler Not Set 



REPUBLIC 



u 

361 Fugltlva from Sentra July 

301 Tka Saint Meats the Tiger ...July 

362 Blaak Hill. Express) Aug. 

302 Hoaalar Holiday See. 

351 Beyond the Last Frontier. .. .Sep. 

" 375 Death Valley Manhunt Sep. 

"333 Man Irons tka Rio Grande... Oct 
'303 Hera Cesses Elmer Nov. 

376 Overland Mall Robbery Nov. 

306 Tka Oeerslayer Nov. 

364 Mystery Broadcast Nov. 

305 Drams of Fu Manehn Nov. 

364 Canyon City Nov. 

307 In Old Oklahoma Daa. 

316 Pistol Paakla' Mama Dae. 

352 Raiders of Sunset Pasa Deo. 

365 California Joa Deo. 

309 Whispering Footsteps Deo. 

306 O, My Darling Clementine ..Dee. 

353 Prlda of the Plains Jan. 

341 Hands Acres* tka Border Jan. 

3301 Rootln,' Tootln' Rkytkm(R) . . Jan. 
■002 Womea In War (R) Jan. 

333 Casanova In Burlesque Fab. 

3302 The Big Show (R) Mar. 

354 Benaatk Western Skies Mar. 

311 Tha Flgktlng Baaboat Mar. 

377 Mo jay. Firebrand Mar, 

312 My Best Gal Mar. 



I. '43 
2JV43 
15/43 
ia.'43 
IS, '43 
25,'43 
18743 
15/43 
20/43 
22/43 
23/43 
27, '43 
29/43 
6/43 
15/43 
20/43 
29/43 
50/43 
SI/43 
5/44 
5/44 
15/44 
25/44 
19/44 
1/44 
S/44 
10/44 
19/44 
28/44 



Prod. 
No. 



Title 



Jttlttjf 
Datt 



378 Hidden Valley Outlaws Apr. J/44 

355 Tha Laramie Trail Apr. 3/44 

366 Outlaws of Santa Fa Apr. 4/44 

313 Rosle the Riveter Apr. 9/44 

3303 Oh, Susanna (R) Apr. 15/44 

315 The Lady and tha Monster. . .Apr. 17/44 

314 Trooadero Apr. 24/44 

318 Jamboree May (,'44 

342 Cewboy and the Senorlta May 12/44 

3311 Tucson Raiders May 14/44 

3304 Melody Trail (R) June 1/44 

317 Silent Partner June 9/44 

320 Goodnight Sweetheart June 17/44 

343 Yellow Rose of Texas June 24/44 

318 Man from Frisco July 1/44 

3312 Marshall of Reno July 2/44 

319 Call of the South Seas July 7/44 

356 Call of the Rockies July 14/44 

3305 Comm' Round the 

Mountain (R) July 15/44 

321 Secrets of Scotland Yard July 26/44 

344 Song of Nevada Aug. 5/44 

322 The Girl Who Dared Aug. 5/44 

324 Port of 40 Thieves Aug. 13/44 

1944-45 

461 Silver City" Kid July 20/44 

Storm Over Lisbon Not Set 

Sing, Neighbor, Sing Not Set 

Atlantlo City Not Set 

Brazil Not Set 

Three Little Sisters Not Set 

Bordertown Trails Not Set 

Stagecoach to Monterey Not Set 

San Antonio Kid Not Set 

Strangers in the Night Not Set 

Cheyenne Wildcat Not Set 

San Fernando Valley Not Set 

Sheriff of Sundown Not Set 

That's My Baby Not Set 

My Buddy Not Set 

Code of the Prairie Not Set 

Man of Mystery Not Set 

Flame of Barbary Coast Not Set 

Lights of Old Monterey Not Set 

Firebrands of Arizona Not Set 



20TH-FOX 



401 Bomber's Moon Aug. 6/43 

402 Heaven Can Walt Aug. 13/43 

403 Holy Matrimony Aug. 27/43 

404 Claudia Sep. 3/43 

405 Wintertime Sep. 17/43 

408 8weet Rosle O'Grady Oct. 1/43 

409 Paris After Dark Oct 15/43 

406 In Old Chleago (R) Oct. 29/43 

407 Banjo en My Knee (R) Oct 29/43 

412 Guadalcanal Diary Nov. 5/43 

414 Tke Battle ef Russia Nov. 5/43 

413 Dancing Masters Nov. 19/43 

410 Tke Rains Came (R) Nov. 26/43 

411 Under Two Flags (R) Nov. 28/43 

415 Happy Land Dee. S/43 

418 Tke Gang's All Hera Dee. 24/43 

417 The Lodger Jan. 7/44 

418 Uneensored Jan. 11/44 

419 Lifeboat .....Jan. tt/44 

420 Jane Eyre Feb.. '44 

421 Tke 8ulllvan* Feb., '44 

422 Tha Purple Heart Mar./44 

423 Four Jills In a Jeep Mar./44 

424 Buffalo Bill Apr./44 

425 Tampleo Anr./44 

426 Shrine of Victory Apr./44 

427 Pin Up Girl May '44 

428 Bermuda Mystery May '44 

429 Eve of St. Mark June '44 

430 Ladies of Washington June '44 

431 Roger Touhy, Gangster July '44 

432 Candlelight in Algeria July '44 

433 Homo in Indiana July '44 

SPECIAL 

Song of Bemadette Not Set 

1944-45 

.... Greenwich Village Not Set 

.... Wilson Not Set 

In the Meantime, Darling Net Set 

Sweet and Low Down Not Set 

Keys of the Kingdom Not Sot 

.... Irish Eyes Are Smiling Not Stt 

.... The Big Noise Not Set 



Prod. 
No. 



Titlt 



Ittlttus 
Datt 



Something for the Boys Not Set 

Laura Not Set 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. . .Not Set 
Wing and a Prayer Not Set 

Thunderhead Not Set 

Take It or Leave It Not Set 

Winged Victory Not Set 



UNITED ARTISTS 

.... Yanka Akoy July l.'*3 

.... Tkat Nazty Nuisance Aug. 6/43 

.... Vletery Through Air Power... Aug. 13/43 

.... HI Diddle Diddle Aug. 20/43 

.... Johnny Come Lately Sep. 8/43 

.... Tke Kanaan Sep. 10/43 

Bar SO Ott 1/43 

.... False Colors No*. 5/43 

Riders ef tke Deadline.. Dot. 8/43 

.... Jack London Dee. 24/43 

.... woman of tke Town Dee. 81/43 

.... Three Russian Girls Jan. 14/44 

.... Bridge ef San Luis Rey Feb. 11/44 

Texas Masquerade Feb. 18/44 

.... Knickerbocker Holiday Mar. 17/44 

It Happened Tomorrow Apr. 7/44 

.... Voice In the Wind Apr. 21/44 

.... Lumber Jack Apr. 28/44 

Up in Mabel's Room Apr. 28/44 

.... Mystery Man May 31/44 

Sons of the Open Road June 2/44 

.... Tke Hairy Ape June 16/44 

Forty Thieves June 23/44 

.... Sensations of 1945 Juno 30/44 

Summer Storm July 14/44 

Abroad with Two Yanks Aug. 4/44 

Double Furlough Not Set 

.... Dark Waters Not Set 

Since Yos) Went Away Not Set 

.... Story of G.I. Joe Not Set 

Guest In the House Not Sot 

.... Three's a Family Not Set 

Tomorrow the World Not Set 

The Great John L Not Set 



UNIVERSAL 



8017 Fired Wife Sep. 8/43 

6022 Strange Death of Adolf Hltler.Sep. 10/43 

8028 Larceny with Mutlt Sep. 10/43 

8024 Sherlock Helmet Faces Death. Sep. 17/43 
8009 Top Man Sep. 17/43 

8081 Arizona Trail Sea. 14/43 

8023 Always a Bridesmaid Sep. 24/43 

8007 Corvette K-225 Ott 1/43 

8005 Crazy House Ott (.'43 

8035 Hi Ya Sailor Ott 15/43 

8033 You're a Lucky Fellow, 

Mr. Smith Oct. 22/43 

3082 Fletk aad Fantasy Oct 29/43 

8019 Son of Dratula Nov. 5/43 

8082 Frontier Law Nov. 5/43 

8038 Tke Mad Ghoul Nov. 12/43 

8030 Never a Dull Moment Nov. 19/43 

8004 Hit Butler's Sister Nov. 28/43 

8042 So't Your Unelo Dee. (,'43 

8041 8he't for Mo Deo. 10/43 

8028 Calling Dr. Death Dee. 17/43 

B025 Moonlight In Vermont Deo. 24/43 

8064 Gung Ha Doe. 81/43 

S034 Sing a Jingle Jan. 7/44 

8003 Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves. Jan. 14/44 
9021 Spider Woman Jan. 21/44 

8083 Marshal of Gunsmokt Jan. 21/44 

8014 Phantom Lady Jan. 28/44 

3020 Swlngtlme Johnny Feb. 4/44 

8060 The Impostor Feb. 11/44 

8029 Weekend Pats Feb. 18/44 

8011 Chip Off the Old Block Feb. 25/44 

8031 Hat-Check Honey Mar. 10/44 

8084 Oklahoma Raiders Mar. 17/44 

8065 Ladlet Courageous Mar. 17/44 

8044 HI Good-Lookin* Mar. 24/44 

8027 Weird Woman Apr. 14/44 

8016 Her Primitive Man Apr. 21/44 

8037 Moon Over Las Vegas Apr. 28/44 

8036 Slightly Terrific May 5/44 

3006 Cobra Woman May 12/44 

8032 Pardon My Rhythm May 19/44 

8019 Tha Scarlet Claw May 26/44 

8085 Boss of Boom Town May 26/44 

8012 This Is. tha Life June 2/44 

Tht Invisible Man's 

Revenge June 9/44 



Prod. 
No. 



Titlt 



RtltOJ* 
Dot* 



8086 



3087 
8061 



Ghost Catchers '.June 16/44 

South of Dixie Juno 23/44 

Christmas Holiday June 30/44 

Trigger Trail July 7/44 

The Mummy's Ghost July 7/44 

Jungle Woman July 7/44 

Twilight on the Prairie July 14/44 

Allergic to Love July 21/44 

Trail to Gunsight Aug. 18/44 

Follow the Boys Not Set 

1944-45 

Gypsy Wildcat Sep. 1/44 

Moonlight and Cactus Sep. 9,'44 

The Merry Monahans Sep. 15/44 

Pearl of Death Sep. 22/44 

San Diego, I Love You Sep. 29/44 

The Singing Sheriff Oct. 6/44 

See My Lawyer ...Oct. 13/44 

The Climax Oct 20/44 

Babes on Swing Street Oct. 27/44 

Bowery to Broadway Nov. 3/44 

Dead Man's Eyes Nov. 10/44 

Reckless Age Nov. 17/44 

The Suspect Nov. 24/44 

Patrick the Great Not Set 

Murder In the Blue Room Not Set 

The Devil's Brood Not Set 

House of Fear Not Set 

Queen of the Nile Not Set 

Riders of Santa Fe Not Set 

Can't Help Singing Not Set 

In Society Not Set 

My Baby Loves Music Not Set 

The Frozen Ghost Not Set 

The Old Texas Trail Not Set 



WARNER BROS. 

301 Wateh en tka Rhine Sop. 4/43 

330 Oklahoma Kid (R) Sep. 11/43 

302 Murder en the Waterfront Sep. 18/43 

303 Thank Your Lucky Stars Sep. 25/43 

331 Song of tke Saddle (R) Oct 2/43 

332 Prairie Tkuador (R) Oct. S/43 

333 Cherokee Strip (R) Oct. 2/43 

334 Empty Holsten (R) Ott. 2/43 

335 Gunt of the Pecos (R) Oct 2/43 

336 Land Beyond the Law (R)...0«t J/43 

304 Adventure In Iraq Ott, 0/43 

305 Prlncett O'Rourke Ott 23/43 

308 Find the Blackmailer Nov. 6/43 

307 Northern Pursuit Nov. 13/43 

308 Old Acquaintance Nov. 27/43 

327 Crime School (R) Dee. 4/43 

328 Girls en Probation (R) Doe. 4/43 

309 Destination, Tokyo Jan. 1/44 

310 The Desert Song Jan. 29/44 

311 In Our Time Feb. 19/44 

325 Frisco Kid (R) Mar. 4/44 

312 Passage to Marseille Mar. 11/4 « 

313 Shine On, Harvest Moon Apr. 8/4-. 

314 Uncertain Glory Apr. 22/44 

316 Between Two Worlds May 20/44 

317 Make Your Own Bed June 10/44 

318 Mask of Dimltrios July 1/44 

341 Manpower (R) July 15/44 

342 They Made Me a Criminal (R)July 15/44 

343 Brother Rat (R) July 15/44 

344 The Walking Dead (R) July 15/44 

345 Tiger Shark (R) July 15/44 

346 Polo Joe (R) July 15/44 

315 Adventures of Mark Twain July 22/44 

319 Mr. Skeffington Aug. 12/44 

1944-45 

Arsenic and Old Lace Not Stt 

.... Crime by Night Not Set 

Devotion Net Set 

.... The Last Ride Not Set 

Saratoga Trunk Not Set 

.... Conflict Not Bet 

Rhapsody In Blue .....Not Set 

.... The Hern Blows at Midnight. Not Set 

The Animal Kingdom Net Sot 

My Reputation Not Set 

Cinderella Jones Not Set 

.... Janle Not Set 

The Doughgirls Not Set 

To Have and Have Not Not Set 

.... The Very Thought of You. .. .Not Set 

Roughly Speaking Not. Set 

Objective Burma Not. Set 

.... The Conspirators Not Set 

The Corn Is Green Not Set 

Strangers In Our Midst Not Set 

Christmas in Connecticut Not Set 

Hollywood Canteen Not Set 



.MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



1985 



THE RELEASE CHART 

Index to Reviews, Advance Synopses and 
Service Data in PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION 

Release dates and running time are furnished as soon as avail- Legion of Decency Rating, Audience Classification and Managers' 

able. Advance dates are tentative and subject to change. Run- Round Table Exploitation. 

ning times are the official times supplied by the distributor. short Sub j ects Chart with Synopsis Index can be found on 

All page numbers on this chart refer to pages in the pages 1972-1973. 

PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION of MOTION PICTURE HERALD. Feature p roduct , nduding Co ming Attractions, listed by Com- 

Consult Service Data in the PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION for pany, in order of release, on pages 1984-1985. 



REVIEWED — v 















M. P. 


Product 


Advance 


Service 






Prod. 




Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synapsis 


Data 


Title < 


Company 


Number 


Stars 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Page 


ABOVE Suspicion 


MGM 


402 


Joan Crawford-Fred MacMurray 


Sept.,'43 


■ 90m 


May 1/43 


1546 


1081 


1575 


Abroad with Two Yanks 


UA 




William Bendix-Dennis O'Keefe 


Aug. 4,'44 








1889 




Action in Arabia 


RKO 


420 


George Sanders-Virginia Bruce 


Block 4 


75m 


Feb. 19/44 


1762 


1746 


1847 


Address Unknown 


Col. 


5010 


Paul Lukas-Mady Christians 


June l,'44 


72m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1695 


1947 


Adventure in Iraq 


WB 


304 


John Loder-Ruth Ford 


Oct. 9,'43 


64m 


Sept. 25/43 


1553 


1530 




Adventure in Music 


Crystal 




Classical Music Feature 


Mar. 10/44 


62m 


Mar. 25/44 


1814 






Adventures of a Rookie 


P.KO 


402 


Wally Brown-Alan Carney 


Block 1 


64m 


Aug. 2 1/43 


1547 


1471 


1617 


Adventures of Mark Twain 


WB 


315 


Fredric March-Alexis Smith 


July 22,"44 


130m 


May 6/44 


1877 


936 


1947 


Adventures of Tartu (British) 


MGM 


406 


Robert Donat-Valerie Hobson 


Oct.,'43 


103m 


Aug. 7/43 


1546 




1655 


Alaska 


Mono. 




Kent Taylor-Margaret Lindsay 


Not Set 






1983 




All Baba and 40 Thieves (color 


) Univ. 


8003 


Jon Hall-Maria Montez 


Jan. I4,'44 


87m 


Jan. 15/44 


1713 


1457 


1902 


Allergic to Love 


Univ. 




Martha O'Driscoll-Noah Beery, Jr. 


July 21, "44 


66m 


May 6/44 


1877 






Always a Bridesmaid 


Univ. 


8023 


Andrew Sisters-Patric Knowles 


Sept. 24, '43 


61m 


Oct. 2/43 


1566 


1 192 




Amazing Mr. Forrest, The (Br.) PRC 


413 


Edward E. Horton-Jack Buchanan 


Mar. 29/44 


71m 






1747 




American Romance, An (color) MGM 




Brian Donlevy-Ann Richard 


Special 


I5lm 


July 1/44 


1969 


1457 




And Now Tomorrow 


Para. 




Loretta Young-Alan Ladd 


1944-45 






1715 




And the Angels Sing 


Para. 


432 ( 


Fred MacMurray-Dorothy Lamour 


Block 5 


96 m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1555 




Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble 


MGM 


424 


Mickey Rooney-Lewis Stone 


May,'44 


107m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1456 


1947 


Animal Kingdom, The 


WB 




Ann Sheridan-Olivia de Havilland 


1944-45 








1431 




Are These Our Parents? 


Mono. 




Helen Vinson-Lyle Talbot 


July I5,'44 


73 m 


June 17/44 


1945 


1923 




Arizona Trail 


Univ. 


808! 


Tex Ritter-Fuzzy Knight 


Sept. 24.'43 


57m 






1545 




Arizona Whirlwind 


Mono. 




Ken Maynard-Hoot Gibson 


Mar. 18/44 


59m 


Apr. 15/44 


1845 


1746 




Around the World 


RKO 


41 i 


Kay Kyser-Joan Davis-Mischa Auer 


Block 3 


81m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1457 


1902 


Arsenic and Old Lace 


WB 




Cary Grant-Raymond Massey 


1944-45 








1806 




Atlantic City 


Rep. 




Constance Moore-Bradford Taylor 


Not Set 








1899 




Attack OWI-RKO 




War Documentary 


June 12/44 


56m 


June 10/44 


1933 






BABES on Swing Street, 




















1944-45 


Univ. 


• • • • 


Leon nrrol-June Vincent 


Oct. 27, 44 








1 OQ*3 
1 TOO 




Banjo on My Knee (R.) 


20th-Fox 


407 


Barbara Stanwyck-Joel McCrea 


Oct. 29, 43 


nc 

Vbrn 


Dec. b, So 


1 coc 
1903 






Bar 20 


UA 


• ■ • ■ 


William Boyd-Andy Clyde 


i-\ . n 0... 

Oct. i , 43 


94m 


I.J.. *)A ^A'i 

July *4, 43 


1 ceo 






Bathing Beauty (color) 


MGM 


429 


n j c I li r_ aL \a/.|i* 
Red Skelton-tsther Williams 


1 1 'A A 

July, 44 


1 0 1 m 


I ~) ' A A 

June S, 44 




1 039 




Battle of China, The War Dept. 




Documentary 


Not Set 


65 m 


May 20/44 


1897 






Battle of Russia 


20th-Fox 


414 


Documentary 


Nov. 5/43 


80m 


Nov. 6/43 


1615 




1766 


Beautiful But Broke 


Col. 


5022 


Joan Davis-Jane Frazee 


Jan. 28/44 


74m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 


1696 




Beautiful Michoacan (Mex.) 


Mohme 




Tito Guizar-Gloria Marin 


Apr. 25/44 


106m 


May 6/44 


1878 






Belle of the Yukon (color) 


RKO 




Randolph Scott-Gypsy Rose Lee 


Not Set 








1835 




Beneath Western Skies 


Rep. 


354 


Bob Livingston-Smiley Burnett© 


Mar. 3/44 


56m 


May 20/44 


1898 


1746 




Bermuda Mystery 


20th-Fox 


428 


Preston Foster-Ann Rutherford 


May/44 


65 m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1835 




Best Foot Forward (color) 


MGM 


405 


Lucille Ball-William Gaxton 


Oct.,'43 


94m 


July 3/43 


1532 


1191 


1617 


Between Two Worlds 


WB 


316 


John Garfield-Paul Henreid 


May 20/44 


112m 


May 13/44 


1885 


1646 




Beyond the Last Frontier 


Rep. 


351 


Eddie Dew-Smiley Burnette 


Sept. 18/43 


55m 


Sept. 1 1 ,'43 


1529 






Big Show, The (Reissue) 


Rep. 


3302 


Gene Autry 


Mar. 1/44 


71m 










Black Hills Express 


Rep. 


362 


Don Barry-Wally Vernon 


Aug. 15/43 


55m 


Aug. 7/43 


1546 


1457 




Black Parachute, The 


Col. 


5035 


John Carradine-Larry Parks 


May 4/44 


65 m 


June 17/44 


1946 


1806 




Blazing Frontier 


PRC 


459 


Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 


' Sept. f/43 


59m 


Apr. 15/44 


1845 


1531 




Bombers Moon 


20th-Fox 


401 


George Montgomery-Annabella 


Aug. 6/43 


70m 


July 10/43 


1532 


1305 




Boss of Boom Town 


Univ. 


8085 


Rod Cameron-Vivian Austin 


May 26/44 








1923 




Boss of Rawhide 


PRC 


452 


Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 


Nov. 20/43 


59m 






1599 




Bowery to Broadway, 1944-45 


Univ. 




Contract Players 


Nov. 3/44 








1923 




Brand of the Devil 


PRC 


458 


Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 


July 30/44 








1923 




Brazil 


Rep. 




Virginia Bruce-Tito Guizar 


Not Set 








1971 




Bride by Mistake 


RKO 




Laraine Day-Alan Marshall 


Not Set 








1890 




(formerly That Hunter Girl 


) 
















Bridge of San Luis Rey, The 


UA 




Lynn Bari-Akim Tamiroff 


Feb. 11/44 


107m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 


1636 


1947 


Bring On the Girls (color) 


Para. 




Veronica Lake-Sonny Tufts 


1944-45 








1763 




Broadway Rhythm (color) 


MGM 


419 


George Murphy-Ginny Simms 


Mar./44 


1 15m 


Jan. 22/44 


1725 


1616 


1947 


Brother Rat (Reissue) 


WB 


343 


Priscilla Lane-Wayne Morris 


July 15/44 


89m 


Oct. 15/38 


1957 






Buffalo Bill (color) 


20th-Fox 


424 


Maureen O'Hara-Joel McCrea 


Apr./44 


90m 


Mar. 18/44 


1801 


1531 


1947 


CALIFORNIA j oe 


Rep. 


365 


Don Barry-Helen Talbot 


Dec. 29/43 


55m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1675 




Call of the Jungle 


Mono. 




Ann Corio-James Bush 


July 29/44 








1913 




Call of the Rockies 


Rep. 


356 


Smiley Burnette-Sonny Carson 


July 14/44 


57 m 


June 10/44 


1934 


1923 




Call of the South Seas 


Rep. 


319 


Janet Martin-Allan Lane 


July 7/44 








1899 




Calling Dr. Death 


Univ. 


8026 


Lon Chaney-Patricia Morison 


Dec. 17/43 


63 m 


Dec. 18/43 


1673 


1635 




Candlelight in Algeria (Br.) 


20th-Fox 


432 


James Mason-Carla Lehmann 


July/44 


85m 


Jan. 1/44 


1694 






Candles at Nine (British) Nat'l-Anglo 




Jessie Matthews 


Not Set 


86m 


July 1/44 


1970 






Canterbury Tale (British) Eagle-Lion 




Eric Portman-Sheila Sim 


Not Set 




May 13/44 


1885 







1986 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 8, 1944 



r— REVIEWED — \ 
M. P. Product Advtm Service 







rroa. 




D 1 

Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synopsis 


Data 


Title 


Company 


Number 


Stars 


Hate 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Page 


all /— . 1 1 TL 

Cantemlle Ghost, The 


MGM 


430 


Charles Laughton-Margaret O Brien 


July,'44 


95m 


May 27/44 


1909 


1635 




Canyon C^ty 


Rep. 


364 


Don Barry-Helen Talbot 


Nov. 29/43 


55m 


Nov. la/43 


1626 


1599 




Career Girl 


PRC 


403 


Frances Langford-Craig Wood 


Jan. 1 1 ,'44 


69m 


- Dec. 18/43 


1674 


1634 




Carolina Blues 


Col. 




Kay Kyser-Ann Miller-Victor Moore 


Not Set 








1899 




(formerly Battleship Blues) 


















Casanova Brown 


RKO 




Gary Cooper-Teresa Wright 


Not Set 








1806 




Casanova in Burlesque 


Rep. 


333 


Joe E. Brown-June Havoc 


Feb. I9,'44 


72m 


Jan. 29/44 


1733 


1676 




Chance of a Lifetime, The 


Col. 


5034 


Chester Morris-Jeanne Bates 


Oct. 26,'43 


65m 


Oct. 16/43 


1586 


1545 




Charlie Chan in Secret Service 


Mono. 




Sidney Toler-Gwen Kenyon 


Feb. I4,'44 


65m 


Jan. 15/44 


1714 


1599 




Charlie Chan in The Chinese Cat Mono. 




Sidney Toler-Joan Woodbury 


May 20,'44 


65 m 


Apr. 1 ,'44 


1826 






Cherokee Strip (Reissue) 


WB 


333 


Dick Foran 


Oct. 2,'43 


56m 








Chip Off the Old Block 


Univ. 


801 1 


Donald O Connor-Peggy Ryan 


Feb. 25,'44 


81m 


Feb. 19/44 


1761 


1715 


1902 


Christmas Holiday 


Univ. 




Deanna Durbin-Gene Kelly 


June 30,'44 


92m 


June 10/44 


1934 


1695 




Cinderella Jones 


WB 




Joan Leslie-Robert Alda 


1944-45 








1746 




City That Stopped Hitler 


Para. 


4331 


Russian Documentary 


Special 


57 m 


Sept. 4/43 


1521 




1655 


Claudia 


20th-Fox 


404 


Dorothy McGuire-Robert Young 


Sept. 3. '43 


91m 


Aug. 21/43 


1558 




1655 


Climax, The (color), 1944-45 


Univ. 




Susanna Foster-Boris Karloff 


Oct. 20/44 






1786 




Cobra Woman (color) 


Univ. 


8006 


Jon Hall-Maria Montez 


May 12/44 


70m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1457 


1655 


Comin' Round the Mountain 
















(Reissue) 


Rep. 


3305 


Gene Autry 


July 15/44 












Conflict 


WB 




Humphrey Bogart-Alexis Smith 


1 944-45 








1456 




Conspirators, The 


WB 




Hedy Lamarr-Paul Henreid 


1944-45 








1850 




Contender, The 


PRC 


418 


Buster Crabbe-Arline Judge 


May 10/44 


66m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1850 




Corvette K-225 


Univ. 


8007 


Randolph icott-James Brown 


Oct 1/43 


99m 


Oct. 2/43 


1565 


1240 


1719 


Cover Girl (color) 


Col. 


5001 


Rita Hayworth-Gene Kelly 


Apr. 6/44 


107m 


Mar. 1 1/44 


1793 


1416 


1947 


Cowboy Canteen 


Col. 


5220 


Charles Starrett-Jane Frazee 


Feb. 8/44 


72m 


Feb. 26/44 


1774 


1763 




Cowboy in the Clouds 


Col. 


5203 


Charles Starrett-Julie Duncan 


Dec. 23/43 


55m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1636 




Cowboy and the Senorita, The Rep. 


342 


Koy Rogers-Dale Evans-Mary Lee 


May 12/44 


78m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1747 




Crazy House 


Univ. 


8005 


Olsen and Johnson 


Oct. 8/43 


80m 


Oct. 23/43 


1595 


1531 


1719 


Crime by Night 


WB 




Jane Wyman-Jerome Cowan 


1 944-45 








1091 




Crime Doctor's Strangest Case Col. 


5021 


Warner Baxter-Lynn Merrick 


Dec. 9/43 


68m 


Jan. 22/44 


1725 


1654 




Crime School (Reissue) 


WB 


327 


Humphrey Bogart-Dead End Kids 


Dec. 4/43 


86m 


May 7/38 


1626 






Cross of Lorraine, The 


MGM 


414 


Pierre Aumont-Gene Kelly 


Jan.,'44 


90m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


1457 


1719 


Cry "Havoc" 


MGM 


417 


Margaret Sullavan-Ann Sothern 


Feb./44 


97m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1555 




Cry of the Werewolf 


Col. 




Osa Massen-Stephen Crane 


Aug. 17/44 








1958 




Curse of the Cat People 


RKO 


418 


Simone Simon-Kent Smith 


Block 4 


70m 


Feb. 19/44 


1762 


1715 




DANCING Masters, The 


20th-Fox 


413 


Laurel and Hardy 


Nov. 19/43 


63 m 


Oct. 30/43 


1605 


1555 




Danger! Women at Work 


PRC 


41 1 


ni 1/ II h a r» • 

Patsy Kelly-Mary Brian 


Aug. 23/43 


61m 


July 17/43 


1426 






Dark Waters 


UA 




Merle Oberon-Franchot Tone 


Not Set 








1983 




Days of Glory 


RKO 


422 


Tamara Toumanova-Gregory Peck 


Block 5 


86m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1636 




Dead Men's Eyes, 1944-45 


Univ. 




Lon Chaney-Jean Parker 


• Nov. 10/44 






1983 




Death Valley Manhunt 


Rep. 


375 


n*ll r~ 1 1 • ii s— II ii 

Bill Elliott-Gabby Hayes 


Sept. 25/43 


55m 


Aug. 28/43 


1558 


1402 




Death Valley Rangers 


Mono. 




Hoot Gibson-Ken Maynard 


Dec. 3/43 


59m 


Dec. 18/43 


1674 


1555 




Death Walks Alone 


Col. 




Rose Hobart-William Wright 


Aug. 17/44 








1958 




Deerslayer, The 


Rep. 


306 


n i/ ii I rs t 

Bruce Kellogg-Jean Parker 


Nov. 22/43 


67m 


Nov. 6/43 


1615 


1599 




Delinquent Daughters 


PRC 


416 


June Carlson-Fifi D'Orsay 


July 15/44 


72m 


July 8/44 


1981 


1913 




Desert Song, The (color) 


WB 


310 


Dennis Morgan-Irene Manning 


Jan. 29/44 


96m 


Dec. 18/43 


1673 


872 


1818 


Destination, Toyko 


WB 


309 


Cary Grant-John Garfield 


Jan. 1/44 


135m 


Dec. 25/43 


1685 


1530 


1847 


Detective Kitty O'Day 


Mono. 




Jean Parker-Tim Ryan 


May 13/44 


63 m 


Apr. 1/44 


1826 






Devil Riders, The 


PRC 


460 


Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 


Nov. 5/43 


58m 


Feb. 12/44 


1754 


1566 




Dixie Jamboree 


PRC 




f i r i t/ ■ i i 

trances Langtord-Guy Kibbee 


1 944-45 








1835 




Double Furlough 


UA 




Ginger Rogers-Joseph Cotten 


Not Set 








1913 




(formerly With All My Heart) 


















Double Indemnity 


Para. 


4325 


Barbara Stanwyck-Fred MacMurray 


Block 5 


106m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1646 




Doughboys in Ireland 


Col. 


5031 


Kenny Baker-Jeff Donnell 


Oct. 7/43 


61m 


Oct. 9/43 


1574 


1545 




Doughgirls, The 


WB 




Ann Sheridan-Alexis Smith 


1944-45 








1835 




Dragon Seed 


MGM 




Katharine Hepburn-Walter Huston 


Special 








1675 




Drifter, The 


PRC 


461 


Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 


Dec. 20/43 


62 m 


May 27/44 


1910 


1606 




Dr. Gillespie's Criminal Case 


MGM 


407 


Lionel Barrymore-Van Johnson 


Nov./43 


89m 


May 8/43 


1546 


1 192 




Dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels 


Frank 




Paul Andor-Claudia Drake-Donald Woods Not Set 








1599 




Drums of Fu Manchu 


Rep. 


305 


Henry Brandon- William Royle 


Nov. 27/43 


68m 


Nov. 13/43 


1626 


1606 




EMPTY Holsters (Reissue) 


WB 


334 


Dick Foran 


Oct. 2/43 


62m 










Escape to Danger (British) 


RKO 


419 


Eric Portman-Ann Dvorak 


Block 4 


83m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 






Eve of St. Mark, The 


20th-Fox 


429 


Michael O'Shea-Anne Baxter 


June, '44 


96m 


May 20/44 


1897 


1636 


1947 


Ever Since Venus 


Col. 




Alan Mowbray-Ann Savage 


Not Set 








1971 




FALCON and the Coeds, 


The RKO 


410 


Tom Conway-Jean Brooks 


Block 2 


68m 


Nov. 6/43 


1615 


1599 




Falcon in Mexico, The 


RKO 




Tom Conway-Mona Maris 


Not Set 








1971 




Falcon Out West, The 


RKO 


421 


Tom Conway-Barbara Hale 


Block 5 


64 m 


Mar. 4/44 


1782 






Fallen Sparrow, The 


RKO 


401 


Maureen O'Hara-John Garfield 


Block 1 


93m 


Aug. 21/43 


1547 


1 182 


1719 


False Colors 


UA 




William Boyd 


Nov. 5/43 


65m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1431 




Fanny by Gaslight (Brit.) G 


ains.-GFD 




Phyllis Calvert-James Mason 


Not Set 


108m 


May 27/44 


1910 






Farewell, My Lovely 


RKO" 




Dick Powell-Anne Shirley 


Not Set 








1971 




Fighting Seabees, The 


Rep. 


311 


John Wayne-Susan Hayward 


Mar. 10/44 


100m 


Jan. 22/44 


1725 


1616 


1847 


Find the Blackmailer 


WB 


306 


Faye Emerson-Jerome Cowan 


Nov. 6/43 


55m 


Oct. 23/43 


1594 






Fired Wife 


Univ. 


8017 


Robert Paige-Louise Allbritton 


Sept. 3/43 


73m 


Sept. 4/43 


1521 






Flesh and Fantasy 


Univ. 


8062 . 


Charles Boyer-Barbara Stanwyck 


Oct. 29/43 


94m 


Sept. 18/43 


1541 


1058 


1 766 


Follow the Boys 


Univ. 


8061 


Stage and Screen Entertainers 


Not Set 


1 1 9m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1635 


1947 


Follow the Leader 


Mono. 




East Side Kids 


June 3/44 


65m 


July 1/44 


1970 


1606 




Forty-eight Hours (British) 


AFE 




Leslie Banks-Basil Sydney 


June 28/44 


90m 


Nov. 14/42 


1981 






(formerly Went the Day Well?) 










June 24/44 








Forty Thieves 


UA 




William Boyd-Andy Clyde 


June 23/44 


60m 


1958 






For Whom the Bell Tolls (color) Para. 


4338 


Gary Cooper-lngrid Bergman 


Special 


168m 


July 17/43 


1546 


855 


1719 


Four Jills in a Jeep 20th-Fox 


All 


Kay Francis-Carole Landis 


Mar.,'44 


89m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 


1 676 


1947 


Frenchman's Creek (color} 


Para. 




Joan Fontaine-Arturo de Cordova 


1944-45 








1416 




Frisco Kid (Reissue) 


Wb 


325 


James Cagney-Margaret Lindsay 


Mar. 4/44 


77m 


Nov. 2/35 


1726 






Frontier Law 


Univ. 


8082 


Russell Hayden-Jennifer Holt 


Nov. 5/43 


55m 






1606 




Frontier Outlaws 


PRC 


462 


Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 


Mar. 4/44 


58m 






1746 





MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



1987 



rah 

Fugitive from Sonera 
Fuzzy Settles Down 



Company 

Rep. 
PRC 



Prod. 
Number 

361 

. 465 



Stan 

Don Barry-Lynn Merrick 
Buster Crabbe-Al St. John 



Release 
Date 

July l.*43 

July 25,'44 



Running 
Time 

55m 



r~ REVIEWED -N 

M. P. Product 
Herald Digest 
Issue Page 

July 10/43 1414 



Advance Service 
Synopsis Data 
Page Page 

1375 
1937 



GAMBLER'S Choice Para. 

Gang's All Here, The (color) 20th-Fox 

Gangway for Tomorrow RKO 

Gaslight MGM 

Ghost Catchers, The Univ. 

Ghost Ship. The RKO 
Ghost That Walks Alone, The Col. 

Gildersleeve on Broadway RKO 

Gildersleeve's Ghost RKO 

Girl Crazy MGM 

Girl from Monterrey, The PRC 

Girl irs the Case, The Col. 

Girls on Probation (Reissue) WB 

Girl Who Dared, The Rep. 

Going My Way Para. 

Gold Town MGM 

Good Fellows, The Para. 

Good-night, Sweetheart Rep. 

Government Girl RKO 

Goyescas (Spanish) RKO 

Great Moment, The Para. 
Great Mr. Handel, The (color) 

(British) Midfilrt 

Greenwich Village (color) 20th-Fox 

Guadalcanal Diary 20th-Fox 

Guest in the House UA 

Gung Ho Univ. 

Gunsmoke Mesa PRC 

Guns of the Law PRC 

Guns of the Pecos (Reissue) WB 

Guy Named Joe, A MGM 
Gypsy Wildcat (color), 1944-45 Univ. 



4324 Chester Morris-Nancy Kelly 

416 Alice Faye-Carmen Miranda 

407 Margo-Robert Ryan-John Carradine 

425 Charles Boyer-lngrid Bergman 
.... Olsen and Johnson 

412 Richard Dix-Edith Barrett 

5042 Arthur Lake-Lynn Roberts 

409 Harold Peary-Billie Burke 

426 Harold Peary-Marion Martin 
409 Mickey Rooney-Judy Garland 
412 Armida-Edgar Kennedy 

5028 Edmund Lowe-Janis Carter 

328 Jane Bryan-Ronald Reagan 

322 Lorna Gray-Peter Cookson 

4335 Bing Crosby-Rise Stevens 

.... Wallace Beery-Binnie Barnes 

4302 Cecil Kellaway-Helen Walker 

320 Bob Livingston-Ruth Terry 

408 Olivia de Havilland-Sonny Tufts 
461 Musical Feature 

4330 Joel McCrea-Betty Field 

.... Wilfred Lawson-Elizabeth Allan 

.... Don Ameche-Carmen Miranda 

412 Preston Foster-William Bendix 

.... Anne Baxter-Ralph Bellamy 

8064 Randolph Scott-Grace McDonald 

453 Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 

455 Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 

335 Dick Foran 

416 Spencer Tracy-Irene Dunne 

.... Marie Montez-Jon Hall 



Block 5 


66m 


Apr. 29/44 


1867 


1850 




Dec. 24.'43 


103m 


Dec. 4/43 


1653 


1530 


1847 


Block 2 


69m 


Nov, 6/43 


1614 


1566 




May, '44 


1 14m 


May 16/44 


1885 


1786 


1947 


June 16/44 


68m 


June 10/44 


1935 


1835 




Block 3 


69m 


Dec. 1 1 ,'43 


1666 


1646 


.... 


Feb. 10/44 


63 m 


Feb. 19/44 


1762 


1696 




Block 2 


65 m 


Oct. 23/43 


1595 


1566 




Block 6 


64 m 


June 24/44 


1957 


1786 




Nov.,'43 


99m 


Aug. 7/43 


1558 


1 191 


1766 


UCT. t-, *r3 


o i m 


C._i or i^jo 

oepT. /a, **s 


1 CCA 


1509 




Apr. 20/44 


64m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1806 




Dec. 4/43 


63 m 


Oct. 29/38 


1626 






Aug. 5/44 








1899 




Special 


126 m 


Feb. 26/44 


1773 


1763 




Not Set 








1849 




Block 1 


70m 


Aug. 14/43 


1559 


1 191 




June 17/44 


67m 


June 10/44 


1935 


1850 




Block 2 


93 m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1416 


1766 


Special 


1 10m 


May 20/44 


1898 






Block 6 


83m 


June 10/44 


1934 


912 




Sept. 9/43 


89m 


Sept. 18/43 


1542 






1944-45 








1676 




Nov. 5/43 


93m 


Oct. 30/43 


1605 


1457 


i766 


Not Set 








1983 




Dec. 3 1/43 


88m 


Dec. 25/43 


1686 


1599 


1847 


Jan. 3/44 


59m 


June 17/44 


1946 


1635 




Apr. 10/44 


55m 






1806 




Oct. 2/43 


56m 










Mar/44 


120m 


Dec. 25/43 


1686 


1431 


1902 


Sept. 1/44 








1675 





HAIL the Conquering Hero 


Para. 


4326 


Eddie Bracken-Ella Raines 


• Block 6 


101m 


June 10/44 


1933 


1696 




Hail to the Rangers 


Col. 


5201 


Charles Starrett 


Sept. 16/43 


57m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 


1055 




Hairy Ape, The 


UA 




William Bendix-Susan Hayward 


June 16/44 


91m 


May 20/44 
Mar. 4/44 


1897 


1763 




Halfway House, The (British) 


Ealing 




Francoise Rosay-Mervyn Johns 


Not Set 


95m 


1781 






Hands Across the Border 


Rep. 


341 


Roy Rogers-Ruth Terry 


Jan. 5/44 


73m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


i545 




Happy Land 


20th-Fox 


415 


Don Ameche-Frances Dee 


Dec. 3/43 


75m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


1555 


i766 


Harvest Melody 


PRC 


402 


Rosemary Lane-Johnny Downs 


Nov. 22/43 


71m 


Oct. 9/43 


1574 


1545 




Het-Check Honey 


Univ. 


B03I 


Grace McDonald-Leon Errol 


Mar. 10/44 


69m 


Mar. 1/44 


1794 


1746 




Having a Wonderful Crime 
Heat's On, The 


RKO 




Pat O'Brien-George Murphy 


Not Set 








1971 




Col. 


5009 


Mae West-Victor Moore 


Dec. 2/43 


79 m 


Dec. 4/43 


1653 


1555 


1818 


Heaven Can Wait (color) 


20th-Fox 


402 


Don Ameche-Gene Tierney 


Aug. 13/43 


1 12m 


July 24/43 


1578 


1240 


1617 


Heaven Is Around the Corner 


















(British) Nat'l-Anglo 




Will Fyffe-Leni Lynn 


Not Set 


100m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 






Heavenly Body, The 


MGM 


421 


William Powell-Hedy Lamarr 


Apr.,'44 


94m 


Jan. 1/44 


1693 


1555 


1947 


Heavenly Days 


RKO 1 




Fibber McGee and Molly 


Not Set 








1817 




Henry Aldrich, Boy Scosit 


Para. 


431 1 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 3 


65 m 


Jan. 8/44 


1706 


1696 


1902 


Henry Aldrich Haunts a Houi 


e Para. 


4306 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 2 


73m 


Nov. 6/43 


1614 


1566 


1766 


Henry Aldrich's Little Secret 


Para. 


4328 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 6 


75m 


June 10/44 


1933 


1747 




Henry Aldrich Plays Cupid 


Para. 


4322 


Jimmy Lydon-Charlie Smith 


Block 5 


65m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1431 




Here Comes Elmer 


Rep. 


303 


Al Pearce-Dale Evans 


Nov. 15/43 


74m 


Oct. 16/43 


1585 






Her Primitive Man 


Univ. 


8016 


Louise Allbritton-Robert Paige 


Apr. 2 1/44 


79m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1675 




Hey, Rookie 


Col. 


5013 


Ann Miller-Larry Parks 


Mar. 9/44 


77m 


May 6/44 


1877 


1654 




Hidden Valley Outlaws 


Rep. 


378 


Bill Elliott-Gabby Hayes 


Apr. 2/44 


55m 


Apr. 8/44 


1834 


1806 




Hi Diddle Diddle 


UA 




Martha Scott-Adolphe Menjou 


Aug. 20/43 


73m 


July 31/43 


1559 


1375 


1617 


Hi Good-Lookin' 


Univ. 


8044 


Eddie Quillan-Harriet Hilliard 


Mar. 24/44 


62m 


Mar. 18/44 


1801 


1763 




Higher and Higher 


RKO 


415 


Michele Morgan-Frank Sinatra 


Block 3 


90m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


1616 


1847 


His Butler's Sister 


Univ. 


8004 


Deanna Durbin-Franchot Tone 


Nov. 26/43 


93 m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


1555 


1766 


Hitler Gang, The 


Para. 


4323 


Robert Watson-Victor Varconi 


Block 5 


100m 


Apr. 29/44 


1865 


1675 




Hi Ya Sailor 


Univ. 


8035 


Donald Woods-Elyse Knox 


Oct. 15/43 


63 m 


Oct. 9/43 


1574 


1531 




Holy Matrimony 


20th-Fox 


403 


Monty Woolley-Gracie Fields 


Aug 27/43 


87m 


Aug. 28/43 


1547 


1431 


1655 


Home in Indiana (color) 


20th-Fox 


433 


Walter Brennan-Lon McAllister 


July/44 
Sept. 13/43 


103m 


May 27/44 


1909 


1634 




Hoosier Holiday 


Rep. 


302 


Dale Evans-George Byron 


72m 


Aug. 28/43 


1547 






Horn Blows at Midnight, The 


WB 




Jack Benny-Alexis Smith 


1944-45 






1715 




Hostages 


Para. 


4305 


Luise Rainer-William Bendix 


Block 1 


87 m 


Aug. 14/43 


1579 


1277 


1766 


Hotel Reserve (British) 


RKO 




James Mason-Lucie Mannheim 


Not Set 


89m 


June 17/44 


1945 






Hot Rhythm 


Mono. 




Dona Drake-Robert Lowery 


Apr. 22/44 


79m 


Mar. 4/44 


1783 


1763 




Hour Before the Dawn, The 


Para. 


4317 


Veronica Lake-Franchot Tone 


Block 4 


74m 


Mar. 4/44 


1781 


1555 





I DOOD it 

I Love a Soldier 
Impatient Years, The 
Impostor, The 
Incendiary Blonde (color) 
In Old Chicago (Reissue) 
In Old Oklahoma 
In Our Time 

In the Meantime, Darling 

Invisible Man's Revenge, The 

Irish Eyes Are Smiling (color) 

Iron Major, The 

Is Everybody Happy? 

Isle of Forgotten Sins 

It Happened Tomorrow 



MGM 


403 


Red Skelton-Eleanor Powell 


Sept.,'43 


102m 


July 31/43 


1579 


1 191 


1719 


Para. 


4329 


Paulette Goddard-Sonny Tufts 


Block 6 


106m 


June 10/44 


1934 


1675 




Col. 




Jean Arthur-Lee Bowman-Charles Coburn Not Set 








1849 




Univ. 


8066 


Jean Gabin-Allyn Joslyn 


Feb. 1 1/44 


94 m 


Feb. 12/44 


1754 


1616 


1847 


Para. 




Betty Hutton-Arturo de Cordova 


1944-45 








1675 




20th-Fox 


406 


Alice Faye-Tyrone Power-Don Ameche 


Oct. 29/43 


94 m 


Jan. 8/38 


1542 






Rep. 


307 


John Wayne-Martha Scott 


Dec. 6/43 


102m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 




1719 


WB 


311 


Ida Lupino-Paul Henreid 


Feb. 19/44 


1 10m 


Feb. 5/44 


1741 


1416 


1902 


20th-Fox 




Jeanne Crain-Frank Latimore 


1944-45 








1850 


Univ. 




Jon Hall-Evelyn Ankers 


June 9/44 


78 m 


June 3/44 


i 92 J 


1849 




20th-Fox 




Monty Woolley-Dick Haymes 


1944-45 








1835 




RKO 


406 


Pat O'Brien-Ruth Warrick 


Block 2 


85m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 


1555 


1719 


Col. 


5016 


Ted Lewis-Nan Wynn 


Oct. 28/43 


78 m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 


1545 


1655 


PRC 


401 


John Carradine-Gale Sondergaard 


Aug. 15/43 


84m 


July 3/43 


1532 


1339 


I'6I7 


UA 




Dick Powell-Linda Darnell 


Apr. 7/44 


84m 


Mar. 25/44 


1813 


1675 


1947 



1988 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 8, 1944 



REVIEWED 



Title 

JACK London 
Jamboree 
Jam Session 
Jane Eyre 
Janie 

Jeannie (British) 
Jrve Junction 
Johnny Come Lately 

Johnny Doesn't Live Here 
Jungle Woman 

KANSAN, The 

Kansas City Kitty 
Keys of the Kingdom 
Kings of the Ring 
Kismet (color) 
Klondike Kate 
Knickerbocker Holiday 



Prod. 

Company Number 
UA 

Rep. 316 
Col. 5015 
20th-Fox 420 
WB 

English .... 
PRC 407 
UA 

Mono. .... 
Univ 



UA 
Col. 
20th-Fox 
Lewis-Lesser 
MGM 
Col. 5029 
UA 



Stars 

Michael O'Shea-Susan Hayward 
George Byron-Ruth Terry 
Ann Miller-Jess Barker 
Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine 
Joyce Reynolds-Robert Hutton 
Barbara Mullen-Michael Redgrave 
Dickie Moore-Tina Thayer 
James Cagney-Grace George 
Simone Simon-James Ellison 
Evelyn Ankers-J. Carrol Naish 

Richard Dix-Jane Wyatt 
Joan Davis-Jane Frazee 
Sir Cedric Hardwicke-Roddy McDowall 
Fight Film Feature 
Ronald Colman-Marlene Dietrich 
Ann Savage-Tom Neal 
Nelson Eddy-Charles Coburn 







M. r. 


Product 


Advance 


Service 


Release 


Running 


rieraiu 


Digest 


Synopsis 


uaia 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Page 


Dec. 24/43 


93m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1554 


1847 


May 5,'44 


71m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1817 




Apr. 13/44 


77m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1806 


1947 


Feb.,'44 


96m 


Feb. 5/44 


1741 


1240 


1847 


1944-45 








1747 




Oct. I,'43 


85m 


Aug. 23/43 


1593 






Dec. 20,'43 


64m 


Nov. 20/43 


1633 


1606 




Sept. 3,"43 


97m 


Aug. 28/43 


1559 


1375 


1719 


July 8, '44 


79m 


May 13, '44 


1886 


1826 




July 7.'44 


60m 


May 27/44 


1910 


1899 




Sept. I0,'43 


79m 


June 19/43 


1547 


1 182 





Not Set 
1944-45 
Jan. 22/44 
Not Set 
Dec. 16/43 
Mar. 17/44 



95m 

64m 
85m 



Jan. 29/44 

Feb. 5/44 
Mar. 4/44 



1735 

1742 
1781 



1923 
1806 

1635 
1636 
1635 



818 



LAD from Our Town 


Artkino 




Russian Feature 


Oct. 6/43 


65m 


Oct. 16/43 


1586 






Ladies Courageous 


Univ. 


8065 


Loretta Young-Geraldine Fitzgerald 


Mar. 17/44 


88m 


Mar. 25/44 


1814 


1616 


1847 


Ladies of Washington 


20th-Fox 


430 


Ronald Graham-Trudy Marshall 


June/44 


61m 


May 20/44 
Mar. 18/44 


1898 


1849 




Lady and the Monster, The 


Rep. 


315 


Vera Ralston-Richard Arlen 


Apr. 17/44 


86m 


1801 




1947 


Lady in the Dark (color) 


Para. 


4336 


Ginger Rogers-Ray Milland 


Special 
Mar. 15/44 


100m 


Feb. 12/44 


1753 


i 09 i 


1947 


Lady in the Death House 


PRC 


414 


Lionel Atwill-Jean Parker 


58m 


Mar. 25/44 


1814 


1746 




Lady, Let's Dance 


Mono. 




Belita-James Ellison 


Apr. 15/44 


88m 


Jan. 29/44 


1735 


1599 




Lady Takes a Chance, A 


RKO 


405 


Jean Arthur-John Wayne 


Block 1 


86m 


Aug. 2 1/43 


1547 


1240 


1655 


Land Beyond the Law (Reissue) WB 


336 


Dick Foran 


Oct. 2/43 


55m 








Land of the Outlaws 


Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


Not Set 








1983 




Laramie Trail, The 
Larceny with Music 


Rep. 


355 


Bob Livingston-Smiley Burnette 


Apr. 3/44 


55m 


Mar. 25/44 


1814 


1786 




Univ. 


8028 


Allan Jones-Kitty Carlisle 


Sept. 10/43 


64m 


Sept. 1 1/43 


1530 


1351 




Lassie Come Home (color) 


MGM 


410 


Roddy McDowall-Edmund Gwenn 


Dec.,'43 


90m 


Aug. 21/43 


1546 


1240 


1766 


Last Horseman, The 


Col. 


5208 


Russell Hayden-Dub Taylor 


June 22/44 


56m 


July 1/44 


1969 


1890 




Last Ride, The 


WB 




Richard Travis-Eleanor Parker 


1944-45 






1 1 15 




Laura 


20th-Fox 




Gene Tierney-Dana Andrews 


1944-45 








1899 




Law Men 


Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


May 6/44 


55m 


July 1/44 


1970 


1817 




'Law of the Saddle 


PRC 




Bob Livingston-AI St. John 


Aug. 28/43 


59m 


July 8/44 


1981 






Leave It to the Irish 


Mono. 




James Dunn-Wanda McKay 


Aug. 5/44 








1923 




Let's Face It 


Para. 


430i 


Bob Hope-Betty Hutton 


Block 1 


76 m 


Aug. 7/43 


1559 


1277 


1766 


Lifeboat 


20th-Fox 


419 


Tallulah Bankhead-William Bendix 


Jan. 28/44 


96m 


Jan. 15/44 


1713 


1616 


1902 


Life and Death of Colonel 


Blimp 


















(British) Archers-Gen'l 




Anton Walbrook-Roger Livesey 


Not Set 


163m 


July 10/43 


1413 






Lodger, the 


20th-Fox 


417 


Laird Cregar-Merle Oberon 


Jan. 7/44 


84m 


Jan. 8/44 


1705 


1636 


1902 


Lost Angel 


MGM 


415 


Margaret O'Brien-James Craig 


Jan.,'44 


91m 


Nov. 6/43 


1613 


1555 


1902 


Lost m a Harem 


MGM 




Bud Abbott-Lou Costello 


Not Set 








1850 




Louisiana Hayride 


Col. 




Judy Canova-Richard Lane 


July 13/44 








1890 




Lumber Jack 


UA 




William Boyd-Andy Clyde 


Apr. 28/44 


63 m 


Apr. 8/44 


1834 


1763 





MACHINE Gun Mama 

(formerly Mexican Fiesta) 
Madame Curie 
Mad Ghoul, The 
Maisie Goes to Reno 
Make Your Own Bed 
Man from Down Under, The 
Man from 'Frisco 
Man from the Rio Grande, The 
Man in Half Moon Street, The 
Manpower (Reissue) 
Marine Raiders 
Marked Trails 

Marriage Is a Private Affair 

Marshal of Gunsmoke 

Marshal of Reno 

Mask of Dimitrios, The 

Master Race, The 

Meet Me in St. Louis (color) 

Meet the People 

Melody Parade 

Melody Trail (Reissue) 

Memphis Belle, The (color) Para 

Men of the Sea (British) 

Men on Her Mind 

Merry Monahans. The, 1944-45 

Million Dollar Kid, The 

Minesweeper 

Ministry of Fear 

Minstrel Man 

Miracle of Morgan's Creek, The 

Mojave Firebrand 

Monster Maker, The 

Moonlight and Cactus, 1944-45 

Moonlight in Vermont 

Moon Over Las Vegas 

Mr. Muggs Steps Out 

Mr. Skeffington 

Mr. Winkle Goes to War 

Mrs. Parkington 

Mummy's Ghost, The 

Murder, He Says 

Murd er in the Blue Room 



PRC 421 Armida-EI Brendel Aug. 2/44 

MGM 490 Greer Garson-Walter Pidgeon Feb.,'44 

Univ. 8038 Evelyn Ankers-David Bruce Nov. 12/43 

MGM .... Ann Sothern-John Hodiak Not Set 

WB 317 Jack Carson-Jane Wyman June 10/44 

MGM 411 Charles Laughton-Binnie Barnes Dec.,'43 

Rep. 318 Michael O'Shea-Anne Shirley July 1/44 

Rep. 363 Don Barry-Twinkle Watts Oct. 18/43 

Para Nils Asther-Helen Walker 1944-45 

WB 341 Edward G. Robinson-George Raft July 15/44 

RKO 427 Pat O'Brien-Ruth Hussey " Block 6 

Mono. .... Hoot Gibson-Veda Ann Borg July 29/44 

MGM .... Lana Turner-John Hodiak Not Set 

Univ. 8083 Tex Ritter-Russell Hayden Jan. 21/44 

Rep. 3312 Bill Elliott-Bobby Blake July 2/44 

WB 318 Sydney Greenstreet-Peter Lorre July 1/44 

RKO .... Carl Esmond-Osa Massen Not Set 

MGM .... Judy Garland-Margaret O'Brien Not Set 

MGM 426 Dick Powell-Lucille Ball May,'44 

Mono. .... Mary Beth Hughes-Eddie Quillan Aug. 27/43 

Rep. 3304 Gene Autry June 1/44 

-WAC T3-I War Documentary Apr. 14/44 

PRC 420 Wilfred Lawson-Mary Jerrold Apr. 30/44 

PRC 409 Mary Beth Hughes-Edward Norris Feb. 12/44 

Univ. .... Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan Sept. 15/44 

Mono. . . East Side Kids Feb. 28/44 

Para. 4308 Richard Arlen-Jean Parker Block 2 

Para. .... Ray Milland-Mariorie Reynolds 1944-45 

PRC 40.4 Benny Fields-Gladys George July 1/44 

Para. 4312 Eddie Bracken-Betty Hutton Block 3 

Rep. 377 Bill Elliott-Gabby Hayus Mar. 19/44 

PRC 419 J. Carrol Naish-Ralph Morgan Apr. 15/44 

Univ. .... Andrews Sisters-Leo Carillo Sept. 9/44 

Univ. 8025 Gloria Jean-Fay Helm Dec. 24/43 

Univ. 8037 Anne Gwynne-David Bruce Apr. 28/44 

Mono East Side Kids Dec. 10/43 

WB 319 Bette Davis-Claude Rains Aug. 12/44 

Col. .... E. G. Robinson-Robert Armstrong Aug. 3/44 

MGM .... Greer Garson-Walter Pidgeon Not Set 

Univ. .... John Carradine-Lon Chaney July 7/44 

Para. .... Fred MacMurray-Marjorie Main 1944-45 

Univ. .... Anne Gwynne-Donald Cook Not Set 



1889 



124m 


Nov. 20/43 


1633 


1416 


1847 


65m 


Oct. 23/43 


1594 


1586 
1971 




82m 


May 20/44 
Aug. 7/43 


1898 


1715 




103m 


1547 






91m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1835 




55m 


Oct. 2/43 


1566 


1747 




103m 


July 5/41 


1957 






90m 


June 24/44 


1957 


1696 





54m 
95m 



1 00m 
73 m 

41m 

50m 
67m 

65m 
66m 

69 m 
98m 
55m 
65 m 

62m 
69m 
63m 
127m 



July 8/44 
June 10/44 



Apr. 8/44 
Aug. 7/43 

Mar. 25/44 

Feb. 5/44 

Feb. 26/44 
Nov. 6/43 

July 1/44 
Jan. 8/44 
Jan. 29/44 
Mar. I 1/44 

Dec. 25/43 
Apr. 15/44 
Dec. 25/43 

May 27/44 



61m May 13/44 



1981 
1934 



1834 
1559 

1813 

1743 

1774 
1615 

1970 
1705 
1734 
1794 

1686 
1845 
1686 

1909 

1886 



1971 
1806 
1676 
1923 
1746 
1983 
1715 
1456 
1339 



1890 
1715 
1786 
1676 
1606 
1616 

1079 



1746 
1635 
1785 
1555 

1654 
1817 
1835 

1763 
1983 
1971 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



1989 



r- REVIEWED —s 















M. P. 


Product 


Advance 


Servile 






Prod. 




Release 


Running 


Herald 


Digest 


Synopsis 


Data 


rule 


Company 


Number 


Stars 


Date 


Time 


Issue 


Page 


Page 


Page 


Murder on the Watertront 


\A/S> 

WB 


302 


John Loder-Ruth Ford 


Sept. I8,'43 


49 m 


July 3 1 , 43 


1 C70 

i o/y 






Music in Manhattan 


RKO 




Anne Shirley-Dennis Day 


Not Set 








1 oco 




My Best Gat 


Rep. 


312 


Jane Withers-Jimmy Lydon 


Mar.28,'44 


67m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 


1696 




My Reputation 


WB 




Barbara Stanwyck-George Brent 


1944-45 








1695 




iviyaitji y ui uouuaJi 


Rep. 


3\rt 


in us Astner-Kutn lerry 


Kl«./ 03 'A1 
INOV. 13, 43 


63m 


Oct 23 "43 

vCTi lJ| ■ J 


1595 


1586 




iviysnsry ivion 


MA 




William Boyd-Andy olyde 


u a „ 0 1 'AA 

May 3 1 , 44 


oom 


lulu 1 '44 

July l 1 ~ 1 


1969 








PRC 


408 


Buster Crabbe-Fifi Dorsey 


Jan. 25.'44 


73m 


U A * A A 

Mar. 4, 44 


1 103 


1634 


iyuz 


National Barn Dance 


Para. 




Jean Heather-James Brown 


1 944-45 








1 QAQ 

IB4V 




National Velvet (color) 


MSM 




Mickey Rooney-Jackie Jenkins 


Not Set 








1 /63 




N avy Way, Ihe 


n _ 

Para. 


At 1 1 

4316 


Robert Lowery-Jean Parker 


Block 4 


74m 


Feb. zo, 44 


1 "71 A 

1 / /4 


1 717 

1 /4/ 


iyoz 


Never a Dull Moment 


Univ. 


8030 


Ritz Bros.-Frances Langford 


Nov. 19, '43 


60m 


Nov. 6, '43 


i tic 
1615 


Dei 
1351 




Night of Adventure, A 


D 1/ r\ 

KK.U 


4Z8 


Tom Conway-Jean Brooks 


Block 6 


65m 


June i, 44 


1 0*7 1 


1 obU 




Nine toirls 


Col. 


5018 


Ann Harding-Evelyn Keyes 


Feb. I7,'44 


78m 


Mar. 18/44 


1 802 


1 171 

16/6 


1 902 


No Greater Love (Russian) 


Artkino 




Russian feature 


Mar. 3, "44 


71m 


U A 1 A A 

Mar. 4, 44 


1 782 




1902 


None But the Lonely Heart 


RKO 




Cary Grant-Ethel Barrymore 


Not Set 








1 alb 




None Shall Escape 


Col. 


bUUo 


K A L 1 ■ ■ • | 1 is 

Marsha Hunt-Alexander Knox 


Feb. 3, '44 


or 

bom 


1,. 1 C % AA 

Jan. i D, 44 


1 7 1 3 
1/13 


1 AOC 


1 04 / 


Northern Pursuit 


WB 


307 


Errol Flynn-Julie Bishop 


Nov. 13/43 


94m 


Oct. 23/43 


1593 


1471 


1847 


North Star, The RKO-Goldwyn 


451 


Walter Huston-Anne Baxter 


Special 


105m 


Oct. 16/43 


1585 


1305 


1766 


Norway Replies 


Hoffberg 




Documentary on Norway 


Feb. 25,'44 


61m 


Mar. 4/44 


1782 






No Time for Love 


Para. 


4309 


Claudette Colbert-Fred MacMurray 


Block 2 


83m 


Nov. 13/43 


1625 


855 


1818 


OBJECTIVE, Burma 


WB 




C 1 PI 1 | LI II 

trrol rlynn-nenry null 


1944-45 


■ • • • 






1 OQO 
1 703 




Oh, Susanna (Reissue) 


Rep. 


3303 


Gene Autry 


Apr. 15, '44 


59m 










Oh, What a Night 


Mono. 




Edmund Lowe-Marjorie Rambeau 


Aug. 12, '44 






■ ■■ 


1923 




Oklahoma Kid (Reissue) 


WB 


330 


James Cagney-Humphrey Bogart 


Sept. 1 1 ,'43 


80m 


Mar. 1 8, 39 


1482 






Oklahoma Raiders 


Univ. 


8084 


Tex Ritter-Fuzzy Knight 


Mar. 17/44 








1 785 




Old Acquaintance 


WB 


308 


Bette Devis-Miriam Hopkins 


Nov. 27/43 


1 1 0m 


ki (ii) 
Nov. 6, 43 


1 L 1 1 

1613 


1 1 oo 
1 1 YZ 


1 902 


O My Darling Clementine 


Rep. 


308 


Frank Albertson-Lorna Grey 


Dec. 3 1 ,'43 


68m 


P\ A * AO 

Dec. 4, 43 


1 653 


1636 




On Approval (British) 


Box-Brook. 




| . k in ■ • i *M* 

Olive Brook-Beatrice Lillie 


Not Set 


80m 


May //, 44 


1910 






Once Upon a Time 


Col. 


5004 


Cary Grant-Janet Blair 


May 1 1/44 


89m 


A — *}0 ' A A 

Apr. 2V, 44 


1 867 


1616 


1902 


One Body Too Many 


Para. 




Jack Haley-Jean Parker 


1 944-45 






• • • • 


1850 




One Inch from Victory 


Scoop 




Documentary on Russia 


Apr. 25/44 


67m 


ii'.. , iti 
May 6, 44 


1878 






Our Hearts Were Young and Gay Para. 




Diana Lynn-Gail Russell 


1 944-45 








| 711 

1 746 




Outlaw Roundup 


PRC 


454 


Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 


Feb. 10/44 


55m 






1715 




Outlaw Trail, The 


Mono. 




Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele 


Apr. 29/44 


55m 


Apr. 1/44 


1826 


1786 




Outlaws of Sante Fe 


Rep. 


366 


Don Barry-V/ally Vernon 


A A % AA 

A\pr. 4, 44 


54m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 






Overland Mail Robbery 


Rep. 


376 


Rill £11,^44 Anno lnffr-AWC 

dm: ciiioTT-Mnne jerrreys 


kj flrt '43 
INOV. ZU, 40 




Oct. 23/43 


1594 






PARDON My Rhythm 


Univ. 


8032 


Gloria Jean-Patric Knowles 


May 19/44 


61 m 


May 6, 44 


1 878 


1 785 




Paris After Dark 


20th-Fox 


409 


George Sanders-Brenda Marshall 


Oct. 15/43 


85m 


Oct. 9/43 


1573 


1545 




Partners of the Trail 


Mono. 




ii kiln n liiii 

Johnny Mack Brown-Raymond Hatton 


Apr. 1/44 


54m 


k i A 'A A 

Mar. 4, 44 


1 TOO 


1717 

1 747 




Passage to Marseille 


WB 


312 


Humphrey Bogart-Michele Morgan 


Mar. 1 1/44 


I Aft 

1 UVm 


C„L | O * A A 

reb. 1 7, 44 


1 Ti 1 

1 lb 1 


1616 


1 947 


Passport to Destiny 


RKO 


417 


Elsa Lanchester-Gordon Oliver 


Block 4 


64m 


Jan. 29/44 


1 734 


1636 




(formerly Passport to Adventure) 


















Patrick the Great 


Univ. 




Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan 


Not Set 








1675 




Pearl of Death, 1944-45 


Univ. 




n • 1 r\ i I I Li' In 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce 


Sept. 22/44 








1 983 




People's Avengers (Russian 


Artkino 




War Documentary 


June 15/44 


56m 


June 24, 44 


1958 




.... 


Phantom Lady 


Univ. 


8014 


Ella Raines-Franchot Tone 


Jan. 28/44 


87m 


1 — lO 1 A A 

Jan. ii, 44 


1 733 


1675 


1902 


Picture of Dorian Gray, The MGM 




George Sanders-Angela Lansbury 


Not Set 




" ■ 




1899 




Pinto Bandit 


PRC 


456 


Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill 


Apr. 27/44 


s6m 


June 1 7, 44 


1946 


1826 




Pin Up Girl (color) 


20th-Fox 


427 


Betty Grable-Joe E. Brown 


May/44 


oJm 


Apr. 22/44 


1857 


153 1 


1947 


Pistol Packin' Mama 


Rep. 


310 


Ruth Terry-Bob Livingston 


Dec. 15/43 


/ A 

64m 


Dec. 1 1/43 


1666 


1654 


1818 


Polo Joe (Reissue) 


WB 


346 


Joe E. Brown 


July 15/44 


65m 


Sept. 26/36 


1957 






Port of 40 Thieves 


Rep. 


324 


Stephanie Bachelor-Richard Powers 


Aug. 13/44 


CO 

oom 


June 24/44 


1958 






Practically Yours 


Para. 




Claudette Colbert-Fred MacMurray 


1 944-45 








1806 




Prairie Thunder (Reissue) 


WB 


332 


Dick Foran 


Oct. 2/43 


□Dm 










Pride of the Plains 


Rep. 


353 


Robert Livingston-Smiley Burnette 


Jan. 5/44 


56m 


Dec. 4, 43 


1653 






Princess and the Pirate, The 


















(color) RKO-Goldwyn 




Bob Hope-Virginia Mayo 


Not Set 








1889 




Princess O'Rourke 


WB 


3Q5 


Olivia de Havilland-Robert Cummings 


Oct. 23/43 


94m 


Sept. 25/43 


1553 


962 


1655 


Purple Heart, The 


20th-Fox 


422 


Dana Andrews-Richard Conte 


Mar.,'44 


99m 


Feb. 26/44 


1773 


1654 


1947 


QUEEN and the Cardina 


French 




Georges Milton-Robert Le Vigan 


May 3 1/44 


7 1 m 


1 _ _ i ft >AA 

June 1 U, 44 


1935 






RACKET Man, The 


Col. 


5036 


Tom Neal-Jeanne Bates 


Jan. 1 8, 44 


LA — 

o*i m 


Jan. 8/44 


1 /U6 


1 1.7/. 

1676 




Raiders of the Border 


Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


Jan. 31/44 




Jan. 1 d, 44 


nil 
1/14 






Raiders of Sunset Pass 


Rep. 


352 


Eddie Dew-5miley Burnette 


Dec. 20/43 


oom 


Uec. zd, 4i 


1 LOL 
1 OOO 


1457 




Rainbow Island (color) 


Para. 




Dorothy Lamour-tddie Bracken 


1 944-45 




bept. y, jy 


■"• 


I LE A 

1 654 




Rains Came, The ("Reissue) 


20th-Fox 


410 


Myrna Loy-Tyrone Power 


Nov. 26/43 


0 c 
Vom 


1 574 






Range Law 


Mono. 




Johnny Mack Brown 


II 1 ' A A 

July 1 , 44 


O / m 


U _ w 1 ^ *AA 

May 14, 44 


1 OOi 


■ ■ ■ 




Rationing 


MGM 


418 


. i . ii n k i • * ki' 

Wallace Beery-Marione Main 


k i • A A 

Mar., 44 


Yorn 


1 ^ _ "jo y AA 

Jan. zy, 44 


1 734 


1616 


1902 


Reckless Age, 1944-45 


Univ. 




Gloria Jean-Judy Clark 


Nov. 1 7/44 








1983 




Resurrection (Mexican) 


Clasa 




Lupita Tovar-Emilio Tuero 


Apr. 10/44 


oom 


A Oft X AA 

Apr. /y, 44 


1 867 






Return of the Ape Man 


Mono. 




Bela Lugosi-John Carradine 


June 24/44 


oum 


1. .1.. O 1 A A 

July o, 44 


1 98 1 


1606 




Return of the Rangers 


PRC 


451 


Dave O Brein-Jim Newill 


Oct. 26/43 


60m 


Oct. 16, '43 


1 585 


1545 




Return of the Vampire 


Col. 


5024 


nil • c • J I . . x 

Bela Lugosi-rneda Inescourt 


kl II '.40 

Nov. 1 !, 43 


AOm 

0 7 m 


C-L, C *AA 

reo. t>, 44 


1 /4z 


1 599 




Rhapsody in Blue 


WB 




1 1 l»BL i All 

Joan Leslie-Robert Alda 


1 944-45 








1530 




Riders of the Deadline 


UA 




William Boyd 


Dec. 3/43 


70m 


Jan. 15/44 


1714 


1696 


■ 


Riding High (coior) 


Para. 


4307 


Dorothy Lamour-Dick Powell 


Dl L O 

Block 2 


oom 


M_., L VJ 

INOV. O, 4i 


1613 


1431 


1847 


Riding West 


Col. 


5207 


/■M f fi ii CL" 1 D 11 

Charles Starrett-Shirley Patterson 


k i t Q * A A 

May 18, 44 








1835 




Road to Utopia 


Para. 




Bing Crosby-Bob nope-D. Lamour 


1944-45 


(r 

oom 


May 17, 44 




1715 




Roger Touhy, Gangster 


20th-Fox 


431 


Preston Foster-Lois Andrews 


II > A A 

July, 44 


1910 


1362 




Rookies in Burma 


RKO 


414 


1 1 /** \A/ 11 D 

Alan Carney-Wally Brown 


OIL "5 

Block 3 


ozm 


uec. 1 1 , 4j 


1 666 


1646 




Rootin', Tootin' Rhythm (Re 


issue) Rep. 


3301 


Gene Autry 


Jan. 15/44 


61m 


Mar. 25/44 








Rosie the Riveter 


Rsd. 


313 


Jane Frazee-Frank Albertson 


Apr. 9/44 


75m 


1814 


1785 




Roughly Speaking 


WB 




Rosalind Russell-Jack Carson 


1 944.45 








1 70 J 




Rustler's Hideout 


PRC 


466 


Buster Crabbe-Al St. John 


Sept. 2/44 








1971 




SAHARA 


Col. 


5003 


Humphrey Bogart-Bruce Bennett 


Oct. 14/43 


97m 


Oct. 2/43 


1565 


1305 


1719 


Saint Meets the Tiger, The 


Rep. 


301 


Hugh Sinclair-Jean Gillis 


July 29/43 


70m 


Aug. 7/43 


1471 







1990 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 8, 194* 



Title 



Prod. 

Company Number 



Saint That Forged a Country, The 

(Mex.) Clasa-Mohme 

Sailor's Holiday Col. 

Salute to the Marines (color) MSM 

San Fernando Valley Rep. 
San Diego, I Love You, 1944-45 Univ. 

San Francisco de Asis (Mex.) Azteca 

Saratoga Trunk WB 

Scarlet Claw, The Univ. 

Secret Command Col. 

Secrets in the Dark MGM 

Secrets of Scotland Yard Rep. 

See Here, Private Hargrove MGM 

See My Lawyer, 1944-45 Univ. 
Sensations of 1945 UA-Stone 

Seven Days Ashore RKO 

Seven Doors to Death PRC 

Seventh Cross, The MGM 

Seventh Victim, The RKO 

Shadows in the Night Col. 

(formerly Crime Doctor's Rendezvous) 

Shake Hands with Murder PRC 

Sherlock Holmes Faces Death Univ. 

She's a Soldier, Too Col. 

She's for Me Univ. 

Shine On, Harvest Moon WB 

Show Business RKO 

Shrine of Victory (British) 20th-Fox 

Silent Bell, The RKO 

Silent Partner Rep. 

Silver City Kid (1944-45) Rep. 

Silver City Raiders Col. 

Since You Went Away UA 

Sing a Jingle Univ. 

Singing Sheriff, The, 1944-45 Univ. 

Slightly Terrific Univ. 
Snow White and the 

Seven Dwarfs (color) RKO-Disney 

So This Is Washington RKO 

Son of Dracula Univ. 

Song of Bernadette, The 20th-Fox 

Song of Nevada Rep. 

Song of Russia MGM 

Song of the Open Road UA 
Song of the Saddle (Reissue) WB 

Song to Remember, A Col. 

(formerly At Night We Dream) 

Sonora Stagecoach Mono. 

South of Dixie Univ. 

So's Your Uncle Univ. 

Spider Woman Univ. 

Spook Town PRC 

Spotlight Scandals Mono. 

Standing Room Only Para. 

Stars on Parade Col. 

Step Lively RKO 

Storm Over Lisbon Rep. 

Story of Dr. Wassell (color) Para. 
Strange Death of Adolf Hitler Univ. 

Submarine Base PRC 

Sullivans, The 20th-Fox 

Sultan's Daughter, The Mono. 

Summer Storm UA 

Sundown Valley Col. 

Suspect, The, 1944-45 Univ. 

Sweet and Lowdown 20th-Fox 

Sweet Rosie O'Grady (color) 20th-Fox 

Sweethearts of the U. S. A. Mono. 

Swing Fever MGM 

Swing Out the Blues Col. 

Swing Shift Maisie MGM 

jwingtime Johnny Univ. 



5038 
40 



8019 



32 
420 



424 
417 

403 



422 
8024 
5040 
8041 
313 
425 
426 

317 
461 
5202 

8034 

8036 

492 
404 
8013 

344 
422 

331 



8042 
8021 
457 

4314 

5023 
429 

4337 
8022 

405 

42 



5205 



408 

423 
5020 

404 
8020 



Reltate 

Stars Date 

Ramon Novarro-Gloria Marin May 25, '44 

Arthur Lake-Jane Lawrence Feb. 24,'44 

Wallace Beery-Fay Bainter Sept.,'43 

Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Not Set 

Louise Allbritton-Jon Hall Sept. 29,'44 

Jose Luis Jimenez Not Set 

Gary Cooper-lngrid Bergman 1944-45 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce May 26, '44 

Pat O'Brien-Carole Landis July 20,'44 

Susan Peters-Robert Young Not Set 

Edgar Barrier-Stephanie Bachelor July 26,'44 

Robert Walker-Donna Reed Mar.,'44 
Olsen and Johnson-Grace McDonald Oct. 13/44 

Dennis O'Keefe-Eleanor Powell June 30, '44 

Wally Brown-Gordon Oliver Block 5 

Chick Chandler-June Clyde July 25, '44 

Spencer Tracy-Signe Hasso Not Set 

Tom Conway-Kim Hunter Block I 

Warner Baxter-Nina Foch July 27/44 

Iris Adrian-Frank Jenks Apr. 22/44 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce Sept. 17/43 

Beulah Bondi-Nina Foch June 29/44 

David Bruce-Grace McDonald Dec. 10/43 

Ann Sheridan-Dennis Morgan Apr. 8/44 

Eddie Cantor-George Murphy Block 5 

Documentary on Greece Apr.,'44 

Simone Simon-Kurt Kreuger Not Set 

Beverly Loyd-William Henry June 9/44 

Allan Lane July 20/44 

Russell Hayden-Bob Wills Nov. 4/43 

Colbert-Temple-Woolley-Cotten Not Set 

Allan Jones-June Vincent Jan. 7/44 

Edward Norris-Fay McKenzie Oct. 6/44 

Leon Errol -Anne Rooney May 5/44 

Disney Cartoon Feature Reissue 

Lum V Abner-Mildred Coles Block I 

Louise Allbritton-Lon Chaney Nov. 5/43 

Jennifer Jones-Charles Bickford Special 

Roy Rogers-Mary Lee-Dale Evans Aug. 5/44 

Robert Taylor-Susan Peters Feb.,'44 
Edgar Bergen-"Charlie"-B*onita Granville June 2/44 

Dick Foran Oct. 2/43 

Merle Oberon-Paul Muni Not Set 

Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele June 10/44 

Anne Gwynne-David Bruce June 23/44 

Donald Woods-Elyse Knox Dec. 3/43 

Basil Rathbone-Nigel Bruce Jan. 21/44 

Dave O'Brien-Jim Newill June 3/44 

Billy Gilbert-Frank Fay Sept. 24/43 

Paulette Goddard-Fred MacMurray Block 3 

Lynn Merrick-Larry Parks May 25/44 

Frank Sinatra-George Murphy Block 6 
Vera Hruba Ralston-Erich von Stroheim Not Set 

Gary Cooper-Laraine Day Special 

Ludwig Donath-Gale Sondergaard Sept. 10/43 

John Litel-Alan Baxter July 20/43 

Anne Baxter-Thomas Mitchell Feb.,'44 

Ann Corio-Charles Butterworth Jan. 24/44 

George Sanders-Linda Darnell July 14/44 

Charles Starrett-Jeanne Bates Mar. 23/44 

Ella Raines-Charles Laughton Nov. 24/44 

Lynn Bari-Benny Goodman 1944-45 

Betty Grable-Robert Young Oct. 1/43 

Una Merkel-Donald Novis Mar. 18/44 

Kay Kyser-Marilyn Maxwell Apr.,'44 

Bob Haymes-Lynn Merrick Jan. 20/44 

Ann Sothern-James Craig Oct./43 

Andrews Sisters-Harriet Hilliard Feb. 4/44 



Running 

Time 



t— REVIEWED s 
M. P. Product Advance 
Herald Digest Synopsis 



Issue 



Page 



Page 



Service 
Data 
Page 



61m 
64m 
63 m 
59m 
73m 
82m 
63 m 
88m 

136 m 
72m 
66m 

lllm 
64m 

106m 
55m 



106m 


June 10/44 


1935 






61m 


Apr. 15/44 


1845 


1696 




101m 


July 31/43 


1579 


1057 
1971 

1983 


1655 


125m 


Apr. 1/44 


1826 


1431 




74 m 


Apr. 29/44 


1867 


1850 




80m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1786 
1850 




68m 


June 17/44 


1945 


1937 




100m 


Feb. 19/44 


1761 


1616 
1899 


1947 


85m 


June 24/44 


1957 


1746 




74m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1817 
1923 
1715 




71m 


Aug. 21/43 


1558 


1471 








1899 





May 27/44 
Dec. 4/43 
Jan. 15/44 

July 24/43 
Jan. 8/44 



191 1 
1654 
1714 

1579 
1706 



June 24/44 1957 



Apr. 22/44 
Sept. 4/43 
July 10/43 
Feb. 5/44 
Dec. 18/43 
May 20/44 
Apr. 8/44 



1857 
1522 
1414 
1741 
1674 
1897 
1834 



76m 


Sept. 25/43 


1553 


63m 


Mar. 18/44 


1802 


81m 


Nov. 13/43 


1626 


70m 


Jan. 22/44 


1726 


86m 


May 8/43 


1546 


60m 


Jan. 1/44 


1695 



1715 

1890 
1889 
1635 
1675 
1890 
1351 
1616 
1890 
1785 
1850 
1530 

1305 
1636 
1555 
1747 
1763 

1786 
1305 
1586 
1241 
1636 
1191 
1676 



63 m 


May 6/44 


1878 


1835 




68m 


Sept. 11/43 


1529 






67m 






1890 




60m 


Dec. 1 1 ,'43 


1665 


1635 




1 12m 


Mar. 11/44 


1794 


1457 


1947 


92m 


Apr. 22/44 


1857 


1675 


1947 


45m 


Aug. 21/43 


1495 












1958 










1835 




55m 


Nov. 27/43 


1646 












1635 




62m 


Jan. 1/44 


1694 


1654 










1983 




62m 


Apr. 22/44 


1858 


1785 




83m 


Dec. 25'37 


1782 






64m 


Aug. 2 1/43 


1558 


1471 




80m 


Nov. 13/43 


1626 


1241 


1818 


157m 


Dec. 25/43 


1685 


1416 


1947 


75m 


June 17/44 


1945 


1890 




107m 


Jan. 1/44 


1693 


1416 


1902 


93m 


Apr. 29/44 


1866 


1695 


1947 


59m 


Apr. 1 1/36 


1482 







1617 



TAKE It Big Para. 4327 

Take It or Leave It 20th-Fox 

Tall in the Saddle RKO 

Tampico 20th-Fox 425 

Tarzan's Desert Mystery RKO 413 

Tawny Pipit (British) Two Cities-GFD 

Taxi to Heaven(Russian) Artkino .... 

Tender Comrade RKO 416 

Texas Kid, The • Mono 

Texas Masquerade UA .... 

Thank Your Lucky Stars WB 303 

That Nazty Nuisance UA .... 

There's Something About a Soldier Col. 5017 

They Live in Fear Col. 5043 

They Made Me a Criminal (R.) WB 342 

They Met in Moscow (Rus.) Artkino .... 

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo MGM .... 

This Happy Breed (Brit.) Two Cities .... 



Jack Haley-Harriet Hilliard 

Phil Baker-Marjorie Massow 

John Wayne-Ella Raines 

Lynn Bari-Edward G. Robinson 

Johnny Weissmuller-Nancy Kelly 

Bernard Miles-Rosamund John 

Musical Feature 

Ginger Rogers-Robert Ryan 

Johnny Mack Brown 

William Boyd 

Warner Stars Revue 

Bobby Watson-Joe Devlin 

Evelyn Keyes-Tom Neal 

Otto Kruger-Clifford Severn 

John Garfield-Ann Sheridan 

Musical feature 

Van Johnson-Robert Walker 

Robert Newton-Celia Johnson 



Block 6 


76m 


June 10/44 


1934 


1786 




1944-45 








1890 




Not Set 








1899 




Apr.,'44 


75 m 


Apr. 1/44 


1825 


1636 


1947 


Block 3 


70m 


Dec. 1 1/43 


1666 


1362 


1847 


Not Set 


85m 


June 3/44 


1921 






May 24/44 


70m 


June 3/44 


1922 






Block 4 


101m 


Jan. 1/44 


1 693 


1635 


1902 


Nov. 26/43 


57m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1545 




Feb. 18/44 


59m 


Jan. 29/44 


1733 






Sept. 25/43 


127m 


Aug. 2 1/43 


1559 


1058 


1719 


Aug. 6/43 


42m 


June 12/43 


1546 


1019 




Nov. 30/43 


80m 


Dec. 18/43 


1674 


1545 




June 15/44 


65m 






1889 




July 15/44 


92m 


Jan. 7/39 


1957 






June 6/44 


80m 


June 10/44 


1933 






Not Set 








i 869 




Not Set 


115m 


May 27/44 


i909 







MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 8, 1944 



1991 



r— REVIEWED -*» 
M. P. Product 



Title Company 

This Is the Life Univ. 

Thousands Cheer (color) MGM 

Three Li-Hie Sisters Rep. 

Three Men in White MGM 

Three of a Kind Mono. 

Three Russian Girls UA 

Thundering Gun Stingers PRC 

Tiger Fangs PRC 

Tiger Shark (Reissue) WB 

Till We Meet Again Para. 

Timber Queen Para. 

To Have and Have Not WB 

Top Man Univ. 

Tornado Para. 

Trail to Gunsight Univ. 
Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A 20th-Fox 

Trigger Trail Univ. 

Trocadero Rep. 

True to Life Para. 

Tucson Raiders Rep. 
Tunisian Victory MGM-MOI 

Twilight on the Prairie Univ. 

Two-Man Submarine Col. 

Two Girls and a Sailor MGM 

Two Years Before the Mast Para. 



Number 
Prod. 
8012 
413 

427 



463 
406 

345 

4313 

8009 
4304 

8087 

8086 
314 
4303 
3311 
466 

5039 
428 



Release 

Stars Date 

Susanna Foster-Donald O'Connor June 2,'44 

Kathryn Grayson-Gene Kelly Jan.,'44 

Mary Lee-Ruth Terry-Cheryl Walker Not Set 

Lionel Barrymore-Van Johnson June, '44 

Billy Gilbert-June Lang July22,'44 

Anna Sten-Kent Smith Jan. I4,'44 

Buster Crabbe-AI St. John Mar.25,'44 

Frank Buck-Duncan Renaldo Sept. 1 0/43 

Edward G. Robinson-Richard Arlen July 1 5, '44 

Ray Milland-Maureen O'Hara 1944-45 

Dick Arlen-Mary Beth Hughes Block 3 

Humphrey Bogart-Dolores Moran 1944-45 

Donald O'Connor-Peggy Ryan Sept. I7,'43 

Chester Morris-Nancy Kelly Block I 

Eddie Dew-Maris Wrixon Aug. 1 8, '44 

Dorothy McGuire-Joan Blondell 1944-45 

Rod Cameron-Fuzzy Knight July 7,'44 

Rosemary Lane-Johnny Downs Apr. 24,'44 

Mary Martin-Franchot Tone Block I 

Bill Elliott-Bobby Blake May 14/44 

Documentary Apr. 28/44 

Eddie Quillan-Vivian Austin July I4,'44 

Tom Neal-Ann Savage Mar. I6,'44 

Jimmy Durante-Van Johnson June,'44 

Alan Ladd-Brian Donlevy 1944-45 



Running 
Time 
87m 
126m 

85 m 

80m 
60m 
59m 
79m 

65m 

82 m 
80m 



Herald 
Issue 
May 6,'44 
Sept. 18/43 

May 6/44 

Jan. 1/44 

Sept. 25/43 
Aug. 27/32 

Jan. 8/44 

Sept. 18/43 
Aug. 14/43 



Digest 

Page 
1878 
1541 

1877 

1694 

1554 

1957 

1706 

1541 
1579 



Advance Service 
Synopsis Date 

Page Page 

1416 

1079 

1971 

1786 

1958 

1457 

1786 

1531 

1676 
1696 
1850 
1456 
1457 
1971 
1923 
1923 



74m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1806 




93m 


Aug. 14/43 


1578 


1079 


1719 


55m 


May 20/44 
Mar. 1 1/44 


1898 


1890 




80m 


1794 




1947 


62m 


June 3/44 


1921 


1899 




62m 


May 13/44 


1887 


1746 




124m 


Apr. 29/44 


1865 


1696 





1923 



U-BOAT Prisoner Col. .... 

Uncensored (British) 20th-Fox 418 

Uncertain Glory WB 314 

Underground Guerrillas (British) Col. 5041 

Under Two Flags (Reissue) 20th-Fox 411 

Uninvited, The Para. 4315 

Unknown Guest Mono. .... 

Up in Arms (color) RKO-Goldwyn 452 

Up in Mabel's Room UA .... 

Utah Kid, The Mono 

(formerly Trigger Law) 



Bruce Bennett-Erik Rolf 
Eric Portman-Phyllis Calvert 
Errol Flynn-Paul Lukas 
John Clement-Mary Morris 
Ronald Colman-Claudette Colbert 
Ray Milland-Ruth Hussey 
Victor Jory-Pamela Blake 
Danny Kaye-Dinah Shore 
Marjorie Reynolds-Dennis O'Keefe 
Hoot Gibson-Bob Steele 



July 25/44 








1899 




Jan. 2 1/44 


83m 


Aug. 1/42 


1714 






Apr. 22/44 


102m 


Apr. 8/44 


1833 


1636 


1902 


May 18/44 


82m 






1890 




Nov. 26/43 


99m 


May 9/36 


1574 






Block 3 


98m 


Jan. 8/44 


1705 


1416 


1947 


Oct. 22/43 


64m 


Aug. 28/43 


1559 






Special 


105m 


Feb. 12/44 


1753 


1457 


1947 


Apr. 28/44 


76m 


Mar. 25/44 


1813 


1695 


1947 


Not Set 








1971 





VALLEY of Vengeance 
Very Thought of You, The 
Victory Through 

Air Power (color) 
Vigilantes Ride, The 
Virgin of Guadalupe 
Voice in the Wind 
Voodoo Man, The 



PRC 
WB 



UA-Disney 
Col. 

(Mex.) Maya 
UA 
Mono. 



WAC, a Wave, a Marine, A Mono. 
Walking Dead, The (Reissue) WB 
Watch on the Rhine WB 
Waterfront PRC 
Way Ahead, The (British) Two Cities 
Weekend Pass Univ. 
Weird Woman Univ. 
Welcome, Mr. Washington 

(British) Br. Nat'l-Anglo 

West of the Rio Grande Mono. 
Westward Bound Mono. 
What a Womanl Col. 
When Strangers Marry Mono. 

(formerly I Married a Stranger) 
Where Are Your Children? Mono. 
Whispering Footsteps Rep. 
Whistler. The Col. 
Whistling in Brooklyn MGM 
White Cliffs of Dover, The MGM 
Wilson (color) 20th-Fox 
Wing and a Prayer 20th-Fox 
Wintertime 20th-Fox 
Woman in the Window, The RKO 
Woman of the Town, The UA 
Women in Bondage Mono. 
Women in War (Reissue) Rep. 
Wyoming Hurricane Col. 

YANKS Ahoy UA-Roach 

Yellow Canary (British) Wilcox-RKO 

Yellow Rose of Texas Rep. 

Young Ideas MGM 

You Can't Ration Love Para. 
You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith Univ. 

Youth Runs Wild RKO 



464 Buster Crabbe-AI St. John 

.... Dennis Morgan-Faye Emerson 

Disney Aviation Feature 

5204 Russell Hayden-Shirley Patterson 

.... Jose Luis Jimenez 

.... Francis Lederer-Sigrid Gurie 

.... Bela Lugosi-John Carradine 

.... Elyse Knox-Sally Eilers 

344 Boris Karloff 

301 Bette Davis-Paul Lukas 

415 J. Carroll Naish-John Carradine 

.... David Niven-Stanley Holloway . 

8029 Martha O'Driscoll-Noah Beery, Jr. 

8027 Lon Chaney-Anne Gwynne 

.... Barbara Mullen-Donald Stewart 

.... Johnny Mack Brown 

.... Ken Maynard-Hoot Gibson 

5005 Rosalind Russell-Brian Aherne 

.... Dean Jagger-Neil Hamilton 

.... Jackie Cooper-Patricia Morison 

309 John Hubbard-Rita Quigley 

5032 Richard Dix-Gloria Stuart 

412 Red Skelton-Ann Rutherford 

491 Irene Dunne-Roddy McDowall 

.... Alexander Knox-Charles Coburn 

.... Don Ameche-Dana Andrews 

405 Sonja Henie-Jack Oakie 

.... Edward G. Robinson-Joan Bennett 

.... Albert Dekker-Claire Trevor 

.... Gail Patrick-Nancy Kelly 

9002 Elsie Janis-Wendy Barrie 

5206 Russell Hayden-Bob Wills 

.... Joe Sawyer-William Tracy 

423 Anna Neagle-Richard Greene 

343 Roy Rogers-Dale Evans 

408 Mary Astor-Herbert Marshall 

4318 Betty Jane Rhodes-Johnnie Johnston 

8033 Allan Jones-Evelyn Ankers 

430 Bonita Granville-Kent Smith 



May 5/44 
1944-45 



56m 



1890 
1850 



Aug. 13/43 


65m 


July 10/43 


1532 


1375 


1617 


Feb. 3/44 


56m 


Feb. 12/44 


1754 


1081 




May 14/43 


95m 


May 22/43 


1325 






Apr. 2 1/44 


84m 


Mar. 4/44 


1782 




1847 


Feb. 21/44 


62m 


Feb. 26/44 


1774 


1676 




Not Set 








1899 




July 15/44 


66m 


Mar. 7/36 


\957 






Sept. 4/43 


1 13m 


July 31/43 


1579 


986 


1719 


June 10/44 


66m 


May 13,44 


1887 


1850 




Not Set 


II 5m 


June 17/44 


1945 






Feb. 18/44 


63m 


Feb. 5/44 


1742 


1676 




Apr. 14/44 


64m 


Apr. 8/44 


1834 


1747 




Not Set 


90m 


July 1/44 


1969 






Aug. 5/44 








1937 




Jan. 17/44 


59 m 


Jan. i 5/44 


i7l4 


1599 




Dec. 28/43 


93 m 


Dec. 11/43 


1665 


1635 


1818 


Not Set 








1971 




Jan. 17/44 


72m 


Nov. 27/43 


1645 


1606 


1847 


Dec. 30/43 


55m 


Feb. 26/44 


1774 


1636 




Mar. 30/44 


59m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1785 




Dec/43 


87m 


Oct. 2/43 


1565 


1431 


1 766 


June/44 


126m 


Mar. 11/44 


1793 


1586 




1944-45 








1676 




1944-45 








1835 




Sept. 17/43 


82 m 


Sept. 11/43 


1529 


1431 


1655 


1944-45 








1923 




Dec. 3 1/43 


88m 


Dec. 18/43 


1673 


1531 


1818 


Jan. 10/44 


72m 


Nov. 20/43 


1634 


1554 


1818 


Jan. 25/44 


69m 


May 25/40 


1726 






Apr/20,'44 


58m 


May 13/44 


1886 


1079 




July 1/43 


58m 


Mar. 13/43 


1532 


1019 




Block 5 


84m 


Nov. 20/43 


1634 






June 24/44 


69m 


May 20/44 


1898 


1890 




Nov.,'43 


77m 


July 31/43 


1578 


1240 


1818 


Block 4 


78 m 


Mar. 4/44 


1781 


1763 


1947 


Oct. 22/43 


64m 


Oct. 9/43 


1573 


1531 




Block 6 


67m 


June 24/44 


1958 


1786 





ZIEGFELD Follies (color) MGM 



MGM Contract Stars 



Not Set 



1913 



Feature Product, including Coming Attractions, listed Company by Company, in 
Order of Release on page 1984. 



1992 



PRODUCT DIGEST SECflON, JULY 8, 1944 



WAR COSTS! 

225,382 CASUALTIES! 
I 200 BILLION DOLLARS! 
?5 BILLION MORE THIS YEAR ! 

KEEP ON 
SELLING 
BONDS! 

right by the side of our troops who never 
itop! All War Bond sales in July will be 
credited to Fighting 5th War Loan Drive! 

: Sponsored by War Activities Committee of Motion Picture Industry, 1501 Broadway, N. Y. C. 






mm 












Ifl 















L 




A STORY A$ f VB 
THB SATURDfy 

and 



MOT I 

HE 





ICTURE 




REVIEWS 

(In Product Digest) 

Mr. Winkle Goes to War 
Take It or Leave l't 
Dixie Jamboree 
Valley of Vengeance 



Exhibitors and Sales Heads 
Study Problem of Public's 
War-Rich Shift to First Runs 



Hairpins and Shoestrings 
Are Exhibitor Tools as 
Washington Says Wait 

Paramount Plans 25 to 30 
For New Season Schedule 

United Artists Ready with 
63 Planned or in Work 



VOL 156, NO. 3 



JULY 15, 1944 



Entered as second-class matter, January 12, 1931| at the Post Office at New York City, U.S.A., under the act of March i, 1879. Pub- 
lished weekly by Quigley Publishing Co., Inc., at 1270 Sixth Avenue, Rockefeller Center, New York 20, <V. Y. Subscription prices: $5.00 
a year in the Americas, $10.00 a year Foreign. Single copy, 25 cents. All contents copyright 1944 by Quigley Publishing Company. 







HISTORY REPEATS 

Parents' Magazine Annual Award for "most tal- 
ented juvenile star" again blazes the box-office trail 



1939 
MICKEY 
ROONEY 

And NOW 
MARGARET 
O'BRIEN 



WAR BULLETIN! HAVE YOUR BOND SALES FIGURES READY FOR FIFTH WAR LOAN REPORT BLANK! 




M-G-M presents the darling of "Lost 

Angel" in a glorious Star-Roarious Comedy 



THE EXHIBITOR 

.. A film geared 

^tnc\— \ 
Hon tops- 




MARGARET O'BRIEN 
CHARLES LAUGHTON 
ROBERT YOUNG 



7Xe Ot/imFWll£ 

(MOST 



with 



WILLIAM GARGAN • REGINALD OWEN • 'RAGS' RAGLAND • UNA O'CONNOR 

Screen Play by Edwin Harvey Blum • Based on "The Canterville Ghost" by Oscar Wilde 
Directed by JULES DASSIN . Produced by ARTHUR L FIELD 



Walter Winchell says in the NY. Mirror: 

(and syndicate) 

Theatres that exhibit 



)IM 





in turn orr 
eir cooling 
systems. 



11- k i a /*> i ✓ ^ r- r-vik Ji-rrM/^^// SYDNEY ZACHARY 

THE MASK OF DIMITRIOS greenstreet • scon • em f 



Because , 



, says Walter Winchell, 



THE MASK OF DIMITRIOS 



provides its own chills! 




PETER VICTOR 

LORRE • FRANCEN 



Directed by JEAN NEGULESCO • Screen Play by Frank Gruber • From a Novel by Eric Ambler 
JACK L.WARNER, Executive Producer . Produced by HENRY BLANKE 








DARRYL F. ZANUCK S 



Directed by HENRY KING 
Written by LAMAR TROTH 



The Triumph it took 50 years 
of film entertainment to achieve! 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



COLVIN BROWN. Publisher 


MARTIN QUIGLEY 

President and Editor-in-Chief 


TERRY RAMSAYE. Editor 


Vol. 156, No. 3 


OP 


July 15, 1944 



THEATRE in WAR 

THOSE glowing tributes to the constructive cooperation 
of the motion picture in the war cause which have been 
uttered in Washington might about now be underscored 
by a new and positive recognition of the status of the theatre 
as a part of the war machine. 

Once again theatres have been through a cycle of impend- 
ing crisis in shortage of repair parts for projectors and other 
equipments, and once again at the last minute temporary 
relief has been had. There has been a continuous state of 
tension. Further, theatres have been reduced in efficiency for 
the lack of Freon gas, a refrigerant. 

It is true that steel is a material of war. Freon is also 
much a material of war. The labour that goes into them is 
a war essential, too. 

But it appears and is declared that the motion picture is 
essential also — vitally essential on the home front where the 
materiel and the money are produced and delivered. 

One may wonder if the essential nature of the motion pic- 
ture on this big home front is well understood by the masters 
of the rationing. 

The War Department, when it has a message to be delivered 
on the screen, seems to know about it. It has spoken highly 
of the screen's performance. The Treasury Department knows 
about it — through a series of war loan campaigns. 

The motion picture is not an incidental and a luxury of war- 
time America. The Government has spent and is spending 
millions making pictures to tell the people. 

It is not entirely a favour to this industry to be maintained 
with the tools and materials with which to do its work. It is 
a service to the whole people, whose war this is, for which 
they work and pay. 

Empty seats and dark houses can sell no bonds, deliver 
no messages. 

The screen theatre is a war machine. 



NOW and then an eyebrow is lifted because this publica- 
tion makes occasional use of the phrase "the Govern- 
ment are". Nevertheless, it certainly are, utterly are. 
For a citation, just now consider that strange bleat on the 
radio the ether night emanating from the Office of Defense 
Transportation, crying aloud about unnecessary travel and wit- 
lessly including the movement of Hollywood stars, who have 
been about so much on appearances at army training camps 
and on bond selling tours. 

The implication was that the players from Hollywood were 
on pleasure tours and junkets. The fact is that for the stars 
the travel was travail, labours in behalf of the national cause 
and for the laudable representation of their industry. 

So recently as the inception of the Fifth War Loan drive 
there was a decided off-the-record deploring in the Treasury 
Department that the studios were not finding it possible, due 
to production pressures, to send an array of major stars on 
the road for the. campaign. The pressures were considerable 
and the heat evident. 

Now the ODT thinks they have been taking the road just 
for fun anyway. 

It is clear enough that the Government are plural, a-plenty, 
if they should get together with themselves, in any two depart- 
ments, they, or it, would be a miracle — and a service. 



FOR GEORGE SPELVIN 

THE metropolitan critics and their imitators have been hav- 
ing a field day about Mr. Cecil B. DeMille's "The Story 
of Dr. Wassell". They have found a saga ornate with 
movie sauce and glamours — hokum is the word, although they 
have not used it. And these critics do not like it, professionally. 
They are not the customers — and, in fact, not the customers' 
agents. Meanwhile, it has been doing conspicuously well at 
the box office. 

It is entirely true that the utter bitter realism of war is not 
stressed in the telling. It's movie war. It is true that the tale 
has been spiced with romance, perfumed with love and sex, 
made lush with scenery and sentiment. That is movie. That is 
DeMille. Since about 1913 he has been mostly box office, by 
never shooting over the heads of the great commonalty — 
that celebrated Common Man, sometimes known as George 
Spelvin. 

The keen dry wines pf art and literature, for which perchance 
our critics think they contend, are not for the many who so 
thoroughly enjoy a lawn festival with vanilla ice cream and a 
piece of cake crusted with cocoanut icing. There's a big place 
for that in the national dietary, too. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

THE Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of 
American Ideals includes on its roster a number of 
persons of outstanding capacity and attainment in the 
creative community of the motion picture. Since February 7 — 
as recorded in this journal February 12 — the industry, or Holly- 
wood, has been under charge by the Alliance of "a rising tide 
of Communism, Fascism and kindred beliefs that seek by sub- 
versive means to undermine and change this (the American) 
way of life. ..." 

The Alliance has been challenged by various organizations 
and groups of interest in Hollywood to support its charges and 
to make specific indications. 

So far nothing in that direction has been forthcoming. It 
would seem appropriate, even necessary, in so grave a matter, 
that specification and documentation be had, now — or else. 



GEORGE SEITZ 

THE passing of Mr. George B. Seitz removes from the 
scene a director of uniquely continuous contribution to 
the screen over a period of three decades. He came to 
the motion picture, equipped as painter, playwright and actor, 
in 1914, and found his first work in those first Pathe serials 
which were launched in a competitive flood after Mr. Edwin 
Thanhouser's "Million Dollar Mystery" had revealed the market. 
Mr. Seitz was at once script writer, director and actor in those 
now famed Pearl White thrillers. He moved along with the art 
and his pictures are to be found in the title lists of all the 
principal producing companies now in operation. In his direc- 
tion of the Andy Hardy series he demonstrated again, and in 
a new fashion, his special skill in serialization. He knew how to 
keep the customers coming. — Terry Ramsaye 



I 



THIS WEEK IN THE NEWS 



Mr. Mayer Tells All 

THIS is Arthur L. Mayer week in contem- 
porary periodical literature. He has taken his 
pen in hand to do a biographical piece for 
Harper's Magazine for July entitled "Prema- 
ture Obituary." 

He appears to have started with the Gold- 
wyn company, which gave him great impetus 
to go elsewhere. Mr. Mayer attributes his first 
turn of success to the fact that his custom of 
hanging around the office late to meet a show 
girl, free after the first act, was mistaken for 
diligence by Joseph Godsol, who in conse- 
quence promoted the young man. 

Again in the summer issue of The Public 
Opinion Quarterly, School of Public Affairs, 
Princeton University, an imposing and acutely 
scholarly academic review, Mr. Mayer has 
done a piece entitled "Fact Into Film." He dis- 
cusses the growing significance of the d©cu- 
mentary picture. He observes : ". . . we are 
witnessing the long-awaited recognition of the 
motion picture as a primary source of public 
information and education. A new industry, 
a new medium for mass appeal ... is being 
perfected. ... Its effect on the future is incal- 
culable." 

Nevertheless Mr. Mayer is probably calcu- 
lating right now. 



Pride ful Statistics 

DURING the first six months of 1944, accord- 
ing to the Hollywood Victory Committee's 
semi-annual report, performers representing 
every branch of the entertainment industry 
made 8,960 free appearances to sell Bonds, en- 
tertain the armed forces and help Red Cross 
and other relief drives. Victory Committee 
players traveled 866,000 miles during the six- 
month period, covering the fighting fronts 
from Greenland to New Guinea. In two 
months, 46 players visited patients in 64 Army 
and Navy general hospitals in 29 states. In- 
complete reports credit Hollywood volunteers 
with the sale of $102,670,000 worth of Bonds 
during the Fifth War Loan campaign. The 
8,960 appearances reported brought the record 
of the HVC to 29,788 appearances by 3,239 
performers since the Committee was organized 
three days after Pearl Harbor. 



Report Cards 



POSTCARD report forms devised in the 
simplest manner possible for the exhibitor to 
give complete information on his Fifth War 
Loan record of sales will be mailed to theatre 
managers throughout the country shortly, it 
was announced in New York Wednesday by 
R. J. O'Donnell, national chairman, and Ned 
E. Depinet, national distributor chairman. Both 
Mr. O'Donnell and Mr. Depinet made a strong 
appeal to theatre men to mail their report cards 
in to campaign headquarters before July 27, 
the extended closing date of the industry's 
Bond drive. 

"All through the campaign the national com- 
mittee emphasized that only one report will be 
requested. We intend to stick to that prom- 
ise," the drive chairman said. 

"In the past it has been extremely difficult 



STUDY problem of the war-rich swing to first 
runs Page 13 

FIFTH Loan drive showmen pledge sales 
effort on "E" Bonds Page 19 

EXPECT Paramount to offer between 25 and 
30 next season Page 22 

UA announces line-up of 63 films to assure 
future delivery Page 23 

THEATRE repair and replacement parts 
months away, U. S. says Page 26 



JUSTICE Department seeks to intervene in 
Goldman case Page 31 

ADMISSION tax relief is anticipated soon 
after war ends Page 31 

LABOR costs and gross are new British quota 
problems Page 34 

ZUKOR remembers when he made pictures 
talk in 1905 Page 40 

MclNTYRE warns of possible duty on films to 



Australia 



Page 42 



SERVICE 

Hollywood Scene 



DEPARTMENTS 

Page 39 Picture Grosses 
In the Newsreels Page 62 

Letter from Reader Page 48 

Managers' Round Table Page 51 



Obituaries 
Shorts on Broadway 
What the Picture Did for Me 



Page 50 
Page 44 
Page 48 
Page 45 



IN PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION 

Showmen's Reviews Page 1993 

Short Subjects Page 1994 

Advance Synopses Page 1994 



Service Data 

Short Subjects Chart 

The Release Chart 



Page 
Page 
Page 



1995 
1996 
1998 



to obtain proper reports from theatres. This 
time we have made it very easy. Simply fill 
out the few spaces on one side of the business 
reply card and drop it in the mail box," they 
urged. The card is self-addressed and no 
postage is required. 



Beachhead Service 

TEN days after Allied troops landed in Nor- 
mandy, the men were viewing the industry's 
gift film, Colonel E. L. Munson, chief of the 
Army's Pictorial Service, has reported to the 
War Activities Committee. The Colonel re- 
cently returned from overseas and said that on 
June 16 the troops saw their first film, Colum- 
bia's "Cover Girl" in Technicolor. The Army 
Overseas Motion Picture Service had been 
building up a sizable reserve in anticipation 
of D-Day, and hopes to follow the pattern of 
exhibition set in Normandy whenever mili- 
tary situations make it expedient in the con- 
tinuing drive forward. 



For the Records 

WORLD War II will be the most fully docu- 
mented ev.ent in history. The United Nations 
Training Film Committee and the National 
Archives in Washington, D. C, have taken 
steps to protect motion picture film recording 
the war taken by the armies of the United 
States, Great Britain, Russia and China. Capt. 
John G. Bradley, who is head of the motion 
picture division of the National Archives, and 
chairman of the Film Preservation Committee 
of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, 
has explained that the film will be preserved 
with a negative, a master positive, and a refer- 
ence projection print. The captain points out 
that this will guarantee full preservation and 
avoid the deterioration that has destroyed all, 
but about one-sixth of the footage taken of 
World War I. 



Sound 



Honors for Spires 

VALIANCY in battle has brought promotion 
and decoration for George H. Spires, until the 
war a reporter for Motion Picture Herald. 

Mr. Spires was a first lieutenant in the 
U. S. Army Tank Corps when he went into 
action at Montefiascone on the Italian front. 
He took and held a road junction against the 
Nazis while Fifth Army reserves moved up 
to consolidate. 

He has now been made a captain and has 
received the Croix de Guerre, which indicates 
that he was with a French unit in the engage- 
ment concerned. 



THEATRE men soon must pay 10 per cent 
more for having their sound equipment serv- 
iced. The increase will be the result of new 
contracts between Altec Service and RCA 
Sound Service, and the International Alliance 
of Theatrical Stage Employees. 

The contracts raise theatre sound engineers' 
minimum weekly pay from $84 to $92; and 
they give other concessions to the more than 
400 such workers employed by the two servic- 
ing companies. 

The War Labor Board has approved the 
Altec-IATSE contract, and is expected to ap- 
prove the one between RCA and IATSE. Pre- 
viously approved was a contract between the 
union and Warners, covering some 35 sound 
engineers. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



At the Front 

CHESTER WILMOT, correspondent for the 
British Broadcasting Corporation, reported this 
week how motion pictures helped Allied air- 
borne troops visualize the French terrain on 
the Normajidy peninsula before the invasion. 

"No crews in the history of the air force 
have been more thoroughly briefed than the 
air crews and glider pilots going to land an 
airborne force behind the German lines. 

' From aerial photographs the army cartog- 
raphers constructed the most detailed and ac- 
curate models of the sector where the airborne 
attack was to be made, from the coast inland. 

"The Royal Air Force borrowed this and 
used it to make a film. It gives you the im- 
pression of flying over the very coast of 
France . . . you saw features and landmarks 
as they came into view. You learned what to 
look for and when. . . . 

"One wall (in the briefing huts) was cov- 
ered with aerial photographs of the whole area 
and especially the. zone where this parachute 
unit was to land. . . . After viewing the film, 
studying the photographs and maps the troops 
were told to draw from memory the main fea- 
tures . . . they were not allowed to take a single 
note." 



UFA Sound Man 

THE LONDON Daily Mail in its Transatlan- 
tic edition reveals the name of the man who 
perfected the flying bomb which can't tell a 
military objective from a nursing home or a 
cathedral. He is, according to a Stockholm 
correspondent in a cable to the Mail, one Pro- 
fessor Oberth, and he got his training in the 
perfecting of mechanics as a sound-and-effects 
man for UFA films in Germany. But he is 
something of a mystery man. The correspon- 
dent could not uncover his first name, but re- 
ported that the professor was known to be a 
one-time Nazi-hater. * 



Soldier Vote 

FAVORITE among service men during June 
was Paramount's "Going My Way," the U. S. 
Army Motion Picture Service reported this 
week. Others, in order of preference, were 
MGM's "Bathing Beauty," Paramount's 
"Double Indemnity" and Universal's "This Is 
the Life." The preferences are determined by 
comparative grosses at the post theatre box 
offices. 



Writers 9 Draft 

TO Hollywood last week to enlist some more 
sinews of psychological warfare journeyed 
Philip Dunne, in peace time a Hollywood 
scenarist and now the director of production 
for the motion picture section of the overseas 
division of the Office of War Information. 
( Friday night in the Arbor Room of the Bev- 
erly Hills Hotel, 25 members of the Hollywood 
Writers Mobilization signed pledge cards allo- 
cating from four to six weeks of their time 



for the year to the writing of scripts for 
the films OWI will be sending into the enemy- 
occupied countries, as they become unoccupied, 
to re-acquaint their populations with democ- 
racy. The pictures are in addition to the 12 
which the Hollvwood studios will make for 
OWI. 

High on the list of nations for which the 
HWM is to provide material is Germany, al- 
though all the nations of the world are includ- 
ed, except the United States, whether friend, 
foe or anything in between. 

In addition to obtaining the 25 pledges, Mr. 
Dunne set up an editorial board, authorized to 
hold seminars for the purpose of working out 
policies, to handle the work that's to be done. 
The members of the board are Charles Brack- 
ett, Harold Buchman, Marc Connolley, How- 
ard Estabrook, Franklin Fearing, John 
Houseman, Talbot Jennings, Harold Koch, 
Emmett Lavery, Meta Reis, John Howard 
Lawson, Allen Rivkin, Robert Rossen and 
Harry Tugend. The films are to be made 
both in Hollywood and New York. 

Mr. Fearing is a professor of psychology at 
the' University of California at Los Angeles. 



Robot Blitz 

London Bureau 

LONDON'S film and legitimate theatres 
weren't spared during the recent blitz of the 
Nazi robot bombs. Although it has not been 
determined whether any of the theatres were 
damaged, or to what extent, the toll was taken 
in attendance. 

One London exhibitor estimated that most 
of the West End film houses were losing about 
$2,000 daily. There had been no talk of closing 
the cinemas, however, possibly because most of 
them could afford the losses much better than 
independent theatrical producers, he said. 
Poor attendance at the London stage shows 
since the opening of the robot blitz has closed 
about 24 West End legitimate theatres and 
has caused what veteran managers described 
as the "worst financial blight in London's mod- 
ern stage history." 

Only 10 shows survived, seven plays, two 
ballets and the Evergreen "Revuedeville," now 
in its 13th year, and the 175th edition of the 
Windmill theatre, where the management's 
slogan is "We have never closed." 

London's famous Covent Garden, 86-year-old 
home of opera and ballet, which since the war 
has been a dance hall patronized mostly by 
servicemen, will resume opera production next 
January when a new syndicate will take control 
of the house, it was reported this week. 



Donation 

ROBERT .NEAL, who manages the State 
theatre in Kingsport, Tenn., planned an auc- 
tion at a War Bond show in his theatre, and 
went on the air over the local radio station in 
an appeal for a pair of Nylon hose. Within 
an hour he got two pairs, and he is not sure 
whether patriotism runs high in his town, or 
if a small black market dealer was unloading. 



Voice in Policy 

Washington Bureau 

A NEW theatre advisory committee represent- 
ing all parts of the country will meet with offi- 
cials of the service trades division of the Office 
of Civilian Requirements July 20 to organize 
and discuss current and future problems in thea- 
tre operation, it was announced late Wednesday. 

The committee, named by Donald R. Long- 
man, division chief, who will preside, includes 
Edward L. Kuykendall, S. H. Fabian, Robert 
W. Wilby, Hugh W. Bruen, Joseph Bernhard, 
Claude C. Ezell, Joseph Blumenfeld, Martin 
G. Smith, Lewis A. Lotito, and William F. 
Crockett. The committee will be one of many 
set up by the War Production Board to give 
all industry a voice in the development of 
policies. 

Discussion at next week's meeting will focus 
on requirements to keep theatres operating and 
the role they play in the field of recreation. 
Specific subjects will deal with facilities and 
equipment, manpower and operating supplies 
for the nation's theatres. 

The committee is expected to implement the 
use of material now to be available for civilian 
use under the program worked out by the 
WPB.with the military high command during 
the past week. 



Trend 

MARKING a new trend in Hollywood's un- 
ending search for good short subject material, 
MGM has purchased "Sons of the Conquista- 
dores," a 16mm release, from the Princeton 
Film Center. Metro will enlarge the picture to 
35mm size and will produce it in Technicolor. 
The film originally was made in 16mm Koda- 
chrome as a two-reeler. MGM has re-edited 
it to one-reel length, has given it a new musical 
score and will release it shortly for theatrical 
distribution. "Somewhere in America" is the 
new title given it by the film company. The 
Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, for 
whom the subject originally was made, will 
retain both the 16mm title and distribution 
rights for South America after MGM has com- 
pleted its theatrical release in the U. S. 



Bargains via Television 

FILENE'S, Boston's No. 1 department store, 
has entered the television field with the forma- 
tion last week of a subsidiary company, Fi- 
lene's Television, Inc. The new corporation 
plans to file applications shortly with the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission for post-war 
operation of both frequency modulation and 
television stations. 



Service 

TWENTY-FIVE thousand surgical dressings 
have been made recently at the Warner film 
laboratory, Brooklyn, N. Y., by a special unit 
established with the cooperation of the Warner 
Club. The workers, mostly women, produce 
the bandages after working hours. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, published every Saturday by Quigley Publishing Company, Rockefeller Center, New York City, 20. Telephone Circle 7-3100; Cable address "Quigpubco, New 
York." Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, Vice-President; Red Kann, Vice-President; T. J. Sullivan, Secretary; Terry Ramsaye, Editor; James D. Ivers, News Editor; Ray Gallagher, 
Advertising Manager; Chicago Bureau, 624 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 5; Hollywood Bureau, Postal Union Life Building, Hollywood, 28. William R. Weaver, editor; Toronto Bureau, 
.242 Millwood Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, W. MT Gladish, correspondent; Montreal Bureau, 265 Vitre St., West, Montreal, Canada, Pat Donovan, correspondent; London Bureau, 
■4 Golden Square, London W I, Hope Williams Burnup, manager; Peter Burnup, editor; cable Quigpubco London; Melbourne Bureau, The Regent Theatre, 191 Collins St., Melbourne, Australia, 
: - CI iff Holt, correspondent; Sydney Bureau, 17 Archbold Rd., Roseville, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia, Lin Endean, correspondent; Mexico City Bureau, Dr. Carmona y Valle 6, Mexico Cityj 
■ Lu s Becerra Cells, correspondent; Buenos Aires Bureau, J. E. Uriburi 126, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Nafalio Bruski, correspondent; Rio de Janeiro Bureau, R. Sao Jose, 61, C. Postal 834, Rio 
de Janeiro, Brazil, Alfredo C. Machado, correspondent; Mc-ntevideo Bureau, P.' O. Box 664, Montevideo, Uruguay, Paul Bodo, correspondent; cable Argus Montevideo. Member Audit Bureau 
of Circulations. Ail contents copyright 1944 by Quigley Publishing Company. Address all correspondence to the New York Office. Other Quigley Publications: Better Theatres, Motion Picture 
Doily, International Motion Picture Almanac, and Fame. 



' vIOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



9 



THIS WEEK 



the Camera reports: 




J. D. Anderson, Jr 

CHIEF MOVING SHADOWS, above, is J. J. Fitzgibbons, president of the 

Famous Players Canadian Corporation, seen as he became a 

Sarcee Indian three weeks ago, in Banff, Alberta, at a ceremony witnessed 

by partners and managers of the circuit, gathered for convention. 

Chief Big Plume, of the Sarcees, presided. Chief Moving Shadows 

is in good company, some of his fellow chiefs being the 

Duke of Windsor and the Duke of Connaught. 




PARTY. At a Chicago testimonial to Frank Smith, 
new RKO circuit Chicago division manager, are Mr. Srnitr 
and Mayor Edward J. Kelly of Chicago. Home office 
and local executives attended and also many other 
associates of Mr. Smith. 



SAMUEL SEIDELMAN, 
right, who returned to 
United Artists' New 
York home office last 
week, after four years 
at Buenos Aires head- 
quarters. Latin-America 
supervisor, Mr. Seidel- 
man predicts dubbing 
of Spanish on Holly- 
wood films will be ac- 
cepted in Latin-Amer- 
ica only if done by 
every company. See 
page 34. 




Wt\ } i ' i if 

By Staff Photographed 




CITATION. The Academy of Motion Picture 

Arts and Sciences Research Council last week in Hollywood 

was cited by U. S. Army Chief Signal Officer 

Major General H. C. Ingles. Above, Colonel S. W. Stanley, 

who presented the citation, and Y. Frank Freeman, 

Council chairman. 




By Staff Photograph j 

A FIRST, for the Rivoli, New York. The theatre responded to its still currer 
manpower crisis by hiring a doorwoman. Seen above, on the job, 
she is Maria Monez, 18, of Philadelphia. 



10 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, I9« 




AT THE DEDICATION of Kalmine Recreation Hall, Camp 
O'Connell, Warrendale, Pa.: M. A. Silver, Warner zone chief; Father 
O'Connell, for whom the camp for underprivileged children is 
named; I. Elmer Ecker; Mr. Kalmine, Warner circuit general 
manager, and often the camp's benefactor; Harry Feinstein, 
Pittsburgh Variety Club chief barker, and Joseph Hiller. 




HENRY GINSBERG is 
now in charge of all pro- 
ductions for Paramount. 
He has been vice-presi- 
dent and general manager 
of the studio since join- 
ing the company in 1940. 
The appointment was 
announced this week 
by Y. Frank Freeman, 
vice-president. His addi- 
tional title is general 
manager in charge of 
productions for 
Paramount. 




"SARATOGA TRUNK". In the scene from the Warner picture 
of that name, above, Gary Cooper menaces Ingrid Bergman. 
The Edna Ferber best-seller rmay be prereleased around Thanksgiving, 
the company says. 

"ARSENIC AND OLD LACE". Below are Boris Karloff, 

Cary Grant and Peter Lorre in a scene from the Warner version 

of the stage play. Produced by Frank Capra, the 

picture will be shown to the public beginning in October. 




IN LONDON, at the finals in RKO's 

"Search for the British Frank Sinatra" at the 

Poyal Opera House are Bob Wolff, 

PKO British managing director, and 

Lady Cedric Hardwicke. John Menday, 

a Londoner, Middlesex Regiment, won the 

competition, £50 and a portrait of Frank Sinatra. 




MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15. 1944 





POST-WAR PLANNING was the topic of the B. F. Shearer Company 

executive personnel at a recent meeting in Seattle. The large 

coast equipment company is prepared to handle complete theatre equipment 

as soon as it is available for civilians. Above, in clockwise fashion, 

are Millicent Smith, B. F. Shearer, president, Homer Tegtmeier, Frank Harris, 

D. O. Selby, E. R. Bechtel, Errol Holland, Bjarne Moe, B. W. Ardell, 

T. L. Shearer, Ted Lay, Les Abbott, Ted Snyder, Joe Durant, 

William Kostenbader, H. E. Daigler and George Jacobson. All are 

executives or salesmen of the Shearer organization. 



By Staff Photographer 

JEROME SILVER, Merchant Marine war- 
rant officer, and former operator of the 
Cannon, Cannon Falls, and De Luxe, St. 
Paul, both in Minnesota, was a visitor to 
the New York home offices last week. 





PLAQUES to former chiefs of the War Activities Committee distributor division 
were presented Tuesday of this week, at ceremonies in New York,, by Ned 
Depinet, present chairman of the division. Above, with the recipients 
holding their awards, are: William Scully, Universal; George J. Schaefer, 
chairman of the WAC; Henderson M. Richey, Loew's; Leon Bamberger, RKO; 
William F. Rodgers, Loew's, and Mr. Depinet, RKO. 



COMMENDATION for its film, "Americans All' 
is in a citation to the March of Time, 
presented above to David Bradshaw, associate 
producer, by Dr. Arthur Compton, national 
co-chairman of the National Conference of Christians 
and Jews. The picture is reviewed on page 1994 
of the Product Digest section. 




FOR THE SPARS. This 
free poster, left, is being 
sent to exhibitors from 
Twentieth Century Fox ex- 
changes. It jibes with re- 
lease, July 27, by the War 
Activities Committee, of 
"Battle Stations", which is 
about the Coast Guard 
girls. Garson Kanin pro- 
duced it, and Ginger 
Rogers and James Cag- 
ney narrate. 



TRYOUT. Tito Guizar, 
center, tries "Rio de- 
Janeiro" on the set of Re- 
public's "Brazil", in which 
he co-stars with Virginia 
Bruce. Robert North, pro- 
ducer, left, gives a point- 
er; while Walter Scharf, 
studio music director, 
watches. 




12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



STUDY PROBLEM OF WAR-RICH 
SWING TO FIRST RUNS 



Seek Method of Assisting 
Small Exhibitor; Longer 
Runs Also a Factor 

Customers are leaving the neighborhood sec- 
ond and subsequent run theatres for first run 
houses downtown. 

The exodus, particularly marked recently and 
now at the peak, has stirred distributors and 
exhibitors to study the cause and effect of the 
patronage drift since the war, with a view to 
aiding the small theatre operator. At least 
one distributor, MGM, is now at work on a 
plan, blueprinted by William F. Rodgers, vice- 
president and distribution head, to equalize the 
application of Metro's sliding scale for indi- 
vidual situations so that the subsequent run 
exhibitor may find immediate relief. 

The percentage of increase in grosses at key 
city first run theatres is proportionately much 
greater than the rise in business at neighbor- 
hood houses, representing an unprecedented 
prosperity for the nation's de luxe theatres and 
resulting from a number of factors influencing 
wartime distribution and exhibition. 

Two Factors Are Noted 
By Most Executives 

Distribution and exhibition officials of New 
York and other key cities agree that although 
no accurate computation can be made of the 
percentage of patronage drift, experience has 
highlighted two important factors which con- 
tributed to the ever mounting first run grosses 
in comparison with neighborhood business. 

First : more patrons have more money to 
spend on entertainment, due to the public's 
increased income in the last three years. 

Second : the longer holdovers at first runs 
resulted in more patrons desiring to see pic- 
tures earlier rather than four, six, eight or 
10 weeks later at their neighborhood 
theatres. 

Other reasons cited are : 

The decrease in product released annually 
since Pearl Harbor, resulting in extended play- 
ing time and longer riots; 

The general improvement of product in the 
last two years, creating wider audiences; 

The increase in the number of servicemen, 
their families and friends, who have become 
entertainment seekers in impressive numbers 
in the key cities located near their military 
camps and bases; 

The increasing need for relaxation and en- 
tertainment on the part of millions of war 
workers whose weekly pay checks enable them 
to buy entertainment , despite the rise in admis- 
sion prices, at the nation's better theatres. 

The theatre boom, meanwhile, has created 
havoc with clearance, zoning, release date 
schedules, film rental price fixing and other 
factors in the distribution and exhibition of 
motion pictures. There is no indication of how 
long the first run holdovers will continue. 

In the opinion of Leonard Goldenson, in 
> charge of theatre operations for Paramount, 
and James M. Brennan, head of RKO's Met- 
1 ropolitan and New Jersey circuit operations, 
the market today "is a false market" and for 
, that reason it is difficult to determine how 
great the patronage drift from the neighbor- 
hoods to the first runs has been or whether or 
not the neighborhoods, in turn, have profited 



SAY BROADWAY HOLDOVERS 
HURT SUBURBAN HOUSES 

Exceptionally long holdovers at Broad- 
way's first runs in the past year, which 
caused the serious product jam among 
the downtown houses and created sev- 
eral new first runs on the Great White 
Way, have caused concern among 
metropolitan New York exhibitors. The- 
atre managers in Westchester, Long 
Island and New Jersey, in addition to 
operators in the five boroughs, say that 
the patrons who go to Radio City Mu- 
sic Hall, the Pa ramount, Capitol, Roxy, 
Strand and Hollywood are being drawn 
by the long run films away from their 
neighborhood theatres. By the time 
such pictures as "Going My Way" and 
"Lady in the Dark", each of which ran 
ten weeks at the Paramount, and 
"White Cliffs of Dover", seven weeks at 
the Music Hall, reach the suburban 
houses, most of their patrons already 
have seen them, the exhibitors claim. 



by the generally improved theatre business 
since the war. 

Mr. Goldenson expressed the view that first 
run business had increased to a greater ex- 
tent than the neighborhoods, but that the lat- 
ter theatres also had a fair share of the pros- 
perity. He said he didn't believe that first and 
second run neighborhood houses had suffered 
appreciably but agreed that perhaps the small- 
er theatres at the end of the run in the neigh- 
borhoods were bearing the brunt of the patron- 
age drift. Longer holdovers at first runs, 
especially the top productions, he pointed out, 
still were making money at the neighborhood 
houses. 

Says Nothing Normal About 
Theatre Business Today 

"There is nothing normal in the business to- 
day," Mr. Brennan said. "It is so jumbled that 
it's hard to judge just what the causes and 
effects have been on the neighborhood thea- 
tres. If it is true that increased ability to 
spend money on entertainment has driven pa- 
trons from their neighborhood houses to the 
first runs, it is also true that increased incomes 
have made it possible for people who couldn't 
afford to go to the movies during the depres- 
sion to attend their neighborhood theatres in 
greater numbers and more often. 

"Our experience in Metropolitan New York 
has shown that most of the theatres are mak- 
ing money. All of the houses have increased 
their admission prices. If attendance has 
dropped off somewhat, the advanced admis- 
sions, have made up the difference." 

Dan Michalove, National Theatres execu- 
tive, said : "There has been a more substan- 
tial increase in the first runs than in the neigh- 
borhoods. In fact, some of the neighborhood 
houses had to raise their admissions." Al- 
though longer runs at the downtown houses 
have drained off a little of the "potential audi- 
ences from the neighborhoods, in a city like 



New York, for example, this hasn't resulted in 
hardship for the neighborhood second runs." 
Mr. Michalove believes, however that many 
subsequent runs in the country are suffering, 
despite the fact that they, too, have increased 
admission prices. 

Most Key Cities Have Had 
Influx of Visitors 

According to Mr. Rodgers, "only a small 
part of patronage at the first runs is coming 
from the neighborhood theatres." Mr. Rod- 
gers advanced the view that almost every key 
city in the country has an influx of visitors, 
principally boys from camps, whose parents and 
friends arrange to spend some time with the 
servicemen during their furloughs. 

"Hotels, restaurants and theatres in every 
big city are crowded. Downtown theatres are 
doing terrific business, but you can't say that 
most of the patrons are those drawn away from 
the neighborhoods," he said. 

Last week, Mr. Rodgers told the trade 
press at a New York luncheon that MGM 
was working out a plan which would bring 
relief to subsequent run theatres affected by 
the long runs in first run houses. On Mon- 
day, he said that he would meet this week 
with district managers to complete details 
of the plan. The managers have been visit- 
ing theatres in their territories, he said, with 
the objective of equalizing the application 
of MGM's sliding scale for individual situa- 
tions. 

Elmer C. Rhoden, president of Fox Mid- 
west Amusement Corporation of Kansas City, 
declares that the circuit's "higher admission 
price theatres, which, of course, are first runs, 
show the largest percentage of increase in the 
grosses, indicating quite clearly that people now 
prefer to see the pictures early and see them in 
better surroundings. 

"The box office peak has not been passed, 
or even reached," Mr. Rhoden points out, add- 
ing, "We are now experiencing record 
grosses ; fluctuation of gross depending entirely 
upon the value of the product. 

"While the first run theatres are playing to 
more people and greater grosses, this has not 
worked to the disadvantage of the subsequent 
runs, as our subsequent run theatres are in a 
for more healthy condition than they have 
been at any time during the past 10 or 12 years, 
so there seems to be plenty of business for all 
if the pictures have entertainment value." 

Average Washington Loss in 
Neighborhoods 22 Per Cent 

The average loss in business on the part of 
neighborhood theatres to downtown first runs in 
Washington approximates 22 per cent to 23 per 
cent of the weekly gross, according to a survey 
of local neighborhood circuits. The primary rea- 
son may be ascribed to the present policy of longer 
runs in first run houses with the result that the 
cream of the business is absorbed by the down- 
town theatres. 

In summing up the reasons for this loss in neigh- 
borhood theatre business, Frank Boucher, general 
manager for the Kogod-Burka Theatres, said that 
in one of the theaters in his circuit, the Apex, 
business had increased because a new booking 
deal has resulted in quicker flow of product to that 
theatre. Mr. Boucher also pointed out that the 
isolated position of the Apex also was a factor in 
that neighorbood residents found it expedient to 

(Continued on following page) 



. MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



13 



PATRON SHIFT NEW PROBLEM 



(Continued from preceding page) 

visit that cinema rather than downtown houses. 
The other K-B houses, the Atlas and the Senator, 
have shown a consistent drop in patronage since 
the first of the year as against a similar period 
due to continued long runs in downtown houses. 

Other circuits, such as the Louis Bernheimer, 
Sidney Lust and Warner neighborhood houses, 
showed an approximately equal drop due to in- 
creased patronage at downtown first run houses, it 
was reported. 

Percentage Increase Lower 
In Cincinnati Subsequents 

Cincinnati operators of neighborhood theatres 
are agreed that business, measured by an over-all 
yardstick, although fluctuating rather than remain- 
ing constant, with upward and downward trends 
prevailing according to the picture shown, on the 
average, is about on an even keel. They further 
agree that the percentage of any increase in their 
business is definitely below that of the first runs. 
This, they say, probably is due to regular neigh- 
borhood patrons attending the first run showings. 

An exhibitor spokesman, summing up the situa- 
tion, said that there was a notice; ble increase in 
patronage when a better picture was played, while 
conversely, an average picture resulted in the 
box office curve pointing downward. 

The admission differential did not deter neigh- 
borhood patrons from attending first run show- 
ings, which they often combined with a shopping 
expedition or dinner date, he said. This is particu- 
larly true on Monday evenings when most of the 
downtown department stores remain open until 9 
P.M. and, of course, on Saturday afternoons and 
evenings, which, in many instances, afford the only 
opportunity for neighborhood plant workers and 
iheir families to "go downtown." 

Subsequents in Chicago Area 
Report 25 Per Cent Drop 

Showmen operating subsequent run houses in the 
Chicago area have experienced a drop in business 
for the past year estimated between 25 and 35 per 
cent, compared to similar periods in 1941 and 
1942, a check-up locally indicates. Ironically 
enough, the drop is due to the improved general 
business conditions. 

As Ben Banowitz, operator of four neighbor- 
hood houses, points out, "The subsequent run 
house always has cashed in on its bargain prices 
which attract the multitude of shoppers. Today, 
the average neighborhood patron has more money 
than he has had in several years, and consequently 
does little price shopping. He wants to see the 
new pictures earlier and sees them either in the 
downtown theatres or in the first run outlying 
house. In our own circuit we have noticed the 
development of this trend for the past eight 
months. Most of my houses are just about hold- 
ing their own." 

A spokesman for the H. and E. Balaban Cor- 
poration, operators of nine subsequent run houses 
in the Chicago territory, is of the same opinion. 
He adds that "a five to 15 cents difference in 
admission price no longer acts as a business attrac- 
tion. The patron today wants to go to a big 
house and see the big pictures as soon as possible." 

Says Average Patron Wants 
To See New Films Early 

I. Brotman of the Avaloe theatre in Chicago 
feels that the average neighborhood patron wants 
to see the new pictures as soon as possible, regard- 
less of the increased admissions. Russ Uswetsky 
of the H. and E. Balaban Theatre Corporation, 
Chicago, explains that the few nickels' difference 
in admission between the neighborhood theatre and 
a Loop house is no longer the barrier that used 
to keep thousands of movie-goers close to their 
own neighborhoods. Today, he says, regardless of 
the picture, Loop theatres are doing big business, 
while neighborhood houses, at the same time, do 
not reflect these prosperous times at the box office. 

Both St. Louis first run and neighborhood thea- 



BETTER PICTURES, NOT 
WAR, BRING GROSSES 

Neither the war nor the Consent 
Decree method of selling in smaller 
blocks has had as much to do with 
theatre grosses in the last three years 
as the quality of the pictures, William 
F. Rodgers, vice-president and distri- 
bution head of MGM, said this week. 
The key to the whole question of 
improved theatre business is "better 
pictures, not the war," Mr. Rodgers 
said. 

He advanced the view that there 
"was a time in our industry when we 
didn't have so many good pictures. 
But the industry, like any other manu- 
facturer of a product, whether it is 
automobiles or refrigerators, is con- 
stantly striving to improve our product. 
Just before the war, we had developed 
our talent — producers, writers, directors 
and actors — to the point where the 
product improved at greater pace. This 
was just a natural evolution of our busi- 
ness. And the public came into theatres 
because, we were offering them better 
pictures." 



tre operators agree there has been no decided shift 
here from neighborhood shows to the first run 
theatres. In fact the trend, if any, seems to be 
in the other direction. Box office receipts at the 
first runs have slumped slightly in the last eight 
weeks despite the increased prices. Most neighbor- 
hood theatres report increased business. Managers 
believe that the increased prices necessitated by 
the Federal admission tax boost is primarily re- 
sponsible for diverting business to neighborhood 
shows. In addition, as one manager pointed out, 
the neighborhood theatre presented only proved 
pictures for which advertising and publicity ground- 
work already had been laid. 

See No Decrease in Gross 
At Boston Neighborhoods 

Boston theatre men claim that there has been 
no decrease of patronage in the neighborhood 
theatres although business in the big downtown 
theatres has increased tremendously. 

"Neighborhood theatres are playing to more 
people than ever before in their history," said an 
executive of one of the large circuits in New 
England, "and they are having the best seasons 
in all time. The fact that our large downtown 
de luxe houses are filled to capacity does not mean 
in any instance that business in the neighborhood 
theatres has been cut down. I honestly believe 
that instead it had merely increased interest in 
pictures and in entertainment and that because of 
this both neighborhood and downtown theatres are 
profiting greatly," he said. 

"Patrons who formerly shopped for neighbor- 
hood pictures and waited until first runs came to 
their neighborhoods are spending more money but 
the result is that they are taking parties to the 
theatres and are hunting out long run pictures in 
the downtown area and still axe attending their 
neighborhood places of amusement." 

An official of the Keith circuit said that such 
pictures as "Home in Indiana" which often run 
for three or four weeks or even longer at the 
downtown theatres draw heavily from the neigh- 
borhoods but that this bv no means indicates a 
falling off in the neighborhood theatres. "On the 



contrary" said he, "it means that more people an!] 
going to the theatre. Legitimate houses in Bostoi||| 
are packed to capacity. Such huge places oH 
amusement as the Boston Garden with its 17,00(1 
capacity packed to the rafters for ice shows and! 
circuses. The race tracks draw thousands daily.l 
so, too, do the major league baseball clubs bu'i 
that merely spells added prosperity to all amuse a 
ments in this territory." 

Loew's Theatres told the same story. Here in 
was said that former regular neighborhood patronjl 
were obviously coming weekly to the Loew thea™ 
tres in downtown Boston but that a careful check? 
up showed also that the Loew theatres in outlying 
districts also were being better patronized that' 
one year ago. 

Charles Kurtzman, division manager for Loew'a 
expressed the belief that at least 40 per cent oj 
the current business is from former non-theatn| 
goers but also believes that these patrons havd 
become confirmed theatre addicts and will cod 
tinue to patronize the theatres long after the waj 
has ended. 

The M and P theatre circuit, with its hundred 
of theatres both neighborhood and downtown dj 
luxe in every part of New England said thaj 
business was better than ever before in all citie 
and in all neighborhoods and that there had been 
no subtraction of business from one district at thj 
point where it had merely gone to another section] 
Instead, they said, all of their houses were doinj 
better business than in the past several years. 

Prefer to Pay Higher Prices 
To See Pictures Early 

Alexander Manta, president of Indiana-Illinoi 
Theatres of Chicago, reports, "Customers toda; 
prefer to pay first run admissions and see th 
pictures early. Where we operate first run, tha 
is, not too close to a key center, our business ha 
picked up remarkably well since the war broke 

"Where we are subsequent run, our business ha 
suffered, so that in some cases we are doing n 
better business than pre-war and in others, evei 
less. We definitely know that where we are sub; 
sequent run our prior run competitors are doin« 
a better business. There is no question in ou 
mind, the first runs are milking the subsequents. 

David Weinstock, president of Raybond Thea 
tres, operating houses in New Jersey, Connecticul 
New York and Long Island, says : "We have los 
a lot of customers to first runs. People whj 
formerly came to our theatre in Paterson, N. J 
which is a subsequent run, because of the lo\ 
admission prices, now have more money to spen 
and go to the first runs. At the present time ou 
business is below that of two or three years ag 
and that goes 'in general for most of our house; 
In some spots we were obliged to raise prices i 
order to meet the situation." 

According to Harry A. Harris, president an 
general manager of Harris Theatrical Enterprise; 
operators of the Delmar and Dorsey, two theatre 
in upper Manhattan, "Business has kept up onl 
because of increased prices. We are in a ver 
poor neighborhood. The people here never wer 
to Broadway theatres until recently. Now we fin 
them going down town in large numbers. 

Sees Noticeable Drop in 
Weekend Business 

"Saturday and Sunday night business has had 
noticeable drop which may be traced partly to th 
fact that when we ran money games on thos 
nights, many people favored our houses in prefer 
ence to the neighborhood first runs which had n 
money games. Since the war, however, we droppe 
the games. Patrons who now have more incom 
go either to neighborhood first runs or to dow 
town houses." 

Stanley Colbert, treasurer of Interboro Circui 
which operates theatres in Manhattan, Bron? 
Brooklyn and Long Island, said: "Our businesj 
is better but our attendance has dropped, leavin 
the result the same as it was in the past. Ou- 
admission prices had to go higher in order to mee; 
increased operational costs." 



H 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 194 



"For the purposes of military secrecy, the 
names of men and some of the ships in this 
motion picture are fictitious, but the impor- 
tant incidents and the heroism are history." 




20th GEN 

WING AND A PRAYER (The Story of Carrier X) with DON AMECI-1 

HARDWICKE and Kevin O'Shea - Richard Jaeckel • Henry Morgan • Richard Crane Mi 
Dave Willock • Murray Alper • Directed by HENRY HATHAWAY • Produced by WILLI 



RY-FOX 



presents 



I A ANDREWS • WILLIAM EYTHE • charles bickford • sir cedric 

n • Renny McEvoy • Robert Bailey • Reed Hadley • George Mathews • B. S. Pully 
WHER and WALTER MOROSCO • Written for the screen by Jerome Cady 






ie most important event in 50 years of motion picture entertainment- DARRYL F. ZANUCK's"Vfl^T»liLSf6}8?t?f in Technicolor, 



FIFTH LOAN DRIVE SHOWMEN 
PLEDGE "E" SALES EFFORT 



Chairmen Wire Acceptance 
of Treasury Assignment; 
Officials Praise Industry 

Officially commended by the Government of 
the United States for its outstanding aid in 
putting the Fifth War Loan over its quota, 
the motion picture industry this week turned 
to final reports and an extra effort on behalf 
of "E" bond sales to individuals. The cam- 
paign closed officially July 8 but at the special 
request of the Treasury the industry will con- 
tinue to give special emphasis to the sale of 
the smaller units through July. 

On Monday added impetus was given the 
drive through July when Henry Morgenthau 
Jr., Secretary of the Treasury, said the mo- 
tion picture industry had "turned in its best 
performance in the Fifth War Loan Drive," 
and Ted R. Gamble, national director of the 
Treasury's War Finance Division, added : 

"The showmen of the 'Fighting Fifth' 
War Loan have done a magnificent job of 
War Bond selling. Bob O'Donnell and his 
National Committee have set a pattern for 
future Bond drives." He said the industry's 
accomplishments placed it in a "most en- 
viable position among all industries during 
the Fifth War Loan." 

Robert J. O'Donnell, heading the industry's 
efforts, at a dinner given by his committee for 
the trade press Monday night in recognition 
of its aid in the drive, translated Mr. Morgen- 
thau's and Mr. Gamble's words of praise into 
figures. He announced that throughout the 
nation some 75,000,000 Bond units were sold, 
or one and one-half for every man, woman 
and child in the United States, bringing a total 
dollar and cents figure of $17,981,000,000. 

Mr. O'Donnell also announced that there 
were 13,949 registered special events up to July 
8: 5,186 Bond Premieres, 1,069 Children's 
Premieres and 7,694 Free Movie Days. The 
total did not include special stage shows, auc- 
tions, etc. During the Fourth War Loan there 
were 3,182 premieres, 3,403 Free Movie Days 
and ten premieres for children. 

He added, however, that the "E" Bond sales 
were in the neighborhood of $5,000,000,000, 
against a national quota of $6,000,000,000, and 
that it was the aim of the industry to make up 
the balance of sales to individuals before the 
current month is out. 

Gamble Discusses Plans 
For Continued Drive 

Mr. Gamble spent last weekend in confer- 
ences with the industry's National Committee, 
discussing plans for the post-drive for "E" 
Bond sales. The national director explained 
that the Treasury was eager to take advantage 
of the publicity and promotion momentum gen- 
erated by the industry's campaign, and that 
the industry was an especially valuable agent 
in the sale of Bonds to individuals. 

At the end of last week Mr. O'Donnell an- 
nounced that the Hollywood stars who toured 
19 cities making 23 appearances, were respon- 
sible for the sale of $72,670,000 in War Bonds. 
Another group of stars headed by Gene Autry 
p visited 87 small towns in Texas and helped 
IJraise a total of $46,870,353. 

Mr. O'Donnell also received word from all 



COMPANY BOND PURCHASES 
TOTALED $52,845,000 

The corporate purchases of the dis- 
tributing companies and the major cir- 
cuits amounted to $52,845,000, Leonard 
Goldenson, chairman of corporate in- 
vestments, announced Monday. The 
buyers and their purchases follow: 



• 

Loew's, Inc $10,000,000 

Twentieth Century-Fox and 

National Theatres 11,000,000 

Paramount 15,000,000 

RKO Radio 4,000,000 

Warner Bros 5,000,000 

Universal 3,500,000 

Columbia 2,220,000 

Republic 200,000 

United Artists 500,000 

National Screen • 200,000 

Slcouras Theatres 100,000 

Wilmer & Vincent 100,000 

Fabian Theatres 65,000 

Century Circuit 150,000 

Randforce Amusement 250,000 

J.J. Theatres 100,000 

Shea Enterprises 60,000 

United Artists Theatres 200,000 

Telenews Theatres 75,000 

Trans-Lux 75,000 

Prudential 50,000 



$52,845,000 



exhibitor state chairmen that the post-drive 
was being received enthusiastically, and that 
programs, immediately formulated, had' been 
put into action. All the major distributors 
have added their promises of cooperation to 
that of the exhibitors. 

Ed Fay, state chairman of Rhode Island, 
wired headquarters in New York that his state, 
though oversubscribed, would "follow through 
until the last of July. . . . Theatres have Bond 
Premieres scheduled." 

District of Columbia 
Exhibitors Give Pledges 

Sidney Lust, chairman of the District of 
Columbia, telegraphed: "Met with local exhibi- 
tor committee ... all pledged 100 per cent to 
continue efforts unabated through the month of 
July." 

State Exhibitor Chairman Harry F. Shaw 
of Connecticut wired: "We will put on addi- 
tional stunts, to push sales. . . ." A. H. Blank, 
chairman for Iowa, joined the chorus. So did 
C. C. Moskowitz, chairman for the New York 
metropolitan district, who said that the giant 
cash register in Times Square would continue 
to "function full blast throughout the month, 
and all of our Bond selling efforts in the New 
York area will go on with undiminished vigor 
to the very finish." 

E. J. Hudson, Michigan chairman, wired 
that all exhibitors had been urged "to continue 
using their special trailers and extra personnel 
to handle processing of Bond sales." Harry 
H. Lowenstein, chairman for Northern New 
Jersey, telegraphed that "Northern New Jer- 
sey will be behind you 100 per cent. We have 
arranged for additional Bond premieres, Bond 
shows, rallies and other activities." 

George L. Tucker wired from New Mexico, 



where he is state chairman : "We are grateful 
for the additional time as it will give us an op- 
portunity to reach our quotas, which we will 
do." He added that he was contacting exhibi- 
tors "who have not held Bond premieres." 

Wired William Miskell of Nebraska: "All 
Nebraska towns are exceeding quota, but we 
assure you that exhibitors will maintain intense 
activity during July." 

It was announced at last week's end that 
Claude F. Lee, who had been acting as the 
industry's consultant to the U. S. Treasury, 
had returned to his post as public relations di- 
rector for Paramount. 

$6,000,000,000 Recorded on 
Times Square Register 

This week the giant cash register in New 
York's Times Square, heralding the latest sale 
figures for the state, approached the six bil- 
lion mark. At the register itself, well over 
two million dollars in Bonds were sold, and 
will continue fully staffed with salesmen and 
bookkeepers until midnight of July 31. 

Last week in Newport, R. I., high ranking 
naval officers helped fill the Paramount theatre 
for the only short subject premiere on record 
— "Devil Boats," a Warner Brothers' two reel 
film— with Bond sales totalling $550,000. 

In the latest of projection room premieres 
Allen Usher, Paramount's district manager in 
Chicago, exhibited "The Story of Dr. Was- 
sell" to prominent civic leaders and sold $3,- 
136,000 in Bonds. 

Ben Amsterdam, exhibitor chairman for 
Southern New Jersey and president of the At- 
lantic Theatres of New Jersey, announced that 
every day remaining in July would be Free 
Movie Day in his circuit of houses. ; 

The state chairman for Florida, James L. 
Cartwright, announced that his state held 36 
premieres, mostly in small towns, selling 31,736 
units of Bonds valued at $11,057,375. Florida's 
quota of $30,000,000, more than twice that of 
the Third War Loan and 9 million more than 
the Fourth, was better than realized as the 
drive drew to its official close last Saturday. 

The city of Fall River in Massachusetts, 
with the Interstate Empire managed by Wil- 
liam S. Cushing, and the Interstate Durfee 
managed by Paul Slayer spearheading the 
drive, exceeded its $12,000,050 quota before 
entering the post-drive period. 

"Going My Way" Premiere 
Brings $450,000 Total 

With "Going My Way" the Durfee sold 
$450,000 in "E" Bonds, the while a stage show, 
"Direct Hit," put on by servicemen and women 
at the Empire brought in $1,126,000. Bonds 
of a larger denomination sold at the Empire 
came to $4,120,000, the two premieres totalling 
$5,786,000 in value of Bonds sold. 

The original goal in Omaha, Neb., was $15,- 
000,000, but the first of a series of promotions 
doubled that figure in sales, and two days be- 
fore the drive's end the total sale figure for the 
city was $32,000,000, and for Douglas county 
$42,000,000. The main support of the drive 
was several premieres and special Bond shows, 
a sell-out premiere at the Paramount theatre 
netting a total of $5,000,000. The grand total 
did not include Free Movie Day and six mati- 
nees children's premieres, the totals of which 
are yet to be announced. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 

I ■ 



19 



togs it one of the 

Jhole year! Smosh-ng past C° A y s 

Day, ° T n ' '"Haute Newark and many 
Louisville, Terre Haute ^ ^ 





l on McCallister 
Walte V Brenn Cho lo te Greenwaad 

, Jean H n a e v e C ; a War Band - Cha, Dingle 

Produced by ANDRE DAVEN 



JEANNE CRAIN 

h ' its stardom for a gli«»ering 
marqu ee future in er first 
big role! "She's got star- 
lig ht in her eyes!" roves 
,he New York Doily News. 




JUNE HAVER 



, beautiful e* am P le 
20 th's skill in star-bu.Jd.ng. 
•She's recommended for the 
low whistles an 
wolves!" sa 



. . and watch for another 
star discovery from 20th 

..VIVIAN BLAINl the 

new Cherry Blonde in 
""Greenwich Village"! 



FIGURES TOO WITH PIN UP GIRL • THE EVE GF ST. MARK • THE SUNG OF BERNADETTE • BUFFALO BILL 



MGM Planning to I 
Resume Blocks of 



Expect Paramount to 
Offer 25-30 in1 944-45 



Fourteen Completed, Eight 
Shooting, 24 in Varied 
Stages of Preparation 

by RED KANN 

in Hollywood 

Although Paramount has not yet determined 
the number of its releases for 1944-45, the 
probability is it will hover between 25 and 30. 

This will approximate the level maintained 
throughout the current season, which finds 27 
features on regular release, "Lady in the 
Dark," "The Story of Dr. Wassell" and "Go- 
ing My Way," as specials, plus "The City 
That Stopped Hitler" and "Memphis Belle." 
Having played as a roadshow, "For Whom the 
Bell Tolls" will go into regular distribution 
next season. 

Paramount, meanwhile, is proceeding steadily 
with production. Fourteen features are com- 
pleted — many of them months ago — eight are 
currently shooting and a battery of writers is 
working over preliminary or final scripts on a 
potential 24 more. The latter group, of course, 
must viewed in the light of normal production 
hazards. Some stories may not jell and, there- 
fore, may be deferred. In some instances, star- 
ring assignments • pile up to an extent which 
obviously presages many months before these 
tentative vehicles can be launched. 

Has Substantial Backlog 

Here is the company's backlog, these being 
attractions which are finished and available, 
with no indication at this early point as to what 
is to be released when, although the majority 
are believed heading for the 1944-45 program : 

"And Now Tomorrow," with Loretta Young, 
Alan Ladd and Susan Hayward; producer, 
Fred Kohlmar ; director, Irving Pichel ; "Bring 
on the Girls," Veronica Lake, Sonny Tufts, 
Eddie Bracken; producer, Fred Kohlmar; di- 
rector, Sidney Lanfield; in color. "French- 
man's Creek," Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cor- 
dova ; producer, David Lewis ; director, Mit- 
chell Leisen ; in color ; "Incendiary Blonde," 
Betty Hutton, Arturo de Cordova; producer. 
Joseph Sistrom ; director, George Marshall ; in 
color. 

"The Man in Half Moon Street," Nils As- 
ther, Helen Walker ; producer, Walter Mac- 
Ewen; director, Ralph Murphy; "Ministry of 
Fear," Ray Milland, Marjorie Reynolds; pro- 
ducer, Seton Miller ; director, Fritz Lang. "Na- 
tional Barn Dancei"^Ifean^^jsjj^^,^^obert 
Benchley; producer, Walter MacFwen; direc- - 
tor, Hugh Bennett. "Our Hearts Were Young 
and Gay," Gail Russell, Diana Lynn; producer, 
Sheridan Gibney; director, Lewis Allen. 

"Practically Yours" Scheduled 

"Practically Yours," Fred MacMurray, 
Claudette Colbert; producer, Harry Tugend; 
director, Mitchell Leisen. "Rainbow Island," 
Dorothy Lamour, Eddie Bracken ; associate 
producer, E. D. Leshin; director, Frank Tut- 
tle; in color. "Road to Utopia," Bing Crosby, 
Bob Hope, Dorothy Lamour; producer, Paul 
Jones; director, Hal Walker. "Till We Meet 
Again," Barbara Britton, Ray Milland; pro- 
ducer, David Lewis; director, Frank Borzage; 
"Dark Mountain," Robert Lowery, Ellen 
Drew ; producers, Pine-Thomas ; director, 
William Berke. "One Body Too Many," Jack 



Haley, Jean Parker ; producers, Pine-Thomas ; 
director, Frank McDonald. 

In various stages of production are : "A 
Medal for Benny," Dorothy Lamour, Arturo 
de Cordova ; producer, Paul Jones ; director, 
Irving Pichel. "Her Heart in Her Throat," 
Joel McCrea, Gail Russell; associate produc- 
er, John Houseman; director, Lewis Allen. 
"Here Come the Waves," Bing Crosby, Betty 
Hutton, Sonny Tufts; producer-director, Mark 
Sandrich ; "Kitty," Paulette Goddard, Ray Mil- 
land; producer, Karl Tunberg; director, Mit- 
chell Leisen. "Murder, He Says," Fred Mac- 
Murray, Helen Walker; producer, E. D. Lesh- 
in; director, George Marshall. 

"Out of This World," Veronica Lake, Eddie 
Bracken, Diana Lynn ; producer, Sam Coslow ; 
director, Hal Walker. "Two Years Before the 
Mast," Alan Ladd, William Bendix, Brian 
Donlevy ; producer, Seton Miller ; director, 
John Farrow. "Double Exposure," Chester 
Morris, Nancy Kelly; producers, Pine- 
Thomas ; director, William Berke. 

Number in Preparation 

Preparing — chiefly in story treatment and 
script phases — are: 

"Ambassador in White"; "Cross My Heart," 
which is discussed for Miss Hutton, Tufts and 
Barry Fitzgerald; "Duffy's Tavern," with 
Hope and Bendix; "Eldorado"; "Girl's Town," 
for Hope; "The Lost Weekend," which 
Charles Brackett would produce and Billy Wil- 
der direct; "Miss Susie Slagle's," for Tufts 
and Betty Field; "Olympia," for Brackett- 
Wilder ; "Our Hearts Were Growing Up," 
with Miss Russell and Bill Edwards, and Ken- 
neth MacGowan p-oducing. "Prince Charm- 
ing," with Kohlmar producing; "Princess on 
the Warpath," starring Miss Lamour. 

Also: "Rainbow's End," with MacGowan 
producing; "Rurales," with C. B. De Mille pro- 
ducing and directing; "Sally O'Rourke," for 
Ladd and Stanley Clements, with Leshin pro- 
ducing; "Sophie Cooper"; "Stork Club," for 
Miss Hutton, with Kohlmar producing; 
"Sword of Gascony" ; "To Each His Own," 
contemplated with Brackett producing ; "Torch 
Song," with Miss Hutton ; "The Trouble With 
Women," which Seton Miller would produce ; 
"Victoria Grandolet," for production by 
Houseman and direction by Leisen ; "The Vir- 
ginian," with Donlevy starred and Paul Jones 
producing, in color, and an untitled ghost story 
planned by MacGowan and Miss Field. 

Wallis Films Not Determined 

Not finally planned are Hal B. Wallis' pro- 
duction's, but "The Searching Wind," Lillian 
Hellman play, is viewed as likely to lx his 
first. Similarly undetermined is B. G De Syl- 
va's program under his newly established unit. 
Whether he will take over one or more in the 
list of futures mentioned remains to be seen. 

Pine-Thomas will produce at least six for 
1944-45 and may go as high as nine. The 
larger number will be determined on the basis 
of Paramount's anticipated requirements as the 
new season grows closer. Next for them will 
be "Dangerous Passage," which goes into work 
August 10. Also planned are "Homesick An- 
gel" and "Hillbilly Symphony." 



Bob Crosby Joins Marines 

Bob Crosby has joined the 5th Marine Division 
at Camp Pendleton as a second lieutenant. 



12, Says Rodgers 

To comply with what it believes is the preferenc I i 
of the majority of exhibitors, MGM will endeavo j 
to resume the release of pictures in blocks of 1- ; 
William F. Rodgers, vice-president and genera 
sales manager, declared last week at a luncheo; ! 
of company officials and trade press representative 
at the Hotel Astor, New York. 

The company has set no definite number o g, 
releases for the next season and the total will b | 
determined by the existing conditions as releas I 
groups are made up throughout the season, Mr W. 
Rodgers stated. MGM will have 35 and possibhi 
36 pictures in release this season, and Mr. Rodger 1 
indicated no reason to believe next season's tota j 
would vary sharply from that number. 

Pictures to be released this season include 
"Dragon Seed," "The Seventh Cross," "Barbar; j 
Coast Gent" and "Lost in a Harem." Amonj! 
September releases will be "Kismet" and "Mrs! 
Parkington." In October, "Marriage Is a Privat [ 
Affair." "Maisie Goes to Reno," and "An Ameri I 
can Romance." "An American Family" is schedulec 
for November and "National Velvet" for Decern . 
ber.- 

Mr. Rodgers said that no specific number of .pic 
tures could be counted upon from the company' j. 
British production organization. Contribution] 
from that source depend upon what can be mad'i 
there during the coming months and the adapta 
bility of the product to the company's progran i 
here. 

On July 19, "The~5eventh Cross" will be trade I 
screened in all exchange centers. "Dragon Seed' i 
will be shown July 20, July 21, and July 28. "Bar : 
bary Coast Gent" is set for nationwide screening 
August 1. Tentative date set for "Maisie Goes t( t 
Reno" and "Lost in a Harem" is August 10 
"Marriage Is a Private Affair" August 14 ; "Kis 
met" and "Mrs. Parkington" August 28. 

Columbia Holds Third 
Sales Convention 

Columbia's third and final meeting in the curren 
series of regional sessions was held Tuesday 
through Thursday at the St. Francis Hotel, Sat 
Francisco. Jack Cohn, vice-president, opened th< 
session, welcoming the delegates and then turne( j 
the meeting over to A. Montague, general sale j 
manager, who presided during the remainder of tin 
meeting. Both Mr. Montague and Rube Jackter 1 
assistant sales manager, addressed the delegates |,s 
George Josephs, manager of sales accounting 1 1 
Hank Kaufman, manager of exchange operations 1 
Joseph A. McConville, vice-president in charge o |j 
foreign distribution, and Joseph Friedman, manag Ij 
ing director of Great Britain, were present at thill 
meeting. 

I 

RKO Theatre Managers 
Hold Chicago Meeting 

Harold Mirisch, chief of RKO theatres booking 
department ; Harry Mandel, director of advertis I 
ing and publicity, and William Howard, assistan Ij 
to Sol A. Schwartz, general manager of RKO' jl 
out-of-town theatres, were in Chicago last weel I 
attending an RKO managers meeting which Mr | • 
Schwartz had called in the Chicago division. Fol j 
lowing the meeting Mr. Mirisch left for Holly I 

Frank Smith and Harry Schreiber, newly-ap ]| 
pointed division manager, and assistant, respec \\ 
tively, of the Chicago territory of RKO theatres ]t 
were honored at a press party given at the Bis j 
marck Hotel, Chicago, by Mr. Schwartz. 



Republic Closes Contract 

Republic Pictures Corporation has closed a con 
tract for its 1944-45 product with M. & P. theatres 
operating 117 houses in New England territory 
M. J. Mullin and Chester Stoddard of M. & P 
negotiated the deal with J. R. Grainger, president 
Jack Davis and Sam Seletsky, of Republic. 



22 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 194. 



JA ANNOUNCES LINEUP OF 63 
rO ASSURE FUTURE DELIVERY 




UNITED ARTISTS sales executives convened this week at the Hotel Waldorf-Astoria. Above, 
facing the camera: Gradwe/f Sears, Neil Agnew, Edward C. Raftery, Joseph C often, 
John Haskins, Lou Pollock, W. E. Callaway. With their backs to the camera are Carl 
Leserman and Hugh Owen. 



Eastern Meeting Is Told Five 
Await Release, Fifteen Are 
in Work, 28 Planned 

United Artists Monday announced the most 
.aborate production plans in the company's 
istory, designed to assure systematic delivery 
t product stretching deep into 1946. The 
rogram includes 63 pictures, 48 of which were 
resented at the sales meeting at the Waldorf- 
.storia Hotel in New York by Gradwell Sears, 
ice-president in charge of distribution, and 
arl Leserman, general sales manager. The 
rtal releases are for the balance of this year's 
rogram, for the 1944-45 season and the re- 
minder projected for 1945-46. 

Approval of contracts for 15 additional pro- 
uctions were voted Tuesday by the UA board 
f directors meeting at the home office. These 
fcns were added to the 48 disclosed Monday by 
Ir. Sears. 

This program of top pictures and the regu- 
jrity of release was termed the greatest for- 
ard step taken by the company in its history 
y Edward C. Raftery, president. It was made 
ossible, he said, not only by constructive 
round work along production lines but by 
.■arrangement of company management which 
ssures not only this present favorable setup, 
jt a continuation of it into the future. 

''our in Production, 
Ueven in Preparation 

Attending sales representatives were told 
tat in addition to five pictures completed and 
waiting release, four others were in produc- 
on, 11 more were nearing final script and 
isting stages, while 28 others were planned. 

Pictures completed and awaiting release are 
)avid O. Selznick's "Since You Went Away," 
nd "Double Furlough," Hunt Stromberg's 
Guest in the House," Edward Small's "Abroad 
'ith Two Yanks" and Seymour Nebenzal's 
Summer Storm." 

The four pictures now before the cameras 
re: Benedict Bogeaus' "Dark Waters," Sol 
.esser's "3 Is a Family," Lester Cowan's "To- 
morrow the World," and Bing Crosby's first 
or United Artists, "The Great John L." 

Additional product is to be supplied under 
le approved contracts by Charles R. Rogers, 
irnold Pressburger, Lester Cowan, Benedict 
iogeaus, Seymour Nebenzal, Angelus Produc- 
ons and Constance Bennett, in addition to a 
tries of color-cartoons which again place UA 
l the short subject market. 

leal for Six Pictures 
lade with Rogers 

A long-term deal for six pictures was made 
( ith Mr. Rogers. These will be in addition to 
High Among the Stars," starring Jane Pow- 
II, which is now in production. Arnold Press- 
urger'will deliver two. The first of these is 
■om "Set the Wild Echoes Flying," a Saturday 
'yening Post story which Zoltan Korda will 
irect, and the second will be "Driftwood." 
The new contract with Lester Cowan was 
xtended to include a film starring Greta Garbo. 
G.I. Joe" and "Tomorrow the World" are 
ow in work under the Cowan banner. Three 
-dditional pictures will be made by Benedict 
•ogeaus. 

Seymour Nebenzal will produce "Mayerling" 



and two other films, under a revised agreement 
with UA. Angelus Productions was granted 
a contract to deliver one picture, not named. 
"Paris Underground" will be made by Con- 
stance Bennett and directed by Gregory Ratoff. 

Plastic Products, Inc., will produce the car- 
toon series planned. A long-term contract has 
been agreed upon for delivery of four Techni- 
color subjects annually. John Sutherland, for- 
merly with Walt Disney, heads Plastics. The 
title of the first cartoon is "Cross-Eyed Bull." 

The balance of the company's lineup includes 
product from the following producers : 

Vanguard will deliver "The House of Dr. 
Edwardes" ; Sol Lesser, "Civilian Clothes" ; 
Benedict Bogeaus, "There Goes Lona Henry" ; 
William Cagney Productions will account for 
"Blood on the Sun," "Port Royal," "Only the 
Valiant," "Bugles in the Afternoon," "The 
Stray Lamb" and an untitled mystery-love 
story. Lester Cowan plans "G. I. Joe" and 
"Woman of the Sea." From Charles R. Rog- 
ers, "High Among the Stars," "My Wild Irish 
Rose," "Angel on My Shoulder" and "One 
Man's Family." 

Edward Small Program 
Calls for Eight Pictures 

Edward Small's program calls for "When 
the Cat's Away," "Bella Donna," "Cagliostro," 
"Valentino," "Notorious Nancy Grey," "Kate 
Fennigate," "Twin Beds" and "Brewster's 
Millions." Hunt Stromberg, "Dishonored 
Lady" and "This Is Life." Producing Art- 
ists will deliver "Love Is Where You Find 
It," "High Spirit," "Singing City," "The 
Blackbirder" and "Of Thee I Sing." Pro- 
ducers Corporation, "This Crazy, Lovely 
World," "The New Cabinet of Dr. Caligari," 
"The Old West" and "O'Brien's Navy." Sey- 
mour Nebenzal will produce "Mayerling" and 
"S.S. Titanic" and from Andrew Stone, "Miss 
America," "Sensations of 1946" and "Victory 
Parade." 

Seated on the dais at the convention sessions, 
in addition to Mr. Raftery, Mr. Sears and Mr. 
Leserman, were J. J. Unger, Harry Gold, Ed- 
ward Schnitzer and Louis Pollock. Among 
the other home office executives in attendance 
were: Harry Buckley, Paul Lazarus, Sr., 



Charles Steele, Walter Gould, Harry Muller, 
Phil Dow, Manny Silver stone, Steve McGrath 
and Jack Wrege. 

These producers, players and representatives 
joined the district and branch managers at 
luncheon on Monday : Grace Rosenfield, Hugh 
Huber, Fred Wilkins, Budd Rogers, Seymour 
Poe, Harry Kosiner, David E. Weshner, Sey- 
mour Nebenzal, Edward Peskay, Henry Brash, 
Neil Agnew, Hugh Owen, John Harkins, 
William Heineman, Lowell Calvert, Jules 
Levey and Dennis O'Keefe and Joseph Cotten. 

The delegates attended a special screening 
of David O. Selznick's "Since You Went 
Away" Monday afternoon. 

Tuesday Session Devoted 
To Sales Policies 

The Tuesday session was devoted to sales 
policies on all forthcoming product. 

Among the district managers attending the 
meeting were : Sam Lefkowitz, New York : 
James Winn, Boston; Jack D. Goldhar, De- 
troit ; Fred M. Jack, Dallas ; T. R. Thompson, 
Kansas City ; Rud Lohrenz, Chicago ; W. E. 
Callaway, Los Angeles, and A. J. Jeffrey, 
Toronto. 

The following branch managers attended : 
Jack Ellis, New York; H. G. Bodkin, Phila- 
delphia; Mark Silver, Washington; John Der- 
vin, Boston; M. V. Sullivan, Jr., Buffalo; 
William S. Shartin, New Haven; Harris Du- 
delson, Cincinnati; Morrie Orr, Cleveland; M. 
Dudelson, Detroit; Morton Magill, Pittsburgh; 
C. W. Allen, Atlanta, and Sid Rose, Chicago. 

New Selznick Film to Play 
At 50% Over Scales 

Increased admissions of 50 per cent over regular 
scales at single-featured performances is the policy 
set by United Artists for David O. Selznick's 
"Since You Went Away," Carl Leserman, UA 
general sales manager, announced Tuesday at the 
conclusion of the company's eastern sales meeting 
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. The 
picture opens on Thursday at the Capitol, New 
York. When Mr. Selznick's "Gone With the 
Wind," distributed by MGM, was in release, ad- 
missions were set at a top admission price of 
$1.10. 



IOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY IB, 1944 



23 



Mitchell Leisen's 



Yaramount 



it 



FRENCHMAN'S CREEK 

Fontaine • deCordova 
In* Technicolor 



Preston Storges' 

HAIL THE CONQUERING HER( 

Bracken • Demarest • Logan 
Mark Sandrich's 

"I LOVE A SOLDIER" 

Goddard • Tofts • Fitzgerald 



hat /<ocked 



x>r the past 20 weeks the New York Para- 
lount Theatre has played just two pictures. 

tarting on February 22, Paramount's "Lady 
n The Dark" ran for 10 weeks and broke all 
'ecords in the 18-year history of the house. 

Last Tuesday Paramount's "Going My Way" 
*nded another 10-week run which, in turn, 
shattered the dollar record established by 
'Lady In The Dark." 

"he fact that 10th week business exceeded 
lie 9th week and was more than 80% of open- 
lg week is convincing evidence that this pic- 
are could have run longer if it had not been 
3r previous stage show commitments. 

"his consecutive long-run record is, we be- 
eve, without parallel in New York history for 
ouses of comparable size and policy. 

'et it is just an average sample of the al- 
lost incredible business which this Crosby- 
•IcCarey hit is doing everywhere — 

)n July 4th "Going My Way" played to 
he biggest single day's business under 
traight-picture policy in the history of 
Philadelphia at the Mastbaum. 



In Providence it broke the Strand Theatre 
record the first week — then smashed this 
new record the 2nd week — and the first 
day of the 3rd week topped opening day 
of the engagement. 

At the Stamford Plaza the last day of the 
2-week run was bigger than the opening 
day, forcing a history-making third week. 

It is the first picture ever held for a second 
week at the Warner, Wilmington. 

If these were isolated Paramount hits they 
would in themselves represent a great accom- 
plishment for any single company. 

The fact that they are merely two successes 
in a half-year which has included such high- 
grossing Paramount attractions as "The Story 
of Dr. Wassell," "The Miracle of Morgan's 
Creek," "Standing Room Only," "The Hitler 
Gang," "No Time for Love" and "And The 
Angels Sing" establishes a new industry rec- 
ord for continuity of quality and has created 
the keenest possible interest in these other 
great Paramount attractions which have been 
announced for 1944 release. 



"DOUBLE INDEMNITY" 

Stanwyck • MacMurray • Robinson 

Cecil B. DeMille's 
Modernized Production of 

"SIGN OF THE CROSS" 

Colbert • March • Laughton • Land! 



Preston Sturges' 

"THE GREAT MOMENT" 

McCrea • Field • Demarest 
The Cornelia Otis Skinner- Emily Kimbrough Best Seller 

"OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG AND GAY" 

Russell • Lynn • Ruggles 



RAINBOW ISLAND" 

Lamour • Bracken • Lamb 
In Technicolor 



Frank Borzage s 

"TILL WE MEET AGAIN" 

Milland • Britton • 



Mitchell Leisen's 



PRACTICALLY YOURS" 

Colbert • MacMurray 



Theatre Repair Parts 
Still Months Away 



But None Has Been Forced 
to Close; Many Houses 
Lack Gas for Cooling 

by FRANCIS L BURT 

in Washington 

Hairpins, shoestrings and ingenuity, figura- 
tively, are keeping many film theatres in opera- 
tion today, with no relief in the form of ade- 
quate repair equipment in sight for some 
months to come. 

Without new parts or equipment for more 
than two years, many houses are experiencing 
difficulty in keeping their projection booths at 
an efficient level, and .the situation apparently 
is destined to get worse before it gets better. 

So far as can be learned, however, not a 
single theatre has been forced to close because 
of broken-down equipment, as a result of the 
constant effort of the War Production Board 
theatre equipment section under Allen G. 
Smith to see that every exhibitor facing an 
emergency is taken care of in one way or an- 
other. 

Cooling Systems in Bad Shape 

Thousands of houses, however, are going 
into the summer with badly deteriorated cool- 
ing systems or with no cooling at all, as a re- 
sult of the shortage of Freon gas, and there is 
little likelihood that any of the refrigerent will 
be available for comfort cooling before cold 
weather. 

More than 100 applications for Freon from 
exhibitors whose systems have failed entirely 
have had to be turned down by WPB this sum- 
mer, and while the first units of a new plant 
are expected to go into operation early next 
month the resultant accretion to supply prob- 
ably will not reach the theatres before next 
year. 

The new plant, in East Chicago, will produce 
some 2,000,000 pounds of gas a month, when 
operating at capacity, raising the total output 
to more than 5,000,000 pounds, but little will 
be available within this country until military 
demand for hospital and insecticide require- 
ments, the needs of ships, and the demands of 
civilian hospitals, food plants and war indus- 
tries have been satisfied. 

While the outlook is far from optimistic, a 
successful culmination of the European phase 
of the war might radically change the picture 
as lessened military requirements would permit 
resumption of broader civilian production. 

Projection Equipment First 

Projection equipment and other needs of the 
theatres are scheduled as among the first and 
most necessary products to be released when 
that time comes. At the same time, there is 
considerable doubt whether the attack on Fort- 
ress Europe will reach a victory in the near 
future ; that the Army has its doubts of a short 
campaign is indicated by its current purchases 
of cold-weather clothing for soldiers in Europe. 

While military and Administration leaders 
are none too sanguine over a quick victory 
over Germany, the thoughts of business men 
in this country appear to have jumped all ob- 
stacles to focus on post-war activities, judging 
from the number of inquiries reaching Wash- 
ington regarding after-war possibilities. 

Many of these inquiries appear to contem- 



plate new plants for post-war production, dis- 
tribution, etc., and have centered attention on 
the construction situation which will prevail 
during the transition period. 

There is a strong possibility that the end of 
the war will bring no immediate general aban- 
donment of present controls on prices, produc- 
tion and distribution, because of fears of run- 
away markets and inflation, and the Adminis- 
tration is committed to a general lifting of the 
controls to provide an orderly transition from 
war to peace-time activity. 

This is seen in some quarters as involving a 
control of construction, which might slow down 
any major program for theatre building, it be- 
ing pointed out that more than manpower is 
involved in building and that what goes into a 
new structure is the result of fabrication by 
many plants in many industries on which there 
will be demands from many businesses in ad- 
dition to motion pictures. 

Distribution Control Needed 

Similarly, if all the wraps were taken off 
projector production tomorrow and adequate 
supplies provided of the motors, ball bearings 
and electronic components which are now slow- 
ing up that program, it would probably be 
necessary to control the distribution of the 
finished units so that exhibitors who needed 
•them most could get them first, ahead of those 
whose equipment is still in fair working order 
and those wanting additional apparatus. 

While it is not expected that the flow of new- 
equipment for exhibition will reach any sizable 
volume this year, WPB programs now under 
consideration for 1945 are understood to call 
for marked increases all along the line. Booth 
equipment, seats, carpets and all the other items 
which have been difficult to obtain are to be 
turned out in steadily expanding volume next 
year, if military achievements come up to an- 
ticipations, as there is no doubt they will. 

In the meantime, WPB officials are confident 
they can keep the theatres of the nation run- 
ning, provided the individual exhibitors use 
enough "hairpins, shoestrings and ingenuity." 



20th-Fox to Release Two 
Films During August 

"Take It or Leave It" and "Wing and a Prayer" 
will be released by 20th Century-Fox during 
August, it was announced this week by William 
J. Kupper, general sales manager. 

"Take It or Leave It," a musical based on the 
quiz radio program, was directed by Benjamin 
Stoloff and produced by Bryan Foy, with a cast 
which includes Phil Baker, Majorie Massow, 
Edward Ryan and Stanley Prager. 

"Wing and a Prayer" (The Story of Carrier X), 
was written by Jerome Cady. The cast includes 
Don Ameche, Dana Andrews, William Eythe, 
Charles Bickford, Richard Jaeckel, Kevin O'Shea 
and Henry Morgan. 



Columbia Announces 
Three Promotions 

Columbia announced last week the advancement 
of three persons to more important posts. Mrs. 
Jeanne Dressier McGrann has been named assist- 
ant director of personnel, under the supervision of 
John Kane. George Berman, former assistant to 
Mr. Kane, is now assistant to George Josephs, 
manager of the sales accounting department. Mr. 
Berman replaces Daniel Weisman, who is now 
assistant to Seth Raisler, manager of the contract 
deparfment. 



Army Is Showing 
Troops Overseas 
3 Films Weekly 

Washington Bureau 

The Overseas Motion Picture Branch of ti 
Army Pictorial Service has increased its operatic! 
to astronomical heights in the past year, in t! 
effort to keep men in the field amused, and h 
accomplished its objective of giving troops in ovt 
seas units at least three new films a week. 

To demonstrate what has been accomplishc 
Colonel E. L. Munson, acting chief of the AP 
this week released a few statistics on the secoj 
year's operations of the film branch. 

The number of projectors available to units ovd 
seas has been increased from 421 in March, 194 
to more than 3,200. 

On a single night, the Army shows the late 
films to almost 2,000 field units at stations circlii 
the globe — not including shows seen by o| 
soldiers in civilian theatres nor in Army theatr 
at the larger bases in Panama, Hawaii, Alasl 
Newfoundland, Bermuda or Trinidad. 

As an example of audience strength, the repoJ 
for last March show that in the MediterraneJ 
theatre alone, 14,757 shows were given to a to{ 
audience of 6,215,199. In the same month last ye 
there were only 1,543 shows and an audience 
1,226,103. 

Complaints about Shirley Temple's baby pictur 
and 1900-style Westerns have practically bel 
eliminated — entirely with respect to the 16rn] 
service — and the industry's effort to get more a 
better pictures to the men in uniform than a 
available even to the folks at home is bearing fru 

And to top it all, Col. Munson said, the Arr 
wasn't selfish. Its films in the field are made ava 
able to members of the other branches of the arm 
services, to uniformed personnel of. Allied natioi 
members of the merchant marine and, in isolat 
outposts, to the natives. 



New Clearance Case Filed 
At Milwaukee Tribunal 

A new clearance complaint was filed this we 
at the motion picture arbitration tribunal in M 
waukee. The Range Amusement Company, oper 
tor of the Range theatre at Hurley, Wis., agair 
all five consenting companies, charges that t 
30-day clearance is unreasonable for features play 
at the Ironwood, Rex and Morgan theatres, all 
Ironwood, Mich. The complainant seeks clea 
ances in favor of the Rex or Morgan over t 
Range eliminated and clearance in favor of t 
Ironwood fixed at seven days after the Ironwoc 

The clearance complaint of Sol Winoki 
operator of the Ritz theatre, Watervliet, Mic 
Detroit tribunal's 16th case, against MGM, Wa 
ners, RKO and Paramount, was dismissed la 
Friday by arbitrator John L. Lovett. He rul 
that existing clearance of the Loma and Ha 
theatres, Hartford, Mich., over the Ritz is 
unreasonable. 

All records in the Gary Theatre Compam 
clearance case against the major distributors w 
be submitted to the Arbitration Appeal Board Jr 
26, it was learned this week. At a recent hearii 
in Chicago, arbitrator Benjamin Wham ruled 
favor of the defendants. The plaintiff, operator 
the Place, Gary, Ind., is seeking elimination 
clearance granted the Tivoli, Lido and Lake the 
tres, Valparaiso, Ind., and Palace, Chesterton, Ir 



Harry Cohn Is Columbia's 
Executive Producer 

Harry Cohn, president of Columbia, has a 
sorbed the post of executive producer of the coi 
pany's Hollywood studio. Sidney Buchman, fd 
mer executive producer, will head his own pij 
duction unit, under a recently completed new de' 
whereby he will make two pictures annually. M 
Buchman's first two films will be "Over 2| 
screen version of Ruth Gordon's Broadway H 
and "Jacobowsky and the Colonel," the curre 
Theatre Guild production. 



26 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19 



BOXOFFICE" MAGAZINE says 

Screen Audiences Beg 
For Murder Mysteries! 

w York — Consider the murder mys- stories. It 
rid the horror story — nearly every- ing- 




aramount 

tops 

the Thrills of "The Story of Dr. Wassell" 
the Beauty of "Lady in the Dark" 
the Heart Appeal of "Going My Way" 

the Laughs of "Morgan's Creek" and "Standing Room Only" 
the Novelty of "The Hitler Gang" 
the Rhythm of "And the Angels Sing' 





The Sensational "Liberty" Story of an Unholy Love 
and An Almost Perfect Crime 
Triple-Starring 

FRED BARBARA 

MacMURRAY- STANWYCK 



He Wanted Her! 



She Wanted The $100,000! 



EDWARD G. ROBINSON 

He Got Them Both . . . When They Murdered Her Husband For "Double Indemnity"! 



4nd 



Y, 



u 9h 



/c R 



Off 





"Grade A . . . certain box-office insurance !" — / driety 

Top melodrama of the year! A spellbinder . . . overwhelms with 
sheer power. . . top grosses!" — Hollywood Reporter 

Spellbinding. .. masterful ... cinch strong box office!" — Daily Variety 

"Grade A... One of the best... rings bell as top- 
notch, splendidly acted, brilliantly directed hard- 
bitten melodrama!" — Motion Picture Daily 



"Will have you sitting on edge of seat 
holding your breath . . . should be one 
of top grossers of season!" 

— Showr)ie?i > s Ti'ade Review 



\ 



"Picture making at its best, 
masterful ... should bui 
capacity grosses!" — Boxoffii 



"Prize melodrama of the 
year! Raves definitely 
called for!"— Independent 



with 

PORTER HALL • JEAN HEATHER • BYRON BARR 
RICHARD GAINES • JOHN PHILLIBER 

Directed by BILLY WILDER 

Screen Play by Billy Wilder and Raymond Chandler 



Go Over the Top With Our 
Invasion Troops. Keep 
Fighting With War Bonds! 



U. S. Attempts to Enter Goldman 
Trust Case as "Friend of Court" 



Expect Admission 
Tax Relief Soon 
After War Ends 

asbingtcm Bureau 

Publication this week of the so called "Twin 
C::ies Plan* - for post-war tax reductions, with the 
anpbasis upon the lowering oi individual income 
tates, has centered attention in Washington on the 
SB bject of Federal revenues, but also has brought 
arohasis on the Congressional program to defer 
Consideration of tax legislation until at least the 
European phase of the war has been concluded. 

While the present high admission tax rate of one 
tynt on every five cents of admissions is scheduled 
to return to its former level of one cent on every 
10 six months after the end of the war. there is a 
jerinite possibility that some relief may be granted 
in the first tax bill to be enacted. 

Although few members of Congress are in the 
Caoital at the moment several of those who have 
^got yet returned to their homes made it clear that 
while all suggestions for post-war taxes are wel- 
pomed and will be studied, there is no likelihood 
of any rush action on the subject. 

Congressional and Treasury experts now are 
studying the next tax bill although, so far, they 
fiave not progressed beyond laying down some gen- 
isral principles to be followed. 

T ico Barriers Stand in Way 

Two important barriers stand in the way of im- 
mediate legislation in anticipation of a slackening 
of the war strain on the nation's finances. The first 
s the uncertainty as to how the war will end — 
that is. how much reconversion to peacetime activ- 
ity can be allowed when the Xazis are cleaned up — 
which will depend upon the high command's plan 
tor settling with the Japanese. The other is the 
jr.certainty as to the Treasury's situation when 
±e time comes to consider tax relief, and the 
extent of the relief to be granted will depend both 
jpon the anticipated expenses of the Pacific war 
and the manner in which the public is supporting 
the war effort through Bond purchases. 

It is anticipated, however, that as soon as Ger- 
many caves in and the fighting in Europe stops, 
Congress will consider tax relief, along with re- 
conversion and other phases of the program to 
return the nation gradually to a peacetime economy. 
The extent of the relief to be granted will be de- 
termined only when that time comes. 

The possibility of early admission tax relief is 
based upon an assumption that the change-over 
from war to peace operation, no matter how grad- 
ual and carefully conducted it may be. will involve 
some idleness of labor and reduction of earnings 

Would Keep Income Up 

This would tend both to keep exhibitors' income 
up. with consequent benefit to the Treasury from 
fincome and corporation taxes, and enable the pub- 
lic to continue its most universal form of recreation. 

However, it is emphasized that whatever is said 
now about postwar tax relief is purely speculation 
since, while members of Congress will have definite 
'ideas on the subject and will succeed in putting 
some of them into the legislation, the basic pro- 
gram for the next tax measure will be submitted 
ay the Treasury, whose experts are influenced more 
oy long-term trends than by immediate conditions. 

Hal Home Heads Public 
Information Unit in East 

Hal Home, Twentieth Century-Fox director of 
advertising and publicity, was elected chairman 
of the industry's Public Information Committee, 
eastern section, for the next six months, succeed- 
ing Silas F. Seadler, MGM advertising man- 
ager. Glendon Allvine continues as executive sec- 
retary. At the meeting last week, a plan for fu- 
ture industry public relations work was presented 
by Charles Francis Coe. vice-president of the 
Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, which was taken under advisement by 
the committee. 



The United States Government entered the 
William Goldman $1,650,000 anti-trust suit 
against the Warner theatre circuit and major 
distributors in Philadelphia last Thursday when 
Wendell Berge, Assistant Attorney General, 
filed a petition with the U. S. Circuit Court 
of Appeals to submit a brief as amicus 
cureae, "friend of the court", on the ground 
that the fundamental principle of anti-trust 
law enforcement was involved. 

In the petition, now under advisement by 
Federal Circuit Judges John Biggs, Jr., and 
Gerald McLaughlin, Mr, Berge said: 

"The issues raised herein with respect to 
the application of the Sherman Act to first 
run exhibition of motion pictures in Phila- 
delphia are included in the issues raised in a 
suit brought by the United States against the 
defendants herein under Section 4 of that 
Act, entitled U. S. vs. Paramount Pictures, 
Inc., et al, pending in the District Court of 
the United States for the Southern District of 
New York. The decision of this court herein 
will have an important effect upon the ad- 
ministration of the Sherman Act by the 
United States." 

Home office attorneys were of the opinion 
that the Government's move was merely a 
"routine procedure" and that it had no im- 
portant significance in the eventual disposi- 
tion of the Consent Decree. 

Assistant U. S. Attorney General Tom C. 
Clark indicated in Washington last weekend 
that the filing of the petition would have no 
influence upon the current decree negotia- 



Ginsberg Is General Manager 
For All Paramount Films 

Y. Frank Freeman, vice-president in charge of 
studio operations for Paramount, announced this 
week that effective immediately Henry Ginsberg 
would assume the post of general manager in charge 
of all productions for Paramount Pictures, Inc. 

Mr. Ginsberg assumes the new duties as produc- 
tion chief in addition to his current ones as vice- 
president and general manager of Paramount 
Studios, a post he has filled since February, 1940. 

B. G. De Sylva. who asked to be relieved of his 
duties as executive producer by September 15, 
will remain with Paramount after that date as 
a producer of two or three pictures annually. Be- 
tween now and September 15. Mr. De Sylva will 
continue his duties in connection with all currently 
active productions. 

"Mr. Winkle" Has Premiere 
In Six Post Theatres 

Columbia's Edward G. Robinson film, "Mr. 
Winkle Goes to War,'"' had its world premiere 
Wednesday in the six post theatres of the Aber- 
deen Proving Grounds. Aberdeen, Md. An im- 
portant feature of the presentation was the broad- 
cast from the post of the Dunninger radio pro- 
gram over a 165-station coast-to-coast Blue Net- 
work hookup. 



Robinson in London 

Edward G. Robinson arrived in London last 
week to play the part of a U. S. flying instructor 
in a Royal Air Force feature tentatively entitled 
"Aircrew." A majority of the cast will be per- 
sonnel of the RAF, most of whom were pre-war 
professional players. 



tions and that the petition filed was not a 
formal, legal intervention in the case but was 
designed merely to obtain the court's per- 
mission for the filing of a Government brief 
to enable the Department of Justice to 
acquaint the court with its views on the ques- 
tions at issue. 

Through William A. Gray, attorney, Mr. 
Goldman had appealed from the decision of 
Judge William H. Kirkpatrick of the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court, who dismissed the anti-trust action 
April 8. The plaintiff had charged that the 
defendants, in violation of the Sherman Anti- 
Trust Act, refused to sell him suitable first run 
product for his Erlanger theatre in competi- 
tion with first run theatres operated by the 
Warner circuit in Philadelphia. Judge Kirk- 
patrick held that Mr. Goldman failed to show 
there was restraint of interstate commerce or 
any need for more first run theatres in Phila- 
delphia. He also held that monopoly, if it 
existed, was only local and had no effect on 
interstate trade. 

If there is no objection on the part of 
the Circuit Court of Appeals to the Govern- 
ment's filing of a brief, home office attorneys 
believe they will be given an opportunity to 
submit a brief in reply to any which the 
Department of Justice files with the court. 

Meanwhile, resumption of decree talks 
between Mr. Clark and Joseph Hazen, liaison 
for the industry, await Attorney General 
Biddle's study of the distributors' final decree 
concessions submitted to Mr. Biddle more 
than a week ago. 



New Franchises 
For PRC Units 

A new deal has been negotiated for franchise 
holders of PRC Pictures' 30 exchanges with Nat 
L. Lefton, franchise holder in the Cleveland and 
Cincinnati territories, elected to speak for all other 
owners in future negotiations with the company, 
Motion Picture Daily said Wednesday. 

The new arrangement has resulted in the scrap- 
ping of all previously existing franchise agree- 
ments and the signing of new ones, drastically re- 
vised. All guarantees on pa3*ment for product, 
past, present and future, have been eliminated and 
all of PRC's claims against the franchise holders 
have been discharged. A reduction in distribution 
charges for all exchanges is included. 

A franchise holder's committee has been organ- 
ized, including Henri Ellman of Chicago, George 
Fill, Washington, D. C. Ike Katz, Atlanta, and 
Mr. Lefton. In the future, the holders will be 
permitted, under certain circumstances, to supple- 
ment PRCs product for their respective exchanges 
with pictures from other companies if PRC fails 
to deliver satisfactorily. A system of quotas, 
based on 75 per cent of the cost has been insti- 
tuted, replacing the old system of guarantees 
which were based on 100 per cent of the negative 
cost of pictures produced. 

About 10 other changes on minor points were 
said to have been incorporated in the new- deal 
which was worked out by the holders at a meeting 
in New York recently with Kenneth M. and John 
S. Young, principal owners of PRC, their legal 
representatives. Leon Fromkess. vice-president "in 
charge of PRC production and Bertram Mayers, 
representing the holders. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



31 



"to inspire,. .to thrill. ..to give heart..." 



"THE LIBERATION OF ROME" available free to all 
theatres is an exciting tworeel pictorial record of a march 
that made history. Brave cameramen of the U. S. Army 
Pictorial Service made it in collaboration with British 
Service Film units. They have captured the heart-beat 
of heroes lifting an enslaved people into the sunlight of 
freedom. Play it and win the thanks of your patrons! 
Film Daily expressing the enthusiasm of the trade press 
says : "of enormous interest, thrilling to witness, a MUST 
for all theatres." 

"THE LIBERATION OF ROME" IS FREE! BOOK IT NOW! 

Distributed thru M-G-M Exchanges. Accessories from National Screen Service. 
Sponsored by War Activities Committee — Motion Picture Industry 



LET YOUR CONSCIENCE 
BE YOUR GUIDE! 

Are you one of the thousands of loyal 
American showmen who has given your 
country a Free Movie Day or a Bond 
Premiere? To you the heartfelt thanks of 
a nation at war! 

If you have not yet had a Free Movie Day or a Bond Premiere, it is not 
too late to do the right thing! The sale of "E" Bonds will meet the ex- 
pectations of our fighting forces only if every theatre does its share. Act 
today without delay! They die for you. Do not fail them. 

KEEP SELLING 
"E" BONDS 

Sponsored by War Activities Committee of Motion 
Picture Industry, 150 1 Broadway, N. Y. C. 




"BE GLAD YOU'RE ALIVE 
TO BACK NUMBER 5" 





Watch for it! Have your 
Bond Sales Figures 
ready to report! 



Labor Cost and Cross 
British Quota Problem 



Difficulty Stems from War 
Situation; Trade Board 
Studies Remedies 

by PETER BURNUP 

in London 

Odd difficulties emerged recently in the tan- 
gled Quota situation during discussions with 
Board of Trade officials. They concerned two 
things : 

Monetary payments for labor falling outside 
the Quota year ; and 

Receipts for British films in America that 
were earned in addition to any lump-sum pay- 
ment. 

Both circumstances are of 'considerable im- 
portance to American distributors trading in 
this country. 

Under the 1938 Act of Parliament and its 
subsequent amendments, the Quota obligations 
of foreign — i. e. American — renters are related 
both to the amount paid for British labor in 
the production of a given film, and to the 
amount of any receipts which may accrue from 
its showing in the States. 

No Difficulties Foreseen 

When the Act was drafted no difficulty was 
foreseen in its operation in either of these re- 
gards. But very real difficulties have devel- 
oped. Highly regarded technicians and actors 
lately have demanded not a flat salary for their 
services but a share in a film's ultimate profits. 
They seek to cash in on the current boom in 
British production; want, not unnaturally, to 
enhance their own stake in any production of 
promise. 

But a film's final takings may not be ascer- 
tained until well after the year of its making. 
How then, American renters are asking, can 
the full labor costs be registered with the 
Board of Trade in that particular year? For 
that is the requirement of the law as it stands. 

Similarly, in the event of a film being sold 
to America for a flat rate plus a percentage of 
any receipts over that sum, the total profit ac- 
cruing to the British producer is not ascertain- 
able until the conclusion of the picture's run. 
It follows that this sum, too, cannot be re- 
corded in the year of making. 

Unwilling to Amend Act 

Neither circumstance was envisaged at the 
time of the Act's drafting; both have arisen 
through wartime prosperity. 

The Board of Trade is unwilling to embark 
on any comprehensive amendment to the Act 
which expires, in any event, in 1948. But dis- 
tributors insist that they are having an unfair 
deal as things are. 

Hugh Gaitskill and the other motion picture 
experts on the Board's establishment are hav- 
ing a busy time seeking a way out of the im- 
passe. 

V 

There's a race on at Denham, it seems, be- 
tween Sir Alexander Korda and Gabriel Pas- 
cal as to which of the two producers shall pro- 
cure the greater degree of official cooperation 
in his current endeavor. 

Sir Alexander's MGM piece, "Perfect 
Strangers," concerns itself with a naval occa- 
sion. It tells of a meek little City clerk — Rob- 
ert Donat — and his timid wife — Deborah Kerr 

34 



— who leave their drab wedded life for adven- 
ture in the Royal Navy ; he as an ordinary sea- 
man, she into the WRNS, the woman's branch 
of Britain's sea service. Both, so the story 
runs, are mentally reborn in the process ; dread 
returning, after a service separation of three 
years, to what they imagine must still be a 
dreary partnership. 

Navy Gave Every Aid 

Sir Alexander went, months ago, to the Ad- 
miralty, besought the Navy's help in giving 
his picture a proper verisimilitude. Help has 
been forthcoming in brimming measure. The 
Admiralty gave Korda's location unit the free- 
dom of a certain establishment down in East 
Anglia where embryo sailors are put through 
their preliminary paces. They even ordained 
that the Station's Commanding Officer should 
figure in one scene of a vast parade of all 
hands. The unit moves up to Scotland now to 
get its background for the picture of young 
women graining. 

But Mr. Pascal goes further than that. He 
has coopted no less a force than the U. S. 
Army to the making of his ancient tale of 
Egyptian love, "Caesar and Cleopatra." Pre- 
viously reported from here was the difficulty of 
finding a spot resembling Egypt's authentic 
sands, journey to the Nile manifestly being im- 
possible these days. Most sandy beaches in 
Britain are now under military control but, by 
special authority, Mr. Pascal took his principal 
actors and aides to a certain classic spot on the 
coast where Americans are in command. ' 

Permission to operate there was solicited 
humbly; and permission from the very highest 
quarters was immediately forthcoming. What 
is more, authority said that it might amuse the 
soldiery, standing by for embarkation else- 
where, to lend a hand. The G. I.'s looked for- 
ward eagerly to the prospect. There was talk 
even of lending a landing craft to be built up 
into the shape of Caesar's barge. 

Balcon Buys D-Day Script 

Michael Balcon goes on with his adventur- 
ing. One of the B. B. C.'s brighter efforts at 
dramatization of the war was a recapitulation 
in sound of the vivid 12 hours' happenings 
when Britain's railways set about the job of 
moving General Eisenhower's giant force on 
the eve of D-Day. The performance on the air 
thrilled the whole country. Mr. Balcon imme- 
diately bought the screen rights to the piece — 
it is called "Junction X," and plans to put it 
into production forthwith. 

George Formby has finished his latest frolic 
under Marcel Varnel's direction. The film — 
it has been once more renamed "He Snoops to 
Conquer" — is concerned with the small time 
racketeers of a little country town. Connois- 
seurs of the Formby humor declare that it will 
transcend all former Formbys. 

Mr. Formby and his wife are now standing 
by awaiting a summons to those Normandy 
beaches where the troops eagerly ask for him. 
There's no more loved performer among Brit- 
ish soldiers than George Formby. 



Griffith Heads Council 

L. C. Griffith, chief barker of Oklahoma Variety 
Club, has resigned that office in order to accept 
the post of chairman of the War Council of the 
State of Oklahoma. Ralph Talbot was elected 
to take Mr. Griffith's place. 



Seidelman Urges 
Companies Dub \ 
For Latin America 

Dubbing of pictures for Latin America in Spai ! 
ish can only be successful if all companies do ii, 
Samuel Seidelman, United Artists supervisor f( j| 
that territory, said last Thursday upon his retui; 
to New York, after four years at his Buenos Air-I 
headquarters. 

Latin American patrons prefer subtitles to dul 
bing ; but if all companies dub, the patrons wi ■ j 
accept the mode, and will become accustomed 1 
it, he thinks. He added that upper class Latii , 
scoff at dubbing. 

Of the situation in Argentina, Mr. Seidelmj ! 
reported only a continuing impasse between e: 
hibitors and producers, the latter asking a thiill: 
of first run and 50 per cent of other playing tirrl 
and percentage. He also noted that produces 
were facing increased shortage of raw stock. 

Although native product gains favor, the AJ 
gentine upper classes still prefer American pil 
tures, he said. It is in the subsequent runs th; 
Argentine films score. 

Mr. Seidelman, on his way north, stopped 
Bogota, Colombia, to supervise reconditioning 
the newly purchased Astral theatre, which open< 
June 6 with "Jack London." 

He will return to Buenos Aires in about 
month, after visiting the Coast and Mexico. 



2 Pension Plans 
Sent to Treasury I 

Early this week RKO Radio announced it hzll 
filed its pension plan for official U. S. Treasui|t 
Department approval, and Loew's, last week afl 
nounced that Equitable Life Assurance Comparjji 
had outbid other insurance companies for the undell 
writing of its pension plan. 

RKO submitted its pension plan to the Treasufk 
first late last year, when the Treasury indicat<|( 
it would receive official approval. The comparlj 
put the plan into effect for all its employees wiM 
the exception of production talent such as pr jl 
ducers, directors, writers, players, seasonal ai|I 
part-time employees. The plan went into effect tfl 
first of this year with credits accruing since they 

Loew's also submitted details of its pension plan 
to the Treasury and received unofficial approval 
The plan covers all employees, including producticH 
personnel. It will be submitted to the stockholdeH 
next Tuesday for their approval. 

As in the case of RKO, should the stockholdeH 
approve, final official approval would have to B 
obtained from the Treasury by Loew's. It is sal 
that the plan will cost the company approximate 
$3,500,000 the first year, starting March 1, 19* 
and for each vear thereafter the cost would cor 
Xo about $3,000,000. 

"Dragon Seed" to Open at 
Music Hall July 20 

The world premiere of MGM's "Dragon See 
starring Katherine Hepburn, will take place 
Radio City Music Hall July 20, following a thre 
week run of Columbia's "Once Upon a Time; 
Featured with Miss Hepburn in the picturizatii 
of Pearl S. Buck's novel, which was produced 1 
Pandro S. Berman and directed by Jack Conw; 
and Harold S. Bucquet, are Walter Huston, All 
MacMahon and Akim Tamiroff. 

ODT Asks Cancellation 
Of All Trade Meetings 

J. M. Johnson, transportation director of t 
Office of Defense Transportation, in a letter sent 
executives of all trade associations, has ask 
the abandonment of all trade conventions and me' 
ings for at least the remainder of this year becai 
of the burden imposed upon the railroads by t 
invasion of Western Europe. 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, IS 




CHESTER MORRIS 



RUTH WARRICK • BARTON MacLANE - TOM TULLY - WALLACE FORD 

Screen Play by ROY CHANSLOR • Based upon a Saturday Evening Post story and best-selling novel by JOHN HAWKINS and WARD HAWKINS 

Produced by phil l. ryan for terneen productions • Directed by EDDIE SUTHERLAND - a Columbia picture 



Another great MR. is added 

to ~" 
Columbia's 

Hall of 

Memorabl 

Motion 

Picture 

Characters! * 






As Mr. Winkle goes. so goes your heart ... laughing, 
loving, deeply sympathizing ... as you follow the most 
lovable character ever to come out of a bestseller! 



EDWARD G. ROBINSON 



in Columbia Pictures' 



/Mr. Winkle Goes to War 

with RUTH WARRICK TED DONALDSON • BOB HAYMES 

Screen Play by Waldo Salt, George Corey, Louis Solomon • From the best-selling novel 
by THEODORE PRATT • Produced by JACK MOSS • Directed by ALFRED E. GREEN 




*m JEFF DONNELL • iSH KABIBBLE • GEORGIA CARROLL 
HARRY BABBITT • SULLY MASON • DIANE PENDLETON 

and KAY KYSER'S BAND 

Screen play by Joseph Hoffman and Al Martin • Produced by SAMUEL BISCHOFF • Directed by LEIGH JASON 



v «M 



THE HOLLYWOOD SCENE 



ompleted 

DLUMBIA 

rcas Rifles 

Ism 

Jhirty Seconds Over 
Tokyo 

ONOGRAM 

!he Utah Kid 

(formerly "Trigger 

Law") 
.hadows of Suspicion 

(formerly "Baby 

Shoes") 

^RAMOUNT 

'ouble Exposure 
(Pine-Thomas) 

KO RADIO 

he Girl Rush 



My Pal Wolf 
Farewell, My Lovely 
Having Wonderful 

Crime 
REPUBLIC 

Firebrands of Arizona 
Man of Mystery 
Atlantic City 
UNIVERSAL 
The Frozen Ghost 
The Old Texas Trail 
My Baby Loves Music 
Bowery to Broadway 
WARNERS 
Strangers in Our 
Midst 

Started 

MONOGRAM 

Little Devils 



RKO RADIO 

Nevada 
REPUBLIC 

Flame of Barbary 

Coast 
Vigilantes of Dodge 

City 

20TH CENTURY- FOX 

Sunday Dinner for a 
Soldier 

UNIVERSAL 

Stars Over Manhattan 

Shooting 

COLUMBIA 

Sergeant Mike 
Stalk the Hunter 
Tonight and Every 
Night 



The Unwritten Code 
(formerly "The 
Unknown") 

MGM 

Home Front 
Anchors Aweigh 
Airship Squadron 4 
Music for Millions 
Son of Lassie 
Thin Man Goes Home 
Ziegfeld Follies 
Picture of Dorian Gray 

PRC 

When the Lights Go on 
Again 

PARAMOUNT 

Kitty 

Out of This World 
A Medal for Benny 



Her Heart in Her 

Throat 
Here Comes the Waves 
Murder, He Says 
Two Years Before the 

Mast 

RKO RADIO 

The Brighton Strangler 
REPUBLIC 

My Buddy 

20TH CENTURY- FOX 

Thunderhead 

A Tree Grows in 

Brooklyn 
Winged Victory 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Dark Waters 
(Bogeaus) 



Tomorrow the Worlc 

(Cowan) 
Story of G.I. Joe 

(Cowan) 
The Great John L 

(Crosby) 
Three's a Family 

(Lesser) 

UNIVERSAL 

Can't Help Singing- 
Queen of the Nile 
In Society 

WARNERS 

The Corn Is Green 
Christmas in 

Connecticut 
Roughly Speaking 
Objective Burma 
Hollywood Canteen 



PRODUCTION AT THREE-MONTH 
-OW WITH 44 IN WORK 



lolly wood Bureati 

July, notoriously a slow month around the 
:udios,, lived up to expectations last week as 
le total number of pictures in work tumbled 
) 44. This is the lowest figure since the first 
eek in April, when the total stood at 43. Dur- 
lg the past week, 17 features were completed, 
nd six new ones were started. 

The standout among the starters is Twenti- 
th Century-Fox's "Sunday Dinner for a Sol- 
ier," which Lloyd Bacon is directing for 
Valter Morosco, producer. It's the story of a 
imily of Florida "crackers" who, prevented 
y poverty from doing anything more sub- 
tantial to aid the war effort, invite a soldier to 
inner. The cast includes Anne Baxter, John 
lodiak, Charles Winninger, Bobby Driscoll, 
mne Revere, Chill Wills and Robert Baily. 

"Little Devils," one of Monogram's high- 
udget features scheduled for the 1944-45 sea- 
on, went before the cameras with Monte Bell 
irecting for Producer Grant Withers. The 
tory explores a new field, presenting the ex- 
ploits of young Chinese guerrilla warriors. 
Vmong those in the cast are Harry Carey, 
5 aul Kelly, Ducky Louis, Jimmy Dodd, Ralph 
^ewis, Gloria Ann Chew, Fred Mah, Hay- 
vard Son Hoo and Philip Ahn. 

r wo New Pictures Are 
Started at Republic 

Republic trained cameras on two : "Flame 
>f Barbary Coast," with Joseph Kane as pro- 
lucer-director, and John Wayne, Ann Dvorak 
.nd Joseph Schildkraut in principal parts ; and 
Vigilantes of Dodge City," with Wild Bill El- 
iott, Bobby Blake and Alice Fleming. It's an- 
■»ther of the "Red Ryder" series, and Stephen 
\uer is associate producer. Wallace Grissell 
lirector. 

Universal launched "Stars over Manhattan," 
. musical with the Andrews Sisters, Martha 
D'Driscoll, Noah Beery, Jr., George Barbier 
nd Marie Harmon. Edward Lilley directs for 
Associate Producer Warren Wilson. 

RKO Radio's new film for the week is "Ne- 
■ada," a western, whose cast includes Robert 
vTitc-hum, Nancy Gates, Anne Jeffreys, Rich- 
•rd Martin, Gui'nn "Big Boy" Williams, Craig 



Reynolds and Emmett Lynn. Herman Schlom 
is the associate producer, Max Nosseck the di- 
rector. 

V 

Almost every type of entertainment is in- 
cluded in Paramount's product for next season, 
according to the studio's master schedule. Mu- 
sicals lead the list. Eight of these are sched- 
uled for early release, among them "Rainbow 
Island," starring Dorothy Lamour and Eddie 
Bracken ; Pine and Thomas' "Take It Big," 
with Jack Haley; "Incendiary Blonde," star- 
ring Betty Hutton and Arturo de Cordoba ; 
"Road to Utopia," which reunites Bing Cros- 
by, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour ; "Na- 
tional Barn Dance," "Bring on the Girls," 
"Here Come the Waves" and "Out of This 
World." 

Seven Comedies on List of 
Paramount Pictures 

There are seven comedies on the list. Pres- 
ton Sturges' "Hail the Conquering Hero" 
heads the last block for the current season. 
For future release are "Our Hearts Were 
Young and Gay," "Practically Yours," co-star- 
ring Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray, 
and the last two in the Aldrich Family series. 
Currently in work are "A Medal for Benny" 
and "Murder, He Says." 

Six more serious dramas include Mark 
Sandrich's "I Love a Soldier," "The Great 
Moment," "Till We Meet Again," starring 
Ray Milland and Barbara Britton, "The Man 
in Half-Moon Street," "And Now Tomorrow," 
starring Loretta Young, Alan Ladd and Susan 
Hayward. Currently in work is "Two Years 
Before the Mast," starring Alan Ladd, Brian 
Donlevy, William Bendix, Esther Fernandez. 

Historical Romance Soon 
To Be Released 

Soon to be released is a historical romance, 
"Frenchman's Creek," Technicolor production 
starring Joan Fontaine and Arturo de Cordo- 
ba. In production is "Kitty," a story of Lon- 
don in 1780, starring Paulette Goddard and 
Ray Milland. 

Two mvsteries are on the list. "Double In- 



demnity" is completed and awaiting release, 
and "Her Heart in Her Throat" is still in 
work. Four action pictures produced by Pine 
and Thomas are also scheduled: "Gambler's 
Choice," "Dark Mountain," "One Body Too 
Many" and "Double Exposure." 

Sam Wood Explains 
Change of Plan 

Some time ago, according to a statement by 
the producer, Sam Wood and Gary Cooper, 
agreed on the filming of "Jubal Troop," as an 
independent production for release by Colum- 
bia, and a corporation was set up on the basis 
of this agreement. Later, Cooper signed a pro- 
duction deal with International Pictures, pre- 
sumably to take effect after completion of the 
Sam Wood production. An offer was then 
made to the producer to make "Jubal Troop" 
under International's auspices, giving Colum- 
bia the release on a percentage basis. Since 
he did not want to breach his commitment for 
this and three other pictures he is preparing 
for Columbia, Wood turned the offer down. 
It was then that the Wood-Cooper deal was 
dissolved, and the actor took up his Interna- 
tional contract. The dissolution was an 
amicable one, and agreed upon entirely for 
business reasons. 

V 

Hollywood Boulevard will be photographed 
in Technicolor for the first time in MGM's 
"Anchors Aweigh," the musical which George 
Sidney is directing for Joe Pasternak, with 
Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Kathryn Grayson 
and Jose Iturbi in principal parts. Cameras 
are being mounted on the rooftops of buildings 
along the thoroughfare for scenes taking in the 
length of the boulevard's main section. Smaller 
portions of the street are being reproduced. 

Personnel Intelligence 
About Hollywood 

Helmut Dantine's contract has been renewed 
by Warners. . . . Hugo Haas, Czechslovakian 
actor, will be seen for the first time on the 
American screen in Columbia's "Stalk the 
Hunter." . . . Hume Cronyn has been assigned 
a top spot in the forthcoming MGM musical, 
"Yolanda and the Thief," which will co-star 
Fred Astaire and Lucille Ball. . . . Howard 
Welch has been added to the roster of produc- 
tion executives at Universal. . . . "The Case of 
the Missing Medico" has been set as the title 
of the first in the Monogram series with Cisco 
Kid, famed O'Henry character. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15. 1944 



39 



Adolph Zukor Remembers Whet 
He Made Pictures Talk in 1905 



Crowds Block the Street in 
Front of Keith & Proctor's 
Zukor's Humanovo Co., the 
Attraction. 







NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 1st, 1908. 



NEARLY A RIOT ! 

Enormous Crowds Push and Jostle 
Each Other Trying to Buy Tickets 
to the 23rd Street Theatre. 

POLICE GALLED TO MAINTAIN ORDER. 



WheQ the Keith and Proctor jx-opt«\ j l>»tk of the manofaclurer i>f (ho film* 

abandoned Vaudeville in ihe 2.1r<» St j f ? ,h * [ ' r, " M ' r t ' r " ,|li,:lu 1 l " " u 

. ih« part of the pfrt'otru-r* *-niii^A..| 

Theatre and announced tiwi hence- iref(>nuQftWly wSIh !h( , ra[>ili K ,. owlQ 
forth the theatre, would be devoted tof^ t b*; ....business 'his .careful EhonvM 



ZUKOR'SJUMANOVO 

Pictures That Talk, Sln$ 
and Dance. 



Many novelties hav<j been Introduc- 
ed In the theatrical field of late years 
some lavolvins the Investment of 
whole fortune*, but not In years haa 
anything been Introduced which has 
caught the public fancy, and met 
with sur-h a hearty response a* Zu- 
kor's Hi 
Movir. 



pic 



ha 



" oeert seen, 
fill this enter. 
] In the Beld 



NOON EDITION 



12 PACES 



PRICE OWE CENT. 



CITY NEWS 



COMING ! 

Direct From New York Thm 
Humanovo. 

The busings manager ot Zufcor'3 
Humanovo Amusement fo. arrived tii 
the city ye<aenlay and arranned for 
thf rtppeantn<-'<( of hln attraetion ai 
tb<* tn.-j%l IhesJrc C.-our into.-a.at.lj 



ZUKOR'5 Humanovo caused crowds in New York engagements, brought a need for police to 
handle them, and this popularity, even as now, was used to arouse interest in the process 
when exhibited elsewhere. Above, part of a display board used then in theatre lobbies. 



by FLOYD E. STONE 

IT was a "tremendous commotion from ocean 
to ocean." 

That is the summation, and that was the slo- 
gan, of the "Humanovo," a system of talking- 
pictures long antedating those of today. 

Adolph Zukor, chairman of the board of Par- 
amount, entrepreneur of entertainment, was the 
originator of the "Humanovo." The idea was 
simple : people talked as a picture played ; with 
enough rehearsal and by careful editing and 
creation of dialogue, they matched lip move- 
ments of the characters in the pictures, even 
though the pictures were produced without 
thought to such synchronization. 

Back in 1905, Mr. Zukor, making one of his 
regular trips to Europe, visited Charles Pathe, 
in Paris. There, they talked of matters close 
to both : entertainment, possibilities of the new 
medium, the motion picture. 

Adapted French Method 
To Develop Humanovo 

Mr. Pathe showed Mr. Zukor the French 
penny arcade for records. The patron inserted 
a coin, employees on the floor below received it 
and played records. In America, the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville Company used the same idea, 
but a machine received the coin, played the rec- 
ord, and brought the needle back to starting 
point. 

The French idea was called the Humanovox. 
Mr. Zukor, hearing the records, thought little 
of them because they squeaked and had insuffi- 
cient volume. But when he returned to Amer- 
ica he thought of having humans speak while 
films played; and he named his idea Humanovo. 

Mr. Zukor hired actors, rehearsed them, and 
then in his theatre, on the site at Union 
Square, now occupied by Klein's store, he 
showed his talking pictures to Keith and Proc- 
tor, merchants of vaudeville. Mr. Keith's vau- 
deville house abutted Mr. Zukor's film house. 
Mr. Keith slipped around the corner, and was 
impressed. 

Units Traveled the Country 
And Were Successful 

He booked Mr. Zukor's troupe into his cir- 
cuit. 

Then began the short epoch of the Human- 
ovo. Mr. Zukor's actors, carrying their film 
under their arms, traveled over the country, 
scoring successes, receiving higher salaries, be- 
coming more skilled, and convincing Mr. Zukor 
the chances of making money were indeed good. 

Mr. Zukor increased the number of troupes ; 
there developed approximately 12, of approxi- 
mately five persons each, and each accompanied 
by a manager responsible to Mr. Zukor. In the 
big vaudeville houses, a company played a 
week; in the smaller, twice a week. Mr. Zukor 
charged the theatre $500 or more for use of 
each unit ; he remembers now that each unit 
probably netted him $100 per week. 

The Humanovo units, trained by Mr. Zukor 
and Will H. Stevens, in a studio at 26th Street 
and Seventh Avenue, New York, were never 
sent out until their effect was such that the 
reputation of the system would not suffer news- 
paper criticism, or harsh laughter from audi- 
ences. 

An important appurtenance to their perform- 



ance was the erection over each screen in back 
of which they played, of a water pipe, drilled 
with small holes, from which dripped enough 
water to keep the screen in a state of trans- 
lucence. Mr. Zukor, interviewed at this day 
on the subject, cannot say why the present ap- 
plication of the so-called "Translux" screen did 
not occur to him then. 

In any event, he does remember that the 
vocal effort necessary to project the voices 
through the screen onto the audience was so 
much that to him it precluded for all time the 
possibility of using the phonograph as devel- 
oped then. 

Several years later, when Thomas A. Edison, 
picture pioneer, attempted to be a pioneer of 
talking pictures, Mr. Zukor, knowing inwardly 
the idea was no good, went to the demonstra- 
tion at, he recalls, the Palace theatre, and, de- 
spite the tremendous publicity, knew he was 
right. 

Two Factors Responsible for 
Abandonment of Humanovo 

The Edison attempt was made in the eclipse 
of the Humanovo system. That eclipse is ex- 
plained by Mr. Zukor in two parts. One, he 
joined the new Loew circuit in 1909, as treas- 
urer. That became his direction. Two, he 
saw pictures becoming longer, and the expense 
of Humanovo companies heavier. He had not 
patented the idea ; so the companies persisted ; 
but they dropped out because of the expense 
and the corollary impossibility of preparing 
actors, and fitting dialogue as in the days of 
short subjects. 

He used actors of little consequence, Mr. 
Zukor recalls, "and they would have objected 
to our using their names ; they worked for us 
just because they needed the money." 

He obtained pictures without trouble, he also 
recalls. The producers were "tickled pink" 
and "relied on our accounting alone." 




ADOLPH ZUKOR, chairman of the Paramour: 
Board of directors, as he appears today. 



"In a way," he said, "they practically loanefj 
us our pictures. Our arrangement with Perc I 
Waters, of the Edison Company, was that wj 
paid him regularly for each day's use of 
picture. 

"Speaking of the actors we used, and thai 
they were of little consequence, there was on 
exception, who later became a 'name': Lowe! 
Sherman, whom you remember. Our reasorj 
frankly, for not using noted actors, was thai 
they cost money." 

Despite the fact that his Humanovo has bee 
superseded by present talking pictures. Mi 
Zukor sees in television Humanovo's resur 
gence. Says he of television: "it is, after all 
actors talking as you listen, from behind 
screen." 



+0 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY IS, 



194 



M-G-M TRADE SHOWINGS 



DAY, DATE AND HOURS OF SCREENING 





CITY 


PLACE 
ADDRESS 


THE SEVENTH CROSS 


DRAGON SEED 


BARBARY 


COAST GENT 


ALBANY 


20'h-Fox Screen Room 
1052 Broadway 


WED. 


7/19 


8 P.M 


FRI. 7/21 


8 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


8 


P.M. 


ATLANTA 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
197 Walton St., N.W. 


WED. 


7/19 


10:30 A. M. 


FRI. 7/28 


70:30 


A.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


70.30 


A.M. 


30ST0N 


M-G-M Screen Room 
46 Church Street 


WED. 


7/19 


10 A.M. 

Also: 2:15 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


10 

Also: 2:15 


A.M. 
P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


70 A,M- 
Also: 2:15 P.M. 


BUFFALO 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
290 Franklin Street 


WED. 


7/19 


8 P.M. 


FRI 7/91 


a 
o 


P M 

r . /VI. 


TIIF^ 

1 ULO. 


8/1 
°/ 1 


8 


P.M. 


CHARLOTTE 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
308 South Church Street 


WED. 


7/19 


1:30 P.M. 


FRI 7/98 
rl\li / / £ o 




P M 


TUF^ 


8/1 


1:30 


P.M. 


CHICAGO 


H. C. Igel's Screen Room 
1301 South Wabash Ave. 


WED. 


7/19 
1 7 


1 P.M. 


THUR 7/90 


7 

1 


P M 

r . /vi. 


TUF^ 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


CINCINNATI 


RKO Screen Room 
16 East Sixth Street 


WED. 


7/19 
' / 1 7 


7 P.M. 


THUR 7/90 


7 


P.M. 


TIIFS 

1 UtJ. 


8/1 
°/ 1 


7 


P.M. 


CLEVELAND 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
2219 Payne Avenue 


WED. 


7/19 
'/" 


1 P.M. 


THUR 7/20 

1 1 IUi\, / J £-\J 


j 


P.M. 


TUES 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


DALLAS 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
1803 Wood Street 


WED. 


7/19 
' / 1 7 


' 2:30 P.M. 


FRI 7/28 


2:30 


P.M. 


TUES 

1 UL J. 


8/1 
°/ 1 


2:30 


P.M. 


DENVER 


Paramount Screen Room 
2100 Stout Street 


WED. 


7/19 


2 P.M. 


FRI. 7/28 


2 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


2 


P.M. 


DES MOINES 


201h-Fox Screen Room 
1300 High Street 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


FRI 7/91 


j 


P.M. 


Tl IFS 

1 ULJ, 


8/1 


I 


P.M. 


DETROIT 


Max Blumenthal's Sc. Rm. 
2310 Cass Avenue 


WED. 


7/19 


1:30 P.M. 


THUR 7/90 


7:30 


P.M. 


Tl IPC 


8/1 


7.30 


P.M. 


INDIANAPOLIS 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
326 No. Illinois Street 


WED. 


7/19 
' / 1 7 


10:30 A.M. 


FRI. 7/21 


70:30 


A.M. 


TIIFS 

IULJ. 


8/1 

Of 1 


70.30 


A.M. 


KANSAS CITY 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
1720 Wyandotte St. 


WED. 


7/19 
'/" 


1 P.M. 


THUR 7/90 


j 


P.M. 


Tl IFS 


8/1 


7 


P.M. 


LOS ANGELES 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
2019 South Vermont Ave. 


WED. 


7/19 


2:30 P.M. 


THUR 7/20 

III \J Wt f 1 


2.30 


P.M. 


TUES 


8/1 


2:30 


P.M. 


MEMPHIS 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
1 51 Vance Avenue 


WED. 


/19 


1 P.M. 


FRI. 7/21 


J 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 

Of 1 


I 


P.M. 


MILWAUKEE 


Warner Screen Room 
212 W. Wisconsin Ave. 


WED. 


7/19 


1:30 P.M. 


FRI. 7/21 


1:30 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


7.-30 


P AA 


MINNEAPOLIS 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
1015 Currie Avenue 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


I 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


J 


P.M. 


NEW HAVEN 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
40 Whiting Street 


WED. 


7/19 


10:30 A.M. 


FRI. 7/28 


70:30 


A.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


JO 10 


A.M. 


NEW ORLEANS 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
200 South Liberty 


WED. 


7/19 


2:30 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


7 30 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 




P AA 

r ./VI. 


NEW YORK 
NEW JERSEY \ 


M-G-M Screen Room 
630 Ninth Avenue 


TUES. 


7/18 


10:30 A.M. 

Also: 2:30 P.M. 


Previously Trade shown 




TUES. 


8/1 


Also: 2:30 


A AA 

M./Vl. 

P.M. 


OKLA'MA CITY 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
10 North Lee Street 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


FRI. 7/28 


7 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


OMAHA 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
1502 Davenport 


WED. 


7/19 


1:30 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


7:30 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1:30 


P.M. 


PHILADELPHIA 


M-G-M Screen Room 
1233 Summer Street 


WED. 


7/19 


11 A.M. 
Also: 2 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


77 

Also: 2 


A.M. 
P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


11 

Also: 2 


A.M. 
P.M. 


PITTSBURGH 


M-G-M Screen Room 
1623 Blvd. of Allies 


w cu. 


7/10 

//iy 


9 P AA 
z r ./VI. 


FRI. 7/21 


2 


P M 


Tl IFS 

1 ULJ. 


8 /l 
0/ 1 


2 


P.M. 




B. F. Shearer Screen Room 
1947 N.W. Kearney St. 


W CU. 


//iy 


I piyl 
/ r ./VI. 


FRI. 7/28 


1 


r . /vi. 


Tl IFC 

1 Ulj. 


Of 1 


1 


P.M. 


ST. LOUIS 


S'Renco Screen Room 
3143 Olive Street 


WED. 


7/19 


2:30 P.M. 


FRI. 7/21 


2:30 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


SALT LAKE CITY 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
216 East First Street, So. 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


FRI. 7/28 


1 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


S. FRANCISCO 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
245 Hyde Street 


WED. 


7p9 


1:30 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


1:30 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1:30 


P.M. 


SEATTLE 


Jewel Box Preview Theatre 
2318 Second Ave. 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


FRI. 7/28 


1 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


1 


P.M. 


WASHINGTON 


20th-Fox Screen Room 
932 New Jersey, N.W. 


WED. 


7/19 


1 P.M. 


THUR. 7/20 


1 


P.M. 


TUES. 


8/1 


I 


P.M. 



"The Seventh Cross" — Spencer Tracy • "Dragon Seed" — Katharine Hepburn • "Barbary Coast Gent" — Wallace Beery 



Mclntyre Warns 
Australia May Set 
Duty on U.S. Films 

Legislation advocating an ad valorem duty on 
American films may have to be fought by American 
film company representatives in Australia soon. 
Here C. Mclntyre, Universal's Australian manag- 
ing director, told the trade press at the home office 
Tuesday. Mr. Mclntyre is in the United States on 
his first visit in seven years. Telling of extraordi- 
narily good business, he also warned that the Aus- 
tralian Government was worried over the incomes 
gained by industry personnel in general and by first 
run exhibitors specifically. 

The American companies now pay a raw stock 
and a footage duty, he pointed out, and said that 
the proposed ad valorem duty might be obviated 
if the American representatives "unite and clearly 
define to these government fellows why it should 
not be applied." 

"They should be told," he said, "that in the film 
industry if you put $5,000,000 or $4,000,000 into 
a picture, you expect to get more from it out of 
a territory. These people think one picture is like 
another, and they sometimes won't even listen to 
you." 

He added that the proposed duty was promoted 
by certain factors in the Australian film industry, 
who expected through it to hit at exchanges with 
whose policies they had been differing for years. 

May Raise Admission Tax 

A labor government, he warned, was watching 
the receipts of first run theatres and might increase 
the admissions tax. "They want to hit these key 
exhibitors," he said, "and they think a high admis- 
sion tax will do it, and we think it will discourage 
admissions drastically." 

The present admission tax, he pointed out, was 
25 per cent on the first shilling, and 25 per cent 
on each six pence thereafter. 

The Government will push homes before every- 
thing else after the war, Mr. Mclntyre expects. It 
will do this on the theory it is now advancing, that 
the soldier has deserved everything the country 
can give, and that the home for the soldier is the 
most important. This might delay building of thea- 
tres, he warned, adding that after home building, 
the Government next would push water conserva- 
tion, to make now barren areas able to support 
immigrants. 

Their income doubled since 1939, Australians 
spend much of it on motion pictures ; in fact, they 
are the world's greatest motion picture fans, ac- 
cording to Mr. Mclntyre. 

Approximately 3,500,000 Australians attended 
films each week, he said ; and their consumption of 
screen literature was so great that the average 
person knew more about the affairs of Hollywood 
than an exchange manager. 

Prefer Comedies and Musicals 

Their tastes run to comedy and musicals, and 
thus are the same as those of the American ; but 
Australians do not like horror or war stories, nor 
serials, he said. Deanna Durbin, and Abbott and 
Costello were tremendous favorites, Mr. Mclntyre 
said. 

Selling pictures in Australia was a matter of 
"know how," Mr. Mclntyre added, saying : "They'll 
go for most types of pictures so long as you know 
how to give it to them, and good advertising and 
hard work have put the industry where it is in 
Australia today — without opposition as entertain- 
ment, except for the beaches." 

Although personal taxes were high, the industry 
had not suffered, because the Australian was a 
spender, Mr. Mclntyre said. The advertising in 
newspapers, limited now in six-page papers to three 
inches in two columns, has been compensated for 
by increased use of radio. The advertisements 
now are ingeniously devised to exert greatest ap- 
peal, and their headlines are their chief factor, he 
said. Poster displays, he noted, have not been 
restricted. 

Mr. Mclntyre, mentioning the extraordinary runs 
of pictures now, many going for seven weeks, added 
that "Arabian Nights" had scored such runs, even 
in Perth, a small city. He noted also that English 




Staff Photo 



H. C. McINTYRE 



pictures did not compete with American. Only 20 
were shown per year. 

Of production, he said Charles Chauvel's "Rats 
of Tobruk" probably would be ready for release 
in September, after 15 months, during which it had 
been hampered by the necessity of obtaining Army 
and Government cooperation, of training stars, of 
developing a studio, and getting equipment. 

The eight American distributors had supplied, 
gratis, to the Australian soldier, 177,000,000 feet 
of entertainment, and scored heavily in popularity, 
said Mr. Mclntyre. The soldiers write home and 
boost the picture shown them pre-release. 

When Mr. Mclntyre returns, he will stage a 
"25 year sales campaign," marking his 25 years 
in the film business. 

Mr. Mclntyre's Universal organization has for 
its employees a Provident Fund, which is said to 
be a forerunner of such funds and pension plans 
in America. Mr. Mclntyre said: 

"A 24-year-old organization, we picked good, 
young, hard workers when we began. They have 
given the whole of their lives to advancement of 
Universal. When I got to a stage where I was 
making a lot of money, I felt the right thing to do 
was to protect our fellows. I set aside one half of 
my income, as my part. The reaction has been to 
dispel fear, and to build a realization of the things 
that big business can do for workers if they give 
their best. Our fellows will go out at 55 and 56 
not fearing the wolf at the door." 

Mr. Mclntyre cited Australia's labor government, 
and the fears it will socialize industry. He said, 
"The way to combat that is to give your employees 
something with which to take care of them in their 
old age." 

Edward E. Collins, San Antonio 
Interstate Manager, Dies 

Edward E. Collins, 49, for five years manager 
in San Antonio, for Interstate Theatres, died sud- 
denly at his home there July 8. In the show busi- 
ness almost 23 years, Mr. Collins had been man- 
ager of the Majestic theatre. He was a native of 
Greenville, Texas. At the time of his death Mr. 
Collins was San Antonio chairman of the industry's 
War Activities Committee, and had been an active 
participant in all the War Loans. In 1941 and 
1942 he was local chairman of the Infantile Paraly- 
sis Fund drive. His widow, Mrs. Lona Collins, 
two daughters and one sister survive. 



Major David F. Silverstein 

Major David F. Silverstein, U. S. Army Signal 
Corps Photographic Center, Astoria, N. Y., died 
July 7 at the Halloran Hospital, Staten Island, 
N. Y. Major Silverstein held the Purple Heart, 
and 12 other medals from World War One. He 
was a writer for MGM, Columbia, Universal, Re- 
public, and Charlie Chaplin, and joined the Army 
training film program with the outbreak of the 
current war. He leaves his widow, the former 
Alyce Grayson, and a son, Richard. 



Wage Increases 
For Exchanges 
Are Foreseen 

An application by Seattle exchange service wc I 
ers seeking a 10 per cent wage increase thro It 
the Regional War Labor Board was signed 1 
weekend, with approval of similar applications B 
exchanges throughout the country to follow. 

Home office approval was given the 10 per <| 
raise principle some time ago, but had been ballc 
by the WLB. The regional board in Philadel] I 
on May 17 turned down an application from I 
workers in Loew's Washington branch, over wl \ 
it had jurisdiction, and the workers have since fl 
an appeal with the WLB headquarters in Wash: I 
ton, hoping for a favorable ruling to set a precetltj 
for regional offices to follow. 

Affected are some 2,000 employees in all I 
change centers. They have already received - 
creases amounting to about 12 per cent under 
"Little Steel Formula," but it is disclosed that I 
film companies nevertheless are having diffic I 
in keeping many from leaving for more lucra I 
jobs. 



Chicago Operato 
Contract Signed 

. I 

The Chicago Moving Pictures Operators Ur h 
signed an agreement last weekend with local J 
cuits and independent exhibitors which runs p 
September 1, 1945. 

The contract provides wage scale ranges f i h 
$2 to $3 per hour, depending upon the classificat'i 
and seating capacity of the house. It also provii 
the projectionist an additional 30 minutes per wo] 
ing day for preparation, to be paid by the exhibi 1 

Among the circuits covered by the agreen't 
are Balaban and Katz, Great States, H. and * 
Balaban Corporation, Warner Bros., Sam Me;:, 
Schoenstadt, Essaness and Alliance. Jack Kin ., 
president of Allied Theatres of Illinois, signed e 
contract for some 150 independent exhibitors. In 
pact was signed for the union by Eugene J. Atlj- 
son, business manager ; Clarence A. Jalas, his II 
sistant; James Gorman, president, and Dan Carrj!, 
attorney, who drafted the contract. 



Loew's to Pay $10,000 
In Back Salaries 

Voluntary payment of more than $10,000 Je 
648 employees is being made by Loew's, Inc. It 
was announced Wednesday by Arthur J. Whf, 
New York regional director of the Wage and H |r 
and Public Contracts Divisions, U. S. Departm |t 
of Labor. The money represents overtime pay 'le. 
checkers in 31 film exchanges in 24 states and fe 
District of Columbia. The checkers are the c I 
employees affected. 

Mr. White said that the overtime, which total!! 
$10,825.92, was computed by the company :\i 
represented back wages due from October 24, IS M 
to June 5, 1943. 

In New York City, 68 employees of the Le tr 
exchange will receive $2,266.90. 



Universal Votes Dividends 

Universal's board of directors last week decla^ 
a third-quarter dividend of 50 cents per share In j 
the company's stock, payable July 31 to stoH 
holders of record July 19; also for the for pj 
quarter, a dividend of the same amount, payjie 
October 31 to stockholders of record October !>• 



20th Century-Fox Shares Offered 

A special offering of 34,000 common shares jf 
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation made a 
the New York Stock Exchange floor by Wrl:, 
Weld & Company at 10:16 A.M. July 6 was o\U 
subscribed by 10 :40 A.M. 



42 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, I 4: 



WARNER BROS.' TRADE SHOWINGS OF 

"JANIE" 

Also Showings of "CRIME BY NIGHT" 

MONDAY, JULY 24, 1944* 



CITY 


PLACE OF SHOWNG 


ADDRESS 


JANIE 


r% hip 

CRIME 
BY NIGHT 


Albany 


Warner Screening Room 


79 N. Pearl St. 


12:30 P.M. 


2:15 P.M. 


Atlanta 


RKO Screening Room 


191 Walton St. N.W. 


2:00 P.M. 


3:45 P.M. 


Boston 


RKO Screening Room 


122 Arlington St. 


2:00 P.M. 


3:45 P.M. 


Buffalo 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


290 Franklin St. 


2:45 P.M. 


1:30 P.M. 


Charlotte 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


308 S. Church St. • 


10:00 A.M. 


2:00 P.M. 


Chicago 


Warner Screening Room 


1307 S. Wabash Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


3:15 P.M. 


Cincinnati 


RKO Screening Room 


Palace Th. Bldg. E 6th 


7:15 P.M. 


9:15 P.M. 


Cleveland 


Warner Screening Room 


2300 Payne Ave. 


8:00 P.M. 


10:45 P.M. 


Dallas 


Paramount Sc. Room 


412 S. Harwood 


2:00 P.M. 


10:30A.M. 


Denver 


Paramount Sc. Room 


2100 Stout St. 


2:00 P.M. 


3:45 P.M. 


Des Moines 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1300 High St. 


12:45 P.M. 


2:30 P.M. 


Detroit 


Film Exchange Bldg. 


2310 Cass Ave. 


1:00 P.M. 


2:50 P.M. 


Indianapolis 


Paramount Sc. Room 


116 W. Michigan 


1:00 P.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


Kansas City 


Paramount Sc. Room 


18th and Wyandotte St. 


1:30 P.M. 


3:30 P.M. 


Los Angeles 


Vitagraph Sc. Room 


2025 S. Vermont Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


3:45 P.M. 


Memphis 


Paramount Sc. Room 


362 S. Second St. 


11:00 A.M. 


2:00 P.M. 


Milwaukee 


Warner Th. Sc. Rm. 


212 W. Wisconsin Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


3:45 P.M. 


Minneapolis 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1015 Currie Ave. 


2:00 P.M. 


10:30A.M. 


New Haven 


Warner Th. Proj. Room 


70 College St. 


1:00 P.M. 


10:30A.M. 


New Orleans 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


200 S. Liberty St. 


10:00 A.M. 


2:00 P.M. 


New York 


Home Office 


321 W. 44th St. 


2:30 P.M. 


10:30A.M. 


Oklahoma 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


10 North Lee Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


10:30 A.M. 


Omaha 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1502 Davenport St. 


1:60 P.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


Philadelphia 


Vine St. Sc. Room 


1220 Vine St. 


11:00 A.M. 


2:30 P.M. 


Pittsburgh 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


1715 Blvd. of Allies 


10:00 A.M. 


2:00 P.M. 


Portland 


Star Screening Room 


925 N. W. 19th Ave. 


2:45 P.M. 


1:30 P.M. 


*Salt Lake 


20th Century-Fox Sc. Rm. 


216 East 1st South 


2:00 P.M. 


3 :50 P.M. 


San Francisco 


Republic Sc. Room 


221 Golden Gate Ave. 


1:30 P.M. 


3:15 P.M. 


Seattle 


Jewel Box Sc. Room 


2318 Second Ave. 


1:00 P.M. 


2:45 P.M. 


St. Louis 


S'renco Sc. Room 


3143 Olive St. 


1:00 P.M. 


2:45 P.M. 


Washington 


Earle Th. Bldg. 


13th & E Sts., N.W. 


10:00 A.M. 


11:45 A.M. 



WAR BULLETIN! PLEASE HAVE FIGURES READY *Salt Lake - Tuesday, July 25th. 

FOR 5th WAR LOAN SALES REPORT! 



George B. Seitz, 
Pioneer Director, 
Dies at 56 

Gecrge B. Seitz, screen writer and pioneer 
director, who created and produced many of the 
screen thrillers of the early days, died of a cir- 
cu'atory ailment July 8, at the home of his son 
in Westwood, Cal., at the age of 56. 

Mr. Seitz had been under contract to Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer since 1930 and directed all but 
one of the 14 Andy Hardy Family pictures. 

Born in Boston, he became an artist, later writ- 
ing stories to accompany his paintings. He turned 
to acting with the Castle Square Opera Company 
in Boston, and the John Craig stock company. At 
21 he wrote a play, "The King's Game." 

In 1914 Mr. Seitz entered the motion picture 
business with the Pathe company. His first work 
was writing, producing, directing and acting in the 
Pearl White serials. After his success with Pathe, 
he later directed for Paramount, Columbia, 
Universal, Metropolitan, Fox, RKO, and other 
companies. 

Surviving him are his widow ; a son, George 
B. Jr. ; and a daughter, Mrs. J. H. Adams, of 
Portland, Me. 

A. M. Saloman Killed in 
Robot Bomb Explosion 

Warner Bros, home office as well as the studio 
in Burbank observed two minutes of silence at 
3 P.M. last Friday out of respect to A. M. Salo- 
man, former manager of the Teddington Studios 
in London, who was killed by a robot bomb ex- 
plosion in England. 

Mr. Saloman was born in California in 1891 and 
started working for Warner Bros. San Francisco 
Exchange in 1915 as a shipping clerk. In 1932 he 
was transferred to England as studio manager of 
Teddington. 

During the recent Nazi robot bomb attacks one 
unidentified studio was heavily damaged, causing 
the death of three studio people. 

Harry Nolan, Producer, 
Theatre Operator 

Funeral services were held in Denver last week 
,or Harry Nolan, 72, who produced the old film, 
'Daddy Long Legs," operated theatres in Colorado 
and Oklahoma, and was franchise holder for the 
First National in Denver and Salt Lake. He died 
in a local hospital following a short illness. His 
irst theatre was opened in Denver in 1906. While 
still an exhibitor, Mr. Nolan went to Hollywood 
and aided Carl Laemmle in the formation of Uni- 
_ versal and also assisted in the production of films 
starring Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplan and 
others. 



Nat Carr 

Funeral services were held at the Little Church 
of the Flowers, Forest Lawn, Glendale, Cal., July 4, 
for Nat Carr, actor, who had been ill several 
months. He played one of the leads in the first all- 
talking short produced by Warner at the old 
Vitagraph studio in Hollywood. Mr. Carr was 57 
and is survived by his widow, Gertrude, under 
contract to Warner. 



Daniel Danker 

Daniel Danker, 40, vice-president of J. Walter 
Thompson agency, died of heart attack at home, 
the Beverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills, Cal. He 
was creator of the Lux radio show and other pro- 
grams. He is survived by his widow, former Lorena 
Layson, and daughter Suzanne. 



Paul M. Powell 

Funeral services were held at Forest Lawn, 
Glendale, Cal., July 6, for Paul M. Powell, who 
died July 3 in Pasadena at 63. Mr. Powell was 
associated with D. W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, and 
Paramount in the silent era, later working in 
England. 




GEORGE B. SEITZ 



Many Film Notables at 
J. S. McLeod Services 

More than 250 Loew's and MGM executives, 
associates and friends attended the funeral services 
July 10 for J. S. McLeod, late MGM film and 
exchange maintenance head, who was killed in the 
Sante Fe train wreck last week. The services 
were held at Coughlin's Funeral Home, New York, 
and burial at the Mt. Hope Cemetery, Scarsdale, 
N. Y. 

A number of union leaders also attended, includ- 
ing Richard F. Walsh, Louis Krouse and Joseph 
D. Basson ; also the following union negotiators 
of the film companies : A. Schubart, Clarence Hill, 
Frank Phelps, Mike Dolid, Pat Scollard, Tom 
Murray, Harry D. Buckley, Arthur Dickinson and 
A. W. Schwalberg. 

Among the Loew-MGM executives attending 
were David Bernstein, J. Robert Rubin, William F. 
Rodgers, Joseph R. Vogel, E. M. Saunders, J. E. 
Flynn, E. K. O'Shea, Howard Dietz, Silas F. 
Seadler, H. M. Richey, C. K. Stern, M. N. Wolf, 
J. T. Mills, Leopold Friedman, Sam Gardner, Lou 
Amacher, John Bowen, Ralph Pielow, Ben Abner, 
Major Harry A. Miller, William Ferguson, Wil- 
liam D. Kelly, David Blum, O. O. Decker, Sam 
Cohen, Irwin Margolies, Ben Melniker, Davy Levy, 
John Murphy, Irving Greenfield, A. Weltman, E. 
W. Aaron, Harold Postman, Lester B. Isaacs, Joel 
Bezahler, Charles Deesen and others. 



Isidor H. Herk 

Funeral services were held July 7 for Isidor H. 
Herk at the Riverside Chapel, New York. Mr. 
Herk, 61, who died at the New York Post Gradu- 
ate Hospital, was the producer of 'Wine, Women 
and Song." He had been president of Mutual 
Burlesque Association, and at one time was man- 
ager of the Gaiety theatre, New York. He is sur- 
vived by his widow, Lola Engel Herk. 



Fred L. Mills 

Fred L. Mills, president of the Mills Industries, 
Inc., manufacturer of coin-operated machinery, and 
developer of "juke boxes," died July 5 at the 
Delnor Hospital, St. Charles, 111., after a year's 
illness. He was 49. 



Frederick V. Fisher 

Frederick V. Fisher, 68, Seattle financier, and 
for some years connected with Greater Theatres 
Corporation, in the Jensen von Herberg circuit, 
died in Seattle, June 30 of a heart attack. 



"Minstrel Man" in New York 

PRC's "Minstrel Man" starring Benny Fields 
and Gladys George, will have its first run New 
York engagement at the Victoria theatre, open- 
ing July 15. The film was produced by Leon 
Fromkess and directed by Joseph H. Lewis. 
Original song lyrics were by Harry Revel and 
Paul Webster, and Ferde Grofe composed the 
musical score. 



Levey Pleads for 
Television and 
Film Cooperation 

A plea for cooperation between the televisi< | 
companies and the film interests to avert a strugg 
that may "assume gigantic proportions" was voicj 
last week by Arthur Levey, president of the Sc 
phony Corporation of America, speaking at til 
television seminar of the Radio Executives CM 
New York. 

"I think it is obvious that the approaching efl 
of the European phase of the war will soon refk 
the growing public interest in television and ei 
phasize the greatly increased values behind tho 1 
motion picture companies already associated 
partners in Scophony Corporation with its immen 
potentialities in post-war," he said. 

"It would seem," he continued, "that an ente ; 
prise such as Scophony, contemplating unificati< 
of the film interests insofar as common promoti j 
and commercial development of television is eo | 
cerned, should have a strong appeal. 

"The struggle between the television compani 
and the film interests may assume gigantic prJ, 
portions, and it would therefore seem that a recorj 
mendation for cooperation between the motion pii 
ture interests should be considered sound." 

Major film companies, if so inclined, he observe! 
were in a good financial position to push televisii 
as a new industry allied to show business. 

Mr. Levey expressed confidence that a "comm< 
ground between all the major film companies f 
an understanding in the domain of television m; 
soon be reached, whereby the best brains in tjj 
motion picture industry will be enabled to col 
centrate upon the advancement of the television aj 
and the coordination of its activities to that of m i 
tion pictures. Such a desirable end would he! 
towards the stabilization of the television art ai| 
should eventually result in New York becomii; 
the television center of the world." 

Raymond E. Nelson, vice-president of ti 
Charles M. Storm Company, advertising agencj 
discussed television programming at the seminar ! 

RKO Plans to Televise 
Democratic Convention 

RKO Television Corporation has completed pla:| 
for covering the national Democratic conventii j 
for NBC telecasting, it was announced by Rail i 
B. Austrian, executive vice-president of the RK| 
subsidiary. The affair will be covered by four crevjj 
of cameramen and sound experts who will opera i 
both at the stadium and at the hotels where ti] 
delegates will be quartered. Each day's shootii 
will be flown to New York and processed for tel" 
casting the following day, over WNBT, Ne II 
York ; WPTZ, Philadelphia, and WRGB, Schene \ 
tady. 

DuMont Gets $2,500,000 
Television Orders 

Post-war television equipment orders to tl 
amount of $2,500,000 have been received by tl 
Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Inc., Paramou 
affiliate, under a newly established "equipme 
reservation plan" Leonard Cramer, vice-preside ! 
of the company, said this week. Additional orde 
for $1,500,000 worth of equipment are said to In 
pending. Under the plan, equipment for the open 
tion of television stations will be delivered in ord 
of application. 

"This Is the Army" Has 
Big Mexican Opening 

A demonstration of Mexican good will towa 
the United States took place in Mexico City ai 
five other leading cities of Mexico with the s 
multaneous opening last weekend of the Warn 
Bros, production of Irving Berlin's "This Is tl I 
Army." The premiere at Mexico City's Alamet 
theatre was a holiday affair, with the mayor, merj j 
bers of the cabinet, and diplomatic representativ 
attending, while the presidential band played bo j 
outside and on the stage. 



44 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19- 



'/what the 

picture hid for me* 



Columbia 

BEAUTIFUL BUT BROKE: Joan Davis, John Hub- 
terd — Good for dual billing. People like it. Played Friday, 
fcaturday, June 30, July 1 — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, 
Tilbury, Ont. Small town patronage. 

DESTROYER: Edward G. Robinson. Glenn Ford— 
itory of the men on the high seas that man the destroy - 
rs. Full of action and entertainment with a good star 
aking a good part, and a good cast. All through would 
ecommend this one. Played Saturday. June 1/ — A. L. 
i>>ve, Bengough Theatre, Bengough, Sask., Canada. Rural 
tnd small town patronage. / 

STAND BY ALL NETWORKS: John Beal, Florence 
Sice — Didn't do business. Played it to a very small 
indience. Very hot weathe. ; farmers very" busy. Played 
Sunday, June 25 — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Til- 
pury, Ont. Small town patronage. 

WHAT A WOMAN: Rosalind Russell, Brian Aherne— A 
Bood sophisticated comedy, but for patrons, it was poison. 
(Those who came liked the picture, but there were entirely 
i oo few cash customers, and we are still trying to do 
Dig on a "volume basis," not catering to the select few. 
For one theatre Columbia will have to go back to making 
three or four Blondies a year, which are at least "average 
box-office" with us, and keep these de-luxe specials. 
Played Sunday, Monday, June 25, 26 — A. H. Kaufman, 
(Fountain Theatre, Terre Haute, Ind. Family patronage. 

Vie+ro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ABOVE SUSPICION: Joan Crawford, Fred MacMur- 
!j-ay — Spy story enjoyed by all my patrons who turned out 
>:o see it. Old story and very hot weather killed the box 
bffice. Played Saturday. June 24 — A. L. Dove, Bengough 
Theatre. Bengough Sask, Canada. Rural and small town 
patronage. 

GIRL CRAZY: Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland— A good 
picture but it was rained out. Played Thursday-Saturday, 
fune 15-17 — Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher Creek, Alberta. 
Small town patronage. 

GIRL CRAZY: Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland— Very 
good production but the old Rooney yet young, is slipping 
f?ery badly. About washed up here. However, a very good 
:ast supporting and plenty of music and dancing, and 
«me Western stuff that goes over with my audience. 
Recommend this one. Played Friday. June 30— A. L. Dove, 
Sengough Theatre, Bengough Sask, Canada. Rural and 
imall town patronage. 

LOST ANGEL: Margaret O'Brien, James Craig— Started 
I little slow, but turned out to be good, well received. 
J layed Tuesday, June 20— F. R. Crist, Crist Theatre, 
-x>veland, O. Small town patronage. / 

SALUTE TO THE MARINES: Wallace Beery, Fay 
3ainter — A much better picture than I expected and wish 

had given it a better date, but the war-angle made me 
>hy. It's there all right but it isn't brutal or too emotional. 

mean the war-angle. Played Monday-Wednesday. May 
5-17— Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher Creek, Alberta. 
?amily patronage. 

SONG OF RUSSIA: Robert Taylor, Susan Peters— Too 
ouch dialogue. Too many dark scenes, and the rest was 
var. The smallest gross I have had on Sundav for months. 
p layed Sunday, Monday, June 18. 19— F. R.' Crist, Crist 
Tieatre, Loveland, O. Small town patronage. 

SONG OF RUSSIA: Robert Taylor. Susan Peters— 
iwell picture. All comments good. Business off but no 
ault of the picture. One patron said. "That is the best 
•icture that you have ever played." Plaved Monday, 
"uesday. June 19, 20— Cleo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, 
?uena Vista. Ga. Small town patronage. 

STAND BY FOR ACTION: Robert Taylor. Brian 
Jonlevy— This reissue did fair business in spite of the 
teat. This is first MGM picture we nlayed in two years, 
'laved Wednesday, Thursday, June 28. 29— Harland" Ran - 
:m. Plaza Theatre. Tilbury', Ont. Small town patronage. 

THOUSANDS CHEER: Kathryn Grayson. Gene Kelly— 
■Tiere's lots of entertainment in this picture. Played 
Monday-Wednesday. May 22-24— Del Fox. Fox Theatre, 

incher Creek, Alberta. Small town patronage. 



. . . the original exhibitors' reports department, established October 14, 1916. In it 
theatremen serve one another with information about the box-office performance of 
product — providing a service of the exhibitor for the exhibitor. ADDRESS REPORTS: 
What the Picture Did for Me, Motion Picture Herald, Rockefeller Center, New York 20. 



Sonogram 



Paramount 



GULLIVER'S TRAVELS: Cartoon in Color— Well 
enjoyed by everyone who saw it. Some said that it was 
"childish," but I think they enjoyed it, too. This is a 
good family picture that should have drawn more, but 
the hot weather kept everyone at home. The story was 
good but the animation was not as good as the later 
cartoons — this one "jerked" too much. Played Tuesday- 
Saturday, June 20-25 — Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical De- 
partment, Heart Mountain, Wyo. Small town patronage. 

LADY IN THE DARK: Ginger Robers, Ray Milland— I 
thought this very different. It didn't appeal to many. 
Seemed to fail to register. Business only a little better 
than normal. Played Monday, Tuesday, June 26, 27 — 
Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont. Small 
town patronage. 

LET'S FACE IT: Bob Hope, Betty Hutton— This one 
is different than the others by Bob Hope. Usually his 
pictures are "corny," but this one wasn't so bad — maybe 
it's Betty Hutton. Played Tuesday-Saturday, June 13-17 
— Andrew Mayeshiba. Technical Department, Heart 
Mountain, Wyo. Small town patronage. 

MEMPHIS BELLE: War Documentary— This govern- 
ment release should be shown by every theatre, in order 
to show the folks at home what a tough time the boys 
have on everv Bomber raid — should help the 5th War 
Loan. Played Thursday, Friday. June 22. 23— A. H. Kauf- 
man, Fountain Theatre, Terre Haute, Ind. Family patron- 
age. 

MEMPHIS BELLE: Documentary— This was a very 
interesting subject from every viewpoint. It should bring 
a clearer realization to those at home what we owe to our 
boys who are doing the fighting for us. Played Friday, 
Saturday, June 23. 24r— A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, 
Scotia, Calif. Small lumber • town patronage. 

MIRACLE OF MORGAN'S CREEK: Eddie Bracken, 
Betty Hutton — Some liked it, others thought it very silly. 
Personally, I got a big bang out of it, but the box office 
said it was a little under average. Played Thursday- 
Saturday, May 18-20.— Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher 
Creek, Alberta. Small town patronage. 

STANDING ROOM ONLY: Paulette Goddard, Fred 
MacMurray — Nice little comedy that was allocated too 
high. Business below par. Played Fridav, Saturday, 
June 16. 17.— F. R. Crist. Crist Theatre, Loveland, O. 
Small town patronage. 



Republic 



RUBBER RACKETEERS: Rochelle Hudson, Ricardo 
-ortez— Not as good as we thought. It seems as if every- 
■ne enjoyed it somewhat and a few good comments were 
leard, but we have seen better pictures. Played Monday. 

une 26— Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Department. Heart 
Mountain. Wyo. General patronage. 



COWBOY AND SENORITA, THE: Roy Rogers, Dale 
Evans — Good western and well received by the weekend 
crowd. Business average. Played Friday, Saturday. 
June 23. 24.— Deo Manry, Buena Vista Theatre, Buena 
Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 

ROSIE THE RIVETER: Jane Frazee, Frank Albertson 
— Good little picture for one-day play. Many laughs; 
business average. Played Sunday, June 18.— Cleo Manry, 
Buena Vista Theatre, Buena Vista, Ga. Small town pat- 
ronage. 



RKO 

VICTORY THROUGH AIR POWER: Disney Aviation 
Feature — I ran this picture on D plus two, quite by acci- 
dent, I assure you. By running a special reader, screen- 
ing the picture for the local Air Cadets, and by tieing in 
the prophecies of the picture with the European Invasion, 
enough interest was created to show a nrofit, which prob- 
ably would not have been possible under normal circum- 
stances. Played Thursday. June f — De' Fox, Fox Thea- 
tre, Pincher Creek, Alberta. Family patronage. 

Twentieth Century- Fox 

CLAUDIA: Dorothy McGuire. Robert Young — Fair 
business predominate fair sex. Played Monday-Wednes- 
day, May 29-31.— Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher Creek, 
Alberta. Small town patronage. 

HAPPY LAND: Don Ameche, Frances Dee— Business 
was above average and every one was very pleased with 
the picture, and the splendid work of the cast. Harry 
Carey is always an asset to any picture. The young 



sailor almost stole the show. Played Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, June 21, 22.— A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, Sco- 
tia, Calif. Small lumber town patronage. 

IN OLD CHICAGO: Alice Faye, Tyrone Power— This 
being a period picture helped put it over and conse- 
quently went over better than the average old reissue. 
Played Friday, Saturday, June 23, 24.— A. S. Edwards, 
Winema Theatre. Scotia, Calif. Small lumber town pat- 
ronage. 

SULLIVANS, THE: Anne Baxter. Thomas Mitchell— 
Even the tears were in the eyes of the patrons. "They 
all said it was a grand picture." Some came back the 
second time. Acting grand. Played Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, June 21, 22. — Cleo Manry. Buena Vista Theatre, 
Buena Vista, Ga. Small town patronage. 



United Artists 



UP IN MABEL'S ROOM: Dennis O'Keefe, Marjorie 
Reynolds — Here is a dandy comedy slightly spiced for Ma 
and Pop, but well fumigated with an eye to Junior. If 
you're tired of messing around with war pictures, you 
can't go wrong with this number. Played Monday - 
Wednesday, June 12-14. — Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher 
Creek, Alberta. Small town patronage. 

WOMAN OF THE TOWN: Albert Dekker, Claire 
Trevor — The News Reel I ran with this picture featured 
a local boy, CBS War Correspondent Mathew Halton, re- 
porting from Italy, whose personal appearances on my 
stage have sold enough war bonds to plug the holes he 
wore therein. A gala crowd turned out including the 
guests of honor, his mother and father, and out of this 
conglomeration of the show-going public, everyone seemed 
to find something in "Woman of the Town" to their lik- 
ing. In fact, more so than many anticipated. Played 
Thursday-Saturday, May 11-13. — Del Fox. Fox Theatre, 
Pincher Creek, Alberta. Small town patronage. 



Universal 



HIS BUTLER'S SISTER: Deanna Durbin, Franchot 
Tone — Business was good the first night but fell off the 
second. It was an interesting picture that pleased every 
one who saw it. Played Sundav. Monday, June 25, 26. — 
A. S. Edwards, Winema Theatre, Scotia, Calif. Small 
town patronage. 

PHANTOM LADY: Ella Raines, Franchot Tone— First 
murder mystery we've had in a long time. Enjoyed by 
almost everyone— although it didn't do top flight busi- 
ness. Box office was off quite a bit, but we attribute that 
to the hot weather. It was too hot to walk down to the 
theatre. Played Tuesday -Sunday, June 20-25.— Andrew 
Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Mountain, 
Wyo. Small town patronage. 



Warner Bros. 

ACTION IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC: Humphrey 
Bogart. Raymond Massey— I don't know why, but Bogart 
doesn't go over here. This is a dandy picture 
with everything that the title promises, but I just broke 
even with it. Played Thursday-Saturday, June 1-3.— Del 
Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher Creek, Alberta. Small town 
patronage. 

DESTINATION TOKYO: Cary Grant, John Garfield— 
A swell picture with great photography that everybody 
liked. The title kept the war-weary home the first night, 
but word-of-mouth dug them out. Played Thursdav- 
Saturday, June 22-24.— Del Fox, Fox Theatre, Pincher 
Creek, Alberta. Small town patronage. 

IN OUR TIME: Ida Lupino, Paul Henried— Definitely 
not a small town picture. Had almost two-thirds of a 
crowd.- Played Friday, Saturday, June 23, 24. — F. R. 
Crist, Crist Theatre, Loveland, O. Small town patronage. 



Short Features 
Me+ro-Goidwyn-Mayer 

ON THE ROAD TO MONTEREY: Fitzpatrick Travel- 
talks— Very good colored Travelogue. My patrons all en- 
(Continued on page 48) 



vIOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



45 





RAIDED 



Walt Disney's 

SHOW WHITE 



(Continued from page 45) 
joy them. Educational and instructive. — A. L. Dove, Ben- 
gough Theatre, Bengough, Sask., Canada. 

SCHOOL DAYS: Technicolor Cartoons — This was an 
old one but it still drew laughs from the kids. A flip the 
frog cartoon. — Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, 
Heart Mountain, Wyo. 

Universal 

SOUTH SEA RHYTHM: Swing _ Symphonies— Special- 
izing in Hawaiian music, this one is another of Univer- 
sal's excellent musical shorts. Hilo Hattie did her usual 
specialty number and drew her share of musical laughs. 
— Andrew Mayeshiba, Technical Department, Heart Moun- 
tain, Wyo. 

Vitaphone 

E&RLY WORM GETS THE BIRD: Blue Ribbon Mer- 
rie Melodies — Well received Warner short. — Harland Ran- 
kin, Plaza Theatre, Tilbury, Ont. 

SPIRIT OF ANNAPOLIS: Broadway Brevity— Very 
good, and timely. — Harland Rankin, Plaza Theatre, Til- 
bury, Ont. 

BEHIND THE BIG TOP: Technicolor Specials— A very 
good colored two-reeler of the life in the Winter quarters 
of the Circus. Good one for the kiddies. — A. L. Dove, 
Bengough Theatre, Bengough, Sask., Canada. 

"Going My Way" 
Hits New High 

The Leo McCarey production, "Going My Way," 
starring Bing Crosby, is breaking many box- 
office records all over the nation and may soon 
establish itself among the all-time top grossing 
pictures of the industry, according to Charles M. 
Reagan, Paramount vice-president in charge of 
distribution, after analyzing box office figures from 
cities in all parts of the country. 

It Atlantic City the film was held over for a 
second week at the Warner theatre, the first time 
this was done with any film except "This Is the 
Army." In Philadelphia the picture established the 
city's all-time one-day box office record. In Wil- 
mington, Del., at the Warner theatre, it ran up a 
gross 25 per cent higher than any Paramount 
picture ever played in that house, and was the only 
film ever to play a second week in the theatre's 
history. 

In the Chicago theatre, Chicago, the picture was 
held for the fifth week, first in the 26-year history 
of the house. Tying the 10-week run of "Lady 
in the Dark" at the New York Paramount theatre, 
the longest in the history of the house, "Going 
My Way" is establishing a new attendance mark 
in its tenth and final week, playing to an estimated 
1,007,000 persons. 

Good Holiday Week for 
Three Warner Releases 

Reports from approximately 50 situations re- 
ceived by Warner Bros, on the July 4 holiday 
week business of "The Mask of Dimitrios," which 
went into general release July 1, showed box of- 
fice receipts averaging 18 per cent above normal 
and in practically every case topping last year's 
Independence Day, it was reported. 

Preceding Warner release, "Make Your Own 
Bed," in reports from about 40 smaller situations, 
showed business approximately 16 per cent over 
the seasonal average. 

In its first showing outside New York, where 
it is in the seventh week of a pre-release run, 
"Mr. Skeffington" is doing 15 per cent better than 
"Watch on the Rhine" in its second week in At- 
lantic City, the company said. 



Sugarman Joins Agency 

Elias Sugarman, former editor and general man- 
ager of the New York office of Billboard, recently 
honorably discharged from the Army, has joined 
General Amusement Corporation in the act de- 
partment. He will be associated with Harry Kilby 
in scheduling acts for restaurants and cafes. Mr. 
Sugarman, who was with Billboard for 18 years, 
was formerly Abbot of the Friars and until recent- 
ly was active in the Associated Motion Picture 
Advertisers. He is a member of the National 
Showmen's Association and the Jewish Theatrical 
Guild of America. 



SHORT PRODUCT 
PLAYING BROADWAY 

Week of July 10 



ASTOR 

Movie Pests MGM 

City of Brigham Young MGM 

Feature: Bathing Beauty MGM 

CAPITOL 

Disillusioned Bluebird Columbia 

Mat Maulers Columbia 

Feature: Two Girls and a Sailor . .MGM 

CRITERION 

Foster's Canary College Universal 

Feature: Christmas Holiday Universal 

GLOBE 

Thugs with Dirty Mugs Vitaphone 

Feature: The Hairy Ape U nited Artists 

GOTHAM 

Duck Soup to Nuts Vitaphone 

Feature: Dead End Warner Bros. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Russian Rhapsody Vitaphone 

Our Frontier in Italy Vitaphone 

Winner's Circle Vitaphone 

Feature: Mr. Skeffington Warner Bros. 

MUSIC HALL 

Back Door to Tokyo 20th Cent.-Fox 

Boot and Spur : RKO Radio 

Feature: Once Upon a Time Columbia 

PARAMOUNT 

Popular Science, No. 5 Paramount 

We're on Our Way to Rio. . . . Paramount 

Winged Couriers Paramount 

Liberation of Rome WAC 

Feature: And the Angels Sing. . . . Paramount 

RIALTO 

How to Fish RKO Radio 

Henpecked Rooster Paramount 

Amphibious Fighters Paramount 

Feature: The Mummy's Ghost.. . Universal 

RIVOLI 

Your Pet Problem Paramount 

Feature: Story of Dr. Wassell . . . . Paramount 

ROXY 

Wolf! Wolf! 20th Cent.-Fox 

Students of Form 20th Cent.-Fox 

Community Sing, No. 12 Columbia 

Liberation of Rome WAC 

Feature: Take It or Leave It ... . 20th Cent.-Fox 

STRAND 

Winner's Circle Vitaphone 

Filipino Sports Parade Vitaphone 

Angel Puss Vitaphone 



Feature: The Mask of Dimitrios. Warner Bros. 



B. P. Schulberg Joins 
Vanguard Films 

B. P. Schulberg, one of Hollywood's pioneer 
producers and production executives, this week 
joined David O. Selznick's production company, 
Vanguard Films, Inc., thereby resuming an asso- 
tiotion which he had with Mr. Selznick several 
years ago. Mr. Schulberg will serve in an ad- 
ministrative capacity for the company. 

The producer entered the industry in 1912 when 
he helped Adolph Zukor organize Famous Play- 
ers. In 1935 he joined Columbia in a production 
executive capacity. Later he was director of pro- 
duction for Paramount and between 1938 and 
1940 he was with the Selznick company. Mr. 
Schulberg returned to Columbia in 1940 and sev- 
ered his connection with the studio last year. 

Announcement also was made this week of the 
appointment of Sam Horowitz, formerly with 
United Artists and the A. H. Blank circuit of Des 
Moines to Neil Agnew's distribution staff at Van- 
guard. Mr. Horowitz will work out of the Chi- 
cago office. 



FROM REAPERS 

URGES INDUSTRY ASSIST 
CIRCUS IN DISASTER 

To the Editor of the Herald: 
Dear Mr. Quigley : 

If Ringling Bros, and Barnum and Bailey are 
in need of help of any kind due to their disaster 
of yesterday at Hartford, Conn., I believe the 
motion picture industry, as brother showmen an 
with your urging can and will lend them a hand 

I know nothing of their condition as to reserves 
insurance, etc., but if you find they really nee 
a lift, it seems they should have it. 

It certainly would not be a "gesture amiss." — 
WILLIAM S. CONWAY, Irvin Theatre, Can^ 
nelton, bid. 



WAC to Release 4 
Films in August 

Four new war information films for August rel 
lease were announced last week by the War Ac;, 
tivities Committee. The first, "Memo for Joe,'}) 
starring Qtientin Reynolds, is a dramatization o| 
'the part played by the National War Fund an| 
the Community Chests in keeping up the moral! 
of the soldier away from home. Produced bj 
RKO Pathe, it will be released August 10. 

"Report to Judy," Universal production schedti 
uled for August 24 release, is a combination of' 
WAVE recruiting information and action footag^i 
of the part the Navy has played in the war. 

Film bulletins to be attached to all newsreelij 
during August include : "Manning the Victonj 
Fleet," August 3 release, which states the nee«rj 
of the Merchant Marine for men. "Are You a| 
High School Graduate?", for release August 171 
reminds the youth of the nation that post-wa: ; j 
problems will require a higher level of ed'ucatioijj 
and training. 

The film bulletin "Last Furlough," originalhi 
scheduled for July 20 release, is to be released Jull 
13. "Prepare for Winter," fuel conservation filrii 
bulletin originally scheduled for August 3 is to b|j 
released July 20. 

;1 

AFE Sets Seven 
British Films 

A. F. E. Corporation, representatives in thil 
western hemisphere of Ealing Studios, Ltd., oi 
England, has arranged distribution deals for tw|' 
Ealing pictures with major companies. Twendj 
tieth Century-Fox will distribute "San Demetriif! 
— London" and Columbia will handle "Underj 
cover," now titled "Underground Guerillas." 

A. F. E. also will distribute through its owil 
facilities five other Ealing films, the first of whicll' 
is "48 Hours," distributed in England two year! 
ago as "Went the Day Well?". A. F. E. re-cui| 
and re-edited the picture, eliminating footage 
which, according to original reviews of the pic | 
ture, impeded the action. 

Now in its fourth week at the Little Carnegil 
theatre in New York, the picture has set box officii 
records and is scheduled for an indefinite run there| 
It was received enthusiastically by New Yorj 
newspaper critics. 

Carl Laemmle, Jr., Resumes 
Production Career 

Carl Laemmle, Jr., who was honorably disl 
charged from the 'army several weeks ago, hail 
arrived in Hollywood, where he stated he woull' 
resume his film career following a rest. Announce; 
ment of specific plans will be made later. M|i 
Laemmle entered the service in 1942 after sill 
years of independent production^ 



Launch Musicians' Ship 

The S.S. Ethelbert Nevin, a new Liberty Shf 
purchased by a Bond sale of Local 802 of til 
Musicians' Union in New York, was launched Jul 
13 at Jacksonville, Fla. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19^ 



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PICTURE 
CROSSES 



A statistical compilation and 
comparison of Box-OMce Per- 
formance in first-run theatres 



Figures directly below picture title compare dollar gross with average gross and show rela- 
tive percentage of all engagements tabulated. 

Figures opposite theatre names represent percentage of tabulated grosses to average weekly 
business based on the six months' period ending April 30, 1944. 

SYMBOLS: (DB) Double Bill— associate feature title; (SA) Stage Attraction; (MO) Move-Over 
Run; (AA) Advance Admission. 

INDEX: Over-all performance percentage figures from previously published final reports 
appear in Service Data section of Product Digest. See last column of Release Chart for Index. 



SHOW BUSINESS (RKO) 

Final Reports: 



Total Gross Tabulated $487,600 
Comparative Average Gross 492,900 
Over-all Performance 98.9% 



BALTIMORE— Hippodrome, 1st week 104.3% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

BALTIMORE— Hippodrome, 2nd week 96.1% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

BOSTON— Memorial, 1st week 116.1% 

(DB) The Yellow Canary (RKO) 

BOSTON— Memorial, 2nd week 95.9% 

(DB) The Yellow Canary (RKO) 

BUFFALO— 20th Century 93.1% 

(DB) Escape to Danger (RKO) 

CHICAGO— Palace, 1st week 96.9% 

(DB) Passport to Dfestiny (RKO) 

CHICAGO— Palace, 2nd week 62.0% 

(DB) Passport to Destiny (RKO) 

CHICAGO— Grand, MO 1st week 61.2% 

(DB) Passport to Destiny (RKO) 

CINCINNATI— RKO Palace 85.5% 

CINCINNATI— RKO Shubert, MO 1st week . . . 70.1% 

DENVER— Orpheum 101.5% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

DENVER— Broadway, MO 1st week 85.3% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

KANSAS CITY— Orpheum, 1st week 104.1% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

KANSAS CITY— Orpheum. 2nd week 97.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES— Carthay Circle 90.3% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES — Chinese 91.5% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES— Loew's State 112.8% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

LOS ANGELES— Uptown 94.3% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

MILWAUKEE— Warner 101.2% 

(DB) The Yellow Canary (RKO) 

NEW YORK— Palace, 1st week 116.3% 

NEW YORK— Palace, 2nd week 112.0% 

NEW YORK— Palace, 3rd week 86.2% 

NEW YORK— Palace, 4th week 81.9% 

PROVIDENCE— RKO Albee, 1st week 140.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

PROVIDENCE — RKO Albee, 2nd week .... 120.0% 

(DB) Action in Arabia (RKO) 

SAN FRANCISCO— Golden Gate 134.6% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

SEATTLE — Orpheum 76.0% 

ST. LOUIS— Ambassador 96.1% 

(DB) The Falcon Out West (RKO) 

ST. LOUIS— Missouri, MO 1st week 115.0% 

(DB) Pin Up Girl (20th-Fox) 

WASHINGTON— RKO Keith's 82.1% 

• 

GOING MY WAY (Para.) 

First Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $1,201,400 
Comparative Average Gross 998,500 
Over-all Performance 120.3% 



BOSTON— Metropolitan, 1st week 121.4% 

BOSTON— Metropolitan, 2nd week 142.8% 

BOSTON— Metropolitan, 3rd week 127.1% 

BOSTON— Fenway, MO 1st week 95.5% 

BOSTON— Fenway, MO 2nd week 134.3% 

BOSTON— Fenway, MO 3rd week 126.8% 

BOSTON— Paramount, MO 1st week 86.2% 

BOSTON— Paramount, MO 2nd week 155.1% 

BOSTON— Paramount, MO 3rd week 155.1% 

CHICAGO— Chicago, 1st week 134.6% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

CHICAGO— Chicago, 2nd week 128.5% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

CHICAGO— Chicago, 3rd week . 122.4% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 1st week 141.4% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount. 2nd week 125.0% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 3rd week 123.6% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 



NEW YORK— Paramount, 4th week 118.8% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 5th week 96.1% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 6th week 97.5% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 7th week 96.1% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 8th week 97.5% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

NEW YORK— Paramount, 9th week 97.5% 

(SA) Charlie Spivak's Orchestra 

PHILADELPHIA— Mastbaum 213.1% 

PROVIDENCE— Strand, 1st week 160.0% 

PROVIDENCE— Strand, 2nd week 161.8% 

PROVIDENCE— Strand, 3rd week 131.8% 

• 

THE STORY OF DR. WASSELL (Para.) 

Intermediate Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $522,100 
Comparative Average Gross 457,300 
Over-all Performance 114.1% 



BALTIMORE— Stanley 124.2% 

CHICAGO— State Lake 118.0% 

CLEVELAND— Loew's State 130.2% 

DENVER— Denham 145.4% 

INDIANAPOLIS— Indiana 113.2% 

KANSAS CITY— Newman 143.4% 



LOS ANGELES— Paramount Downtown, 1st week 145.0% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Downtown, 2nd week 121.6% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Downtown, 3rd week 92.3% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Downtown, 4th week 81.0% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Hollywood, 1st week 121.9% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Hollywood, 2nd week 113.8% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Hollywood, 3rd week 85.3% 

LOS ANGELES— Paramount Hollywood, 4th week 69.1% 



NEW YORK— Rivoli, 1st week 131.2% 

NEW YORK— Rivoli, 2nd week 114.9% 

NEW YORK— Rivoli, 3rd week 110.2% 

NEW YORK— Rivoli, 4th week 102.3% 

OMAHA— Paramount 96.5% 

WASHINGTON— Earle, 1st week 130.4% 

(SA) Vaudeville 
WASHINGTON— Earle, 2nd week 106.2% 

(SA) Vaudeville 
WASHINGTON— Metropolitan, MO 1st week . . 102.6% 
• 

THREE MEN IN WHITE (MGM) 

First Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $80,800 
Comparative Average Gross 63,100 
Over-all Performance 128.0% 

CINCINNATI— Keith's 102.0% 

OMAHA— Orpheum 105.2% 

PHILADELPHIA— Earle 165.0% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

PITTSBURGH— Warner 68.1% 

(DB) Three Russian Girls (UA) 

WASHINGTON— Loew's Columbia 118.7% 

• 

ROGER TOUHY, GANGSTER (20th-Fox) 

First Reports: 
Total Gross Tabulated $80,400 
Comparative Average Gross 77,600 
Over-all Performance 100.7% 



BUFFALO— Hippodrome 107.8% 

(DB) Hat-Check Honey (Univ.) 

OMAHA— Omaha 88.7% 

(DB) Hi Good Lookin' (Univ.) 

PROVIDENCE— Majestic 86.6% 

(DB) Candlelight in Algeria (20th-Fox) 

PROVIDENCE— Carlton, MO 1st week 112.5% 

(DB) Candlelight in Algeria (20th-Fox) 

SAN FRANCISCO— Warfield 127.2% 

(SA) Vaudeville 

WASHINGTON— Capitol '. 81.8% 

(SA) Vaudeville 



Dubbing Plans at 
Peak; Universal 
To Go to Spain 

Distributor attention to dubbing important prod 
uct in foreign languages in the race to reach th 
European market as soon as military operation 
permit, has reached the peak, with major com 
panies completing their plans as quickly as possible 

Universal, following a policy of experimenting 
on dubbing at a minimum cost, will dub French 
Italian and other language versions of their to] 
pictures in Spain, according to Joseph Seidelman 
vice-president in charge of foreign distribution 
Mr. Seidelman disclosed in New York Monday tha 
Universal believes dubbing production in Spain 
where studio facilities, talent and experience in th' 
art of dubbing had developed to a marked degre< 
even before the war, would reduce costs consider 
ably. The company will utilize frozen pesetas ii 
Spain to pay labor and talent, he said. Experience! 
actors, particularly French and Italian refugees, ar| 
available. 

Paramount Holding Plan 

Paramount, whose dubbing plans have been pend 
ing the last year or more, awaiting war develop 
ments, may also consider dubbing in Spain. 

Warner Bros., who began the synchronizatioi 
of voice to action almost two years ago, leads th 
field with nearly 20 pictures prepared in Frencl 
and Italian. 

MGM, according to an announcement Tuesda; 
from Morton Spring, acting manager of the com 
pany's foreign department, has completed dubbin; 
in Spanish on "Gaslight." The company will dul 
all of its product in Spanish, he said, to compl; 
with the "persistent and growing demand fron 
Spanish-speaking audiences throughout the Westeri 
hemisphere for Spanish sound tracks to replac 
titles. To fulfill this demand, MGM has gathers 
a staff not only of writers and directors but 1 
capable stock company of actors to assure everj 
star on the MGM roster of having his or he 1 
counter-part in a talented Spanish-speaking artis 
with a voice matching in timber, tone, pitch an< 
quality." 

Most of the MGM dubbing, will be done in Ne\ 
York, with some preparations made at the Holly 
wood studios. 

OWI Selects Pictures 

The overseas film division of the Office of Wa 
Information, already has selected several of th 
pictures which the distributors are making avail 
able for future distribution by the OWI to th 
liberated European countries. Each company wi!j 
furnish two pictures dubbed in French and Italiai 

Those selected to date include : "Claudia, 
Twentieth Century-Fox, French; "Shop Aroun 
the Corner" and "Random Harvest," MGM, bot 
in French and Italian ; "Sergeant York," Warner: 
Italian ; "Men in Her Life," Columbia, French an* 
Italian. 

- Si 

Extensive Campaign Precedes 
"Wilson" Opening at Roxy 

An unusual advertising campaign on behalf c, 
Darryl F. Zanuck's Twentieth Century-Fox Tech 
nicolor production, "Wilson," which will have it 
world premiere at the New York Roxy theatr 
August 1, has been set in motion. Two month 
prior to the Roxy engagement, more than 5,00 
window cards and posters of all sizes were dis 
played throughout metropolitan New York, Lon 
Island and New Jersey on billboards, railway an 
subway stations and in street cars and buses. Las; 
week a series of newspaper advertisement begai 
calling attention to the extensive posting job, an 
making them the basis for a newspaper campaigi 



Brauer Promoted to Manager 

Edwin Brauer, Republic salesman for the pa: 
year, has been promoted to Republic branch mar 
ager in Indianapolis. Mr. Brauer previously ws 
with the local Universal exchange for four year 
and with MGM for 10 years previously. 



50 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19' 





zAn international association of shozvmen meeting zveehly 
in MOTION PICTURE HERALD for mutual aid and progress 



CHESTER FRIEDMAN, Editor 



GERTRUDE MERRIAM, Associate Editor 



Little Space Vs. Large Mats 

Chicago theatre managers have been sliced again on previously 
rationed newspaper lineage space for display advertising. 

Last week the Times announced that Loop theatres would here- 
after be restricted to 50 lines per day. Outlying theatres must con- 
fine themselves to five lines daily maximum, ten on Sundays. 

Simultaneously, the Chicago Tribune announced that theatres 
located outside the Loop area would be further limited to eight 
lines daily. 

At present, the outlook indicates that there will be further reduc- 
tions in newspaper advertising space in other sections of the 
country. The situation promises to get worse before any improve- 
ment can be expected. 

Because of their proximity to the scene, the managers are con- 
stantly aware of the problems pertaining to newspaper rationing 
that others may be likely to overlook. 

An analysis of pressbook material indicates that the distributors 
have not yet generally acceded to the trend so far as newspaper 
mats are concerned. 

The abundance of large size mats which are offered to the 
theatres certainly do not fit with the rationing situation. 

Even before the war there were many showmen who believed 
that the distributors concentrated too much effort in the prepara- 
tion of three, four and five column ad snats and overlooked the 
limited budgets of the smaller operations. 

In view of the space limitations and restricted appropriations, it 
would appear that the distributor companies could now render 
service to exhibitors by devoting more attention to ads of small 
design which will fit into the present pattern of advertising. 

AAA 

Bonds and Beards 

E. C. Keenan, manager of the Burns theatre, Newport, Vermont, 
one of the Honored Hundred of Fourth War Loan fame, set out 
to achieve extra distinction for the "Fighting Fifth". 

One of his promotions had to do with auctioning three beards 
representing an assortment of patriotic colors. 

A red beard belonging to the Mayor of Newport, a white beard 
which adorned the face of a prominent citizen, and Keenan's own 
shrub, arbitrarily designated as a "Blue Beard", was the bait. 

Having agreed to refrain from shaving until the city's Bond 
quota had been reached, the triumvirate provided some light 
moments for newspaper readers who were treated to a day-by-day 



account of the Bond and Beard developments. Keenan arranged 
for the Beard Auction to take place at his theatre on the night 
selected for his War Bond premiere, revealing his latent objective. 

Editorial comment was picked up by newspapers and radio com- 
mentators throughout New England and for a climax made wire 
breaks via A. P. and U.P. 

AAA 

Showmanship World 

The advertising campaign currently being conducted in behalf 
of "Wilson", which makes its world bow at the Roxy theatre, 
New York, on August I , has a breath-taking pace by nature of 
its tremendous scope. 

Newspaper and magazine advertising, supported by an unprece- 
dented wave of publicity, has been further augmented by a blanket 
billboard campaign covering the city and environs up to 300 miles 
distant. New York's extensive transportation system is included. 

Eight hundred and twenty spot announcements each week for a 
month previous to the opening provide one of the most compre- 
hensive saturation programs ever attempted through use of radio. 

Hal Home, director of advertising, publicity and exploitation 
for Twentieth Century-Fox, who is responsible for the splurge, can 
also be counted on to provide suitable exploitation materials. 

AAA 

MANAGERS might give more than ordinary attention to a 
mailing piece on "Marine Raiders" which is currently being sent 
to the theatres by Leon J. Bamberger, sales promotion manager 
for RKO Radio Pictures. 

Cleverly devised, after getting over its sales message to the 
exhibitor, the device can be taken apart and used as a set of pen- 
nants to augment lobby displays when the picture is booked. 

AAA 

MANAGER AL SEDGEWICK of the Belsize theatre, Toronto, 
Ontario, did a bit of swift thinking recently when half of his 
marquee letters, which were away being painted, failed to arrive 
in time to put up his next day's attraction. 

Left with D's, B's and with only three N's with which to adver- 
tise Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour in "Dixie" and "That Nazty 
Nuisance", Sedgewick went to work with pencil and pad. 

Thirty minutes and 20 cigarettes later he had a solution and 
up went the sign, reading: "LOOK AT THIS SIGN TOMORROW 
FOR THE TITLE OF THE GREATEST SHOW IN TOWN". 

—CHESTER FRIEDMAN 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



51 



WORLD PREMIERE -CAPITOL TH 



msss. 





ince 




His first picture sin 



Directed bj 



[RE - NEW YORK CITY - JULY 20th 




flD 0. SELZNICK 

presents 




ONE WITH THE WIND" and "REBECCA 

Cromwell • Released thru United Artists 



THEY DON'T STOP FIGHTING I 
KEEP SELLING WAR BONDS FOR VICTORY I 



SEAT SELLING PROMOTIONS 




Manager Irving Trencher of the Gotham theatre, New York, recently secured 
free window space, plugging "It Happened 'Tomorrow", in 127 locations of 
Spotless Stores, one of which is pictured. 




This attractive window display was promoted by manager H. J. Arnold 
to exploit "Lady in the Dark" at the Indiana, Terre Haute. 




"Bernadette" campaign in Des Moines, by Dale McFarland of Tri-States, 
included press, radio promotions, and bus and trolley posters, above, for 
film's engagement at the Paramount. 




Publicist Rita Morton of the Albee, Providencj 
had the Planters Peanut man handing out envelopj 
with copy imprint on "Show Business". 




H 

This inner-lobby display was arranged by Bernard Hy 1$, 
manager of the Denver theatre in Denver, for "Upi™ 
Mabel's Room". 



54 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 




Seorqe McKenna, Lafayette theatre, Buffalo, N. Y., 
obtained this window tiein plugging "Once Upon a 
finne" through Janet Blair's endorsement of Max Fac- 
ror cosmetics. 




Elliot Johnson, advertising manager, Malco theatre, Memphis, designed this 
neat front for booking of "Doctor Wassell". 




is striking shadow box display was used in the lobby of the Fox theatre, Atlanta, 
sy manager Tommy Read as an advance plug for "Follow the Boys". 





At the Strand, Trail, p. C, in Canada, man- 
ager L. V. Campbell utilized RKO's effective 
mailing piece on "Tender Comrade" to con- 
struct this attractive setpiece. 




: _ or recent WAC drive, Alice Gorham, publicity direc- 
;or for United Detroit theatres, Detroit, designed this 
lammoth setpiece in the lobby of the Michigan. 



C. B. King's exploitation for "Buffalo Bill" at the Ritz in McGehee, Ark., included 
display of old time rifles and muskets, cutout atop the marquee, and the street 
banner shown, above. 



MANAGERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY 15, 1944 



55 



MILLIONS ARE WAITING 




STEPHEN SIESINGER. N. Y. 




TUCSON RAIDERS * 
MARSHAL OF RENO 



VIGILANTES OF DODGE CITY 
GREAT STAGECOACH ROBBERY 
SHERIFF OF LAS VEGAS 
LONE TEXAS RANGER] 
SAN ANTONIO KID ] 
CHEYENNE miDCM 



1 




JOIN THE FIGHTING FIFTH WAR LOAN 



PRESOLD TO MILLIONS through: 

Red Ryder Cartoon Strip in over 700 newspapei 
with a combined circulation of 15,000,000! 

The power-packed series of Red Ryder books . . 
5,000,000 currently in circulation! 

Red Ryder comic magazines with a fan followin 
of 3,000,000! 

This tremendous audience is waiting to see Red Ryd 
on the screen! 

Another Scoop Fo 

REPUBLK 

Showmanship 



FOR R edj&fa 

IN A SERIES OF 8 WESTERN DRAMAS 



FROM REPUBLIC 



wad sae setiett 
RED RYDER 

LITTLE BEAVER 

THE DUCHESS 




STEPHEN SIESINGER, N. Y 



Based on Fred Harmon's Famous NEA Comic 
By special arrangement with Stephen Slesinger 



Exploiting the New Films 



How the recent pictures are being sold a 
the first run and pre-release date showing 




Welcome Home 
Jane Powell 

'OUR OWN VICTORY GIRL" 

cr 

JL HIS firm has more 
than a passing interest in 
this loveablo little person- 
It was her qolden voice 
that you heard fust ten 
months back on a Carl 
Greve sponsored radio 
program. At the time Jane 
loft Portland lor Holly- 
wood we offered our con- 
gratulations, predicted a 
great success for her. And 
now Jane Powell with her 
charming personality 
"HAS ARRIVED." 

Once again lane Powell, 
we say, CONGRATULA- 
TIONS, spelled" in capital 
letters. We know coming 
home for your World Pre- 
miere Is going to be a 
thrilling event lot you. We 
wish you could linger 
longer with us, for Carl 
Greve and all Portland is 
deeply proud of your 
achievements. 




; THE SQUARE DEAL JEWELER 
\^^731S.W.MORRISOHJT. 




Jane Powell 

Youthful singirVg star you have heard Sunday 
afternoons ove/ KGW on the Edgar Bergen- 
Charlie McCarthy show, will be a guest jn per- 
son on 

"620 TIME" 

the big, new KGW War Industry-War #Bond 
program from the stage of the Broadway theater, 
where the ^orld premiere showing of Miss Pow- 
ell's picture, "Song of the Open Road," is being 
presented. 

TUNE IN "620 TIME" 
9:30 SUNDAY EVENING 



KGW- 620 



ON YOUR 
DIAL 



Sixteen merchant co-op ads, such as the tloree- column reproduction at left, were obtaim 
by jack Matlack, publicity director, J. J. Parker's Broadway, Portland, Ore., to promo 
world premiere showing of "Song of the Open Road". Right, one of many co-ops he pr 
moted in conjunction with Jane Powell's radio broadcasts also plug film's opening. 



SONG OF THE OPEN ROAD 

Enlisting the aid of newspapers, radio, civic 
groups, the governor of Oregon and the mayor 
of Portland, Jack Matlack, publicity manager 
for the J. J. Parker Broadway theatre, made 
Jane Powell's personal appearance in conjunc- 
tion with the world premiere of "Song of the 
Open Road" an outstanding event in the an- 
nals of promotional advertising. 

Robert Goodfried, of United Artists' New 
York exploitation staff, lent valuable assistance 
through his presence in Portland. 

For three weeks in advance of the picture's 
opening, Matlack scored front page stories 
with art on the Hollywood star's appearance. 
The task was not too difficult when it was re- 
vealed that Miss Powell is a native of Port- 
land and had won previous acclaim as the 
"Oregon Victory Girl." 

The Governor "requested" a command per- 
formance of the film which the local press 
promptly played up with feature stories. Mayor 
Riley of Portland and his staff heads attended 
a private screening of the film after which the 
mayor appointed a world premiere committee 
to work with the theatre publicist. The mayor 
also shined up the key to the city for presenta- 
tion to Miss Powell which was likewise picked 
up by the press. 

One thousand tack cards were placed all 
over the city announcing the world premiere, 
lobby and theatre advertising heralded the pre- 
miere with special tickets for the performance 
going on sale two weeks in advance. The as- 
sociated Parker theatres in Portland displayed 
special trailers and posters announcing the 
opening. 

Matlack planted a full page story in the color 
section of the Oregonian Sunday section, two 
weeks in advance and won theatre credits on 
the page. 

A full two-column feature story with art, 
titled "Jane Is Coming Home," hit the Oregon 
Journal three days before the star's arrival in 
the city. 

Reception for Star Followed 
By "Gasless Parade" 

Matlack lined up a gala reception for the 
young star upon her arrival which was cli- 
maxed by a "gasless parade." Radio station 
KOIN was on hand to broadcast the reception 
and parade. The mayor presented the key and 
a bouquet of Portland roses in the presence of 
a battery of news reporters and photographers. 

An open carriage carried the star and the 
mayor through the main streets of the city ac- 
companied by troopers mounted on horseback, 
boys and girls on bicycles and several bands. 
The gasless parade was the signal for another 
outburst of front-page publicity breaks. 

Matlack arranged for Miss Powell to appear 
at the Portland Victory Center where she sang 
songs from her picture and led a monster Bond 
rally. The Hollywood star also appeared at 
numerous social and civic functions and visited 
her friends and acquaintances accompanied by 
reporters and the photographers. She also sang 
before 22,000 war workers at the Kaiser Ship- 
yards, netting a full-page spread in the Kaiser 
house organ which has a circulation of 150,000. 

Another day was devoted to visiting the Ser- 



vicemen's Center, Portland's U. S. O. canteen 
and the Barnes General Hospital with Miss 
Powell spreading sunshine with her songs 
through the various wards. Another great 
publicity break resulted from the fact that the 
blind soldiers nominated Miss Powell as their 
favorite "pin-up voice." 

The youthful star was made guest of honor 
at Portland's famous Rose Festival and as she 
sang for the Queen of the Festival and 10,000 
distinguished guests, the press turned loose 
with a veritable barrage of news breaks and art 
layouts. 

Tieup Effected with Oregon 
U. S. Crop Corps 

Still another device which brought extra 
publicity to the premiere was the fact that the 
Oregonian U. S. Crop Corps with a member- 
ship of 13,000 boys and girls decided to elect 
Miss Powell as their honorary chairman. 

The Retail Trade Bureau of Portland sent 
out a special bulletin publicizing the premiere 
to all members and 16 of the city's leading 
stores devoted full window displays to the 
event. Each of the cooperating stores bought 
display ads in the local papers welcoming Jane 
to the city with full theatre credits. 

Matlack arranged for Miss Powell to appear 
on a score of locally sponsored broadcasts with 
each sponsor paying for newspaper space to 
advertise her appearance and theatre credits. 

Radio columnists wrote rave reviews on her 



various appearances and devoted whole cc 
umns of space to the personable star. Jane w 
also named guest of honor on station KOIN 
"Million Dollar Club" a half hour sustainii 
program devoted to the sale of War Bonds ai 
dedicated the broadcast to "Song of the Opi 
Road". 

New City Concert Center 
Named for Jane Powell 

With the campaign in full swing, Matla 
put over the piece de resistance. The city 
Portland was ready to dedicate a new conce 
center in one of the principal parks. 

Matlack induced the city council to name t 
center, Jane Powell Concert Center. A res 
lution was drawn and attested by the body ai 
on the appointed day a crowd of 10,000 pe 
sons witnessed Mayor Riley formally dedica 
the section as a perpetual tribute to the ste 
The ceremonies were broadcast coast-wi 
over KOIN. 

A final burst of publicity resulted wh 
Mayor Riley made Miss Powell a present of 
box of Portland earth, so that everywhere s 
goes she will have some of Portland with hi 

Just before the picture opened Miss Pow 
was further honored by being selected as "Ci 
zen of the Week." The Portland Tracti 
Company which sponsors this device herald 
the selection by posting 674 bus cards and 5| 
car cards on the city's entire transportati j 
system. 



58 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, IS 



and even Broadway's product jam 




GOTHAM VICTORIA 

47 th and BROADWAY 46 th and BROADWAY 

3 R . D BIG WEEK 2 N . D BIG* WEEK 

now in our 18 WEST 48 th STREET exchanges in 

NEW HOME OFFICE BRYANT 9 - 0 6 6 0 ALL KEY CITIES 



Foreign Language 
Papers Publicize \ 
Film in Denver 

Supplementary publicity in Italian, Swedis I 
Mexican and German-American newspape 
augmented a fine campaign engineered by Ma 
garet Goyette for the opening of "Hour B 
fore the Dawn" at the Denham theatre in De : 
ver, Col. 

Advance feature stores and art breaks ab 
landed in the local dailies beginning one wet 
in advance. Miss Goyette's advertising car 
paign in the newspapers emphasized "Tl 
Shocking She-Devil Who Sold Herself !", ai 
other angles playing up the sensational side 
the film. 

Radio spot announcements were used in a« 
vance and special announcements were maoi 
over the public address system at the Unive 
sity of Denver stadium during an importa 
A.A.U. meet. Fourteen local book stores us< 
window displays featuring works by W. Sor 
erset Maugham, who wrote the novel "Hoi 
Before Dawn." 

Veronica Lake color posters with picture at j 
theatre credit were spotted at leading drug as 
variety stores, and huge standees, illustratii j 
the individual stars of the attraction, we ! 
placed in the theatre lobby three weeks in a j 
vance. 



Has KDYL— Theatre Newscast 




KDYL war news booth at Salt Lake City's 
Utah theatre, located in a lower-floor box, 
broadcasts latest news flashes to the theatre 
audience each evening at break of the first 
show. 

Seated before a brilliantly lighted battle 
scene, the announcer (Charles Barrington) is 
thrown into deep silhouette when house lights 
are lowered and colored backdrop lights are 



By Bill Shipler 

flooded on the painting behind him. 
Arranged by manager Charles Pincus of the 
Utah theatre, this unusual feature has occa- 
sioned favorable comment from audiences 
and is a definite drawing card. 

News flashes are usually three minutes in 
length and cover all important news of the 
moment. During Invasion period, flashes 
were lengthened at audience demand. 



24-Sheet Atop Marquee 
Sells "Jack London" 

As an eye-attractor ahead of and during the 
run of "Jack London" at the Princess theatre, 
Sioux City, la., William Eagen used a 24- 
sheet atop his marquee featuring a giant cut- 
out of the star as he appears in the picture. 
Above this was the title and a flasher arrange- 
ment spotted lights on and off, so that at one 
time just the figure would be discernible and 
the next the title. An "A" board out front car- 
ried out practically the same idea as the mar- 
quee setpiece. 

Since "Memphis Belle" was on the same 
bill, Eagen got the Army Air Base Band, com- 
posed of 14 top flight musicians, to perform 
on his stage. The stage presentation started 
with the band and then a radio announcer in- 
troduced the local air veterans, who were inter- 
viewed as to their battle experiences. 

McCarthy Ties "Mark Twain" 
To Junior Police Legion 

A tremendous amount of local interest was 
built up with a "Mark Twain" frog jumping 
contest recently when J. F. McCarthy at the 
Strand in Hartford invited all boys' clubs and 
units of the Hartford Junior Police Legion of 
Honor to participate. Training programs were 
arranged on the lawn in front of the Old State 
House in the center of the town and the con- 
test itself was held in one of the biggest parks, 
with the drum corps marching the boys to the 
spot. 

Special arrangements were made for a Hol- 
lywood premiere, with Twain material exhib- 



ited in downtown windows, which tied in with 
his local residence. The Mark Twain Memorial 
was contacted for valuable publicity, and the 
schools were furnished with stills for use on 
bulletin boards. Libraries were similarly 
equipped and book stores came through with 
effective window and counter displays. 

Taylor Lands Tieup Ad 
In Three Local Papers 

Despite space restrictions, Charles B. Tay- 
lor, advertising manager of Shea's Theatres, 
Buffalo, for his date on "Broadway Rhythm" 
promoted a 32-inch tieup ad in three of the lo- 
cal papers. The ad featured Nancy Walker 
and Ben Blue in a scene from the picture, and 
Taylor says it is the first time that a tieup ad 
ran in all three local papers at the same time 
on one picture. 

The music angle was also sold heavily with 
Columbia representatives placing hundreds of 
window streamers in record stores and juke 
box dealers placing stickers on machines in 
the community. News trucks carried copy, a 
transportation tieup brought cards on busses 
coming into the city urging passengers to see 
the picture, and local night spots were supplied 
with imprinted coasters. 



Longo Uses News Cards 

To open "Gaslight" at Loew's State and Or- 
pheum in Boston, Joe Longo distributed 500 
cards to newsstands, subway stands, etc. plug- 
ging the attraction. In addition oilcloth ban- 
ners were prepared which were used on 16 
fleet trucks in advance of the date. 



Perkins Features 
Revival Week 

To help sell his revival week at the Ri| 
theatre in Lyndhurst, N. J., Dave Perkins ti<! 
up all his advertising with copy, "Dr. Ritz Pr 
scribes," "Dr. Ritz Revives," etc. Since Da- 
was unable to obtain a ballyhoo man, his a 
sistant, Robert Tofneld, stepped into the brea< 
and donned a false beard and drooping mu 
tache and dressed all in white in an interne 
outfit, distributed "prescription blanks." 

Utilizing a number of pocketbooks whii 
had been lost and not claimed at the theatr 
Perkins stuffed them with cards reading : " 
lost, return to Dr. Ritz and receive a reward |i 
This was followed by the theatre address, ail 
the reward was a pass. 



Mayor Presents Cugat 
With Proclamation 

For the week's engagement of Xavier Cugtl 
at the RKO Palace, Cleveland, Lou Mayer a 
ranged for Mayor Frank J. Lausche to prese 
the maestro with a proclamation at the Ci 
Hall. This was good for newspaper art ai 
stories. Window displays were promoted fro 
local record dealers and radio coverage lande 

The highlight of the campaign was whe 
Cugat drew a caricature of a prominent Clev 
land manufacturer in the lobby of the theatr 
His fee for the drawing was the purchase of 1 
$50,000 Bond. This was broadcast from tl' 
lobby over WHK. 



King's Teaser Slant 

As an eye-arrestor and teaser gag ahead 
"Harvest Moon" at the Ritz theatre, McGehe 
Ark., C. B. King tacked cards on parked ca 
with copy reading: "This car is not for sal 
The owner will need it to bring him to s<5 
Ann Sheridan in," etc. This was followed 1 
title and playdates. One-sheets were posted ( 
the side of the theatre and on the sidewalk 
front of the house. In addition, scene ma! 
were used in the local paper at no cost. 



60 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19 



ERSON ALS 



la New Posts: Marion Meyers, Band Box, 
{uladelphia. John Redmond, division manager, 
[pervising the Mort Singer theatres in the 
nicago area taken over by RKO. Frank Smith, 
s-ision manager RKO theatres in Chicago, Cham- 
Jign, Kansas City, Des Moines and St. Paul. 
Jarry Schreiber. assistant division manager for 
|s.O in the Chicago area. Ray Smith, Canton, 
ir.ton. Ga. Emmett Grimalen, city manager, Mar- 
i Theatres. Monroe, Ga. Harold Teel, Uptown, 
|stroit, Mich. W. S. Samuel, Ruffin, Covington, 
pin. 

Assistant Managers: Xick Mihut, Michigan, 
stroit. E. W. Emerson, RKO Grand, Chicago. 

Happy Birthday: DeWitt Haley, Morrie G. 
immer, Lawrence Clearv, Sid Shane, Charles 
andolph, Thomas W. Hagen, H. E. Kelly, J. D. 
□tinstone, Harry Gray, Redick McC. Hamer, 
eslie \Y. Pendleton, John T. Leverette, Byron 

cElligott, Harvey Kuhn, A. E. Post, Ed Church. 
Kin R. Scott, Louis A. Schaefer. Lloyd Bridg- 

m, Edmond Zetzsche, Edd J. Haas. 

Lester Booth, Frank P. Collins, Charles K. 
t>ng, Joseph McGonagle, Richard M. Mills, 
arold E. Elley, John Xahalka, C. J. Remington, 
arry Karasik. Abe Wasserman, Andy M. Sam- 

b, J. H. Ross, E. D. Ardavany, Bert Rhon- 

imer, G. O. Lea, Frank Lewis, Wallace J. 
jtler, Conrad Shunway, Joseph Forster, Hamil- 
n Kupper, Marty Finger, VV. F. Harris. 

Russell W. Barrett, W. A. Johannsen, Ken- 
fth K. King. William Goodman, Albert Colagio- 
|nni, Nat Rothstein, J. J. McCarthy, Leon Stern- 

rger, Sam L. Handler, William J. Tubbert. 
sn Prickett, Jack Bright, Paul Butterfield. 

Showmen's Dates: August 1st, Start of World 
ar No. 1 — 1914 ; Colorado Admitted to Union 
76. 10th. Missouri Admitted to Union 1821. 
'th. Patents for sewing machines granted I. M. 
nger and A. B. Wilson 1851. 15th, Panama Canal 
pened 1914 : Sir Walter Scott, poet, Born 1771 ; 
apoleon Bonaparte Born 1769. 17th, First Atlan- 
: Cable message sent 1858 ; Discovery Day — 
ukon territory ; Fulton invented first steamboat 
K)7. 

Junior Showmen: John Carroll to Mr. & Mrs. 
. B. Graver. The dad is manager of the Visulite 
id Plaza theatres, Charlotte. N. C. Polly Ann, 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Pickett. Jr. The father is 
oker and buyer for the S. W. Craver circuit 

Charlotte. X. C. 



+ar Spangled Banner 
vids Bond Sales 

An effective stunt used by E. R. Bren- 
in at the Bay theatre, Green Bay, Wis., is 
at when the War Bond trailer is over, he 
Hows it with the Star-Spangled Banner and 
en the lights are turned out and a spot put 
l the American Flag on stage. Then over 
e p.a. system, "The Unknown Soldier," which 
printed on the backs of the pledge cards, was 
cited over the back-stage mike by the high 
hool faculty speech teacher. The lights were 
en turned up and a spiel for the purchase of 
onds was given. 

'olds Junior Bond Rally 

Another activity engaged in by Brennan was 
Junior Bond Salesmen Rally at which time 
lildren were inducted. To each child promis- 
lg to buy or sell one W T ar Bond during the 
ive a guest ticket was awarded. Local mer- 
lants came through with a co-operative ad 
td block workers all received letters urging 
em to have their prospects purchase their 
onds at the Motion Picture War Bond Store, 
exchange for which each would receive a 
lest ticket and a Fifth War Loan button. 




Eddie Snider-man, former district manager for RKO theatres, N. Y.; John W. Godfroy, assist- 
ant, Loew's, Louisville; George Delis, district manager, Constant circuit, visit Round Table. 



still mnKins 



RECORDS EUERVUJHERE! 





f^uJsIjin 1/aleniins in 

SON OF THE SHEIK 



THE GREATEST LOVE SENSATION OF ALL TIMES! 

Packing 'em in from coast to coast with S-M-A-S-H after 
S-M-A-S-H openings: Women cry, beg, plead to see it 
again! Critics rave— "Valentino still unequalled!" Now is 
the time to cash in on this torrid hit! Contact your local 
exchanges immediately for house-packing bookings. 




Represented b/ 
ALBERT DEZEL ROADSHOWS 

2310 Cass, Detroit • 1325 S. Wabash, Chicago • 21st and Payne. Cleveland 
ROADSHOW ATTRACTION SAM SILVERMAN 

257 H. 13th St., Philadelphia, Penna. 3533 Virginia, Kansas City, Mo. 



A Few Valuable Franchises Stilt Open... Write... Wire or Telephone 
HERB ELISBURG • 66 E. Van Buren, CHICAGO 



ANAGERS' ROUND TABLE, JULY 15, 1944 



61 



IN HEWSREEL 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Ten cents per word, money-order or check with copy. Count initials, box number and ad- 
dress. Minimum insertion, $1. Four insertions, for the price of three. Contract rates on 
■■■^(Mcafion No borders 01 cuts. Forms dm& M©fkU^< <si E> P, K4, Publisher reserves 
the right to reject any copy. Film and trailer advertising not accepted. Class!- i^^™ 
-••rtising not subject to agency eomminicn. Address copy and checks: I 1 1 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD, Classified Dept., Rockefeller Center, New York (20) Wtm 



THEATRES 



THEATRE WANTED— $25,000 TO 1 $50,000 FOR THE- 
atre in town over 30,000 population in Illinois, Indiana, 
Wisconsin. Deal with principal. Give full details. Con- 
fidential. BOX 1754, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



FO'R SALE IN FULL OPERATION THEATRE ON 
Oregon coast, highway town. BOX 1756, MOTION PIC- 
TURE HERALD. 



VENTILATING EQUIPMENT 



FACTORY SHIPMENT— NEW BLOWERS AVAIL - 
able — prompt delivery — Mark your order AA5 Priority 
MRO (Maintenance, Repair or Operation), priced less 
motor. 5,500 cfm, $75; 8,500 cfm, $99.75; 11.000 cfm, 
$119.50; 13,500 cfm, $149.50; 22,500 cfm, $199.50; 27,500 cfm, 
$234.50. Rebuilt motors furnished at lowest market prices. 
Air washers also available for replacements with present 
equipment. Used spray nozzles, $1.25; rebuilt typhoon 
exhaust fans, 24", $111; 30", $132; 36", $151.20. Office 
cooler. % ton 110 DC, used $175. S. O. S. CINEMA 
SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 



AMERICAN BLOWER (SIROCCO 1 #108), DOUBLE 
width — double inlet. Discharge size 66"x48"; air handle up 
to 50,000 cubic feet per minute; equipped with Horton 
hydraulic variable speed drive pulley — no motor. Used 
two years, perfect condition. BEN J. BANOWITZ, 1325 
S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS 



THEATRE EMPLOYEES; TRAIN FOR BETTER 
position. 'Learn modern theatre management and adver- 
tising. Big opportunity for trained men. Established since 
1927. Write now for free catalog. THEATRE MANAGERS 
SCHOOL, Elmira, New York. 



BOOKS 



RICHARDSON'S BLUEBOOK OF PROJECTION. 
Best seller since 1911. Now in 7th edition. Revised to 
present last word in Sound Trouble Shooting Charts. Ex- 
pert information on all phases of projection and equipment. 
Special new section on television. Invaluable to beginner 
and expert. $7.25 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 



MOTION PICTURE SOUND ENGINEERING. A 
"must" to all those working with sound equipment. Writ- 
ten by top-flight engineering experts of Hollywood studios 
and research laboratories. Covers all phases of sound 
engineering and equipment. Readable diagrams; charts, 
tables and graphs. $6.50, postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOK- 
SHOP, 1270 Sixth Avenue, New- York 20. 



AIR CONDITIONING, WHETHER YOUR THEATRE 
has 300 or 3,000 seats, this book has all the answers on 
air conditioning. Explains various codes and laws, con- 
cerning installation. Common sense charts. Indexed. Covers 
air conditioning as it relates to all branches of film indus- 
try. $4, postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 Sixth Ave- 
nue, New York 20. 



SOUND-TROUBLE SHOOTING CHARTS. THE LIT- 
tle book, with the blue cover all good operators reach for 
when trouble starts. Will clear up that "puzzler" on all 
types of sound equipment in a jiffy. No booth complete 
without one, $1.00 postpaid. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 
Sixth Avenue, New York 20. 



BOOKKEEPING SYSTEM 



THEATRE MANAGEMENT RECORD AND TAX 
Register. A book that takes the headache out of theatre 
accounting. Covers every detail of accounting in theatre 
operation. Makes keeping of up-to-the-minute records a 
pleasure. Attractive leather cover with gold stamping. $2 
now if you order fast. QUIGLEY BOOKSHOP, 1270 Sixth 
Avenue, New York 20. 



. STUDIO EQUIPMENT 



AMERICAN 35MM CONTINUOUS PRINTER. TABLE 
model, fairly complete, $89.50; underwriters approved film 
vaults, 9 sections, complete $45; Akeley 32V DC camera 
motor, $29.50; Berndt-Maurer 16mm recording system, 
$1,995. Write for lists. S. O. S. CINEMA SUPPLY 
CORP., New York 18. 



USED EQUIPMENT 



WPB RULES PRACTICALLY NO' NEW CHAIRS 
available next six months — buy these now — 300 American 
rebuilt fully upholstered velour back, box spring cushion 
chairs, metal lined, like new, $10.50; 386 Stafford heavy 
inserted panel back, box spring cushion chairs, $6.50 
rebuilt, reupholstered; 252 Grand Rapids ball bearing 
inserted panel back, box spring cushion chairs, $4.50 good 
condition; 700 red twill slip covers for back, 49? each, 
good condition. Leatherette (rolls approximately 60 yards) 
50" wide, red, $1.52; other colors, $1.41 (10% more for 
smaller lengths). Wire now S. 0<. S. CINEMA SUPPLY 
CORP., New York 18. 



ADVANCE FRENCH FRY POPCORN MACHINE, 
overhauled, needs painting, $89.50; silver screen curtains, 
pair, $10; Army surplus 40/80 ampere generators, $95". 
booth equipment available. Powers, Simplex projectors, 
lamphouses. soundheads, motors, amplifiers, etc. Send for 
special bulletins. S. O. Sv CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., 
New York 18. 



NEW EQUIPMENT 



2CW FILM CABINETS, $2.93 SECTION; FILM 
splicers, $5.25; ideal rechargeable flashlight batteries $2.20; 
ushers' flashlights, $1.39; drinking fountain bubblers, $9.95; 
fifteen ampere rectifier bulbs, $6.95; jewelled aisle lights, 
$2.97; black velourette masking, 79<{ yard; steel core 
curtain cable. 12J4# ft. Bargain Bulletin mailed. S. O. S. 
CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., New York 18. 



SIGN PAINTING 



SIGN PAINTING. EASY WAY TO PAINT SIGNS. 
Use letter patterns. Avoid sloppy work, wasted time. No 
experience needed for expert work. Free sample. JOHN 
RAHN, 1329 Central Ave., Chicago, 51, 



BUSINESS BOOSTERS 



BINGO CARDS, DIE CUT, 1 TO 100 OR 1 TO 75, $2.25 
per thousand, $20.00 for 10,000. S. KLOUS, care of MO- 
TION PICTURE HERALD. 



PRINTING SERVICE 



THEATRE BLOWUPS. GOOD QUALITY. SERVICE. 
STITES PORTRAIT CO., Shelby ville, Ind. 



RENTAL SERVICE 



FILM AND EQUIPMENT RENTAL — 16MM WITH 
sound history of War since 1939. Complete invasion shots, 
Austria, Poland, France, including Normandy, etc. Also 
Bell & Howell sound projection equipment. EMBRO 
PICTURES, WESTERN STATES DISTRIBUTORS FOR 
W-I FILMS, 2438 North Beachwood, Hollywood 28, Cal. 
Telephone Hempstead 1702. 



POSITIONS WANTED 



OPERATOR — 17 YEARS' EXPERIENCE. Al REF- 
erences. Ready to go anywhere. JOHN HILL, Scioto- 
ville, 0'. 



PROJECTIONIST. TWENTY YEARS' EXPERIENCE, 
draft exempt, single, sober, reliable, go anywhere. Save 
time, state your best and working conditions. PRO- 
JECTIONIST, Princeton Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind. 



MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 26, No. 89— The capture 
Cherbourg . . . Dewey back in Albany . . . Last Liberi 
ship launched . . . Denison Dam dedicated . . . Shutt 
bombing from Italy to Russian base. 

MOVIETONE NEWS— Vol. 26., No. 90— Engineers cleJ 
up behind the Allied advance in France. . . . Gener 
DeGaulle in U. S. to confer with President. . . . Dew< 
family at home. . . . Vice-President Wallace in Chin 
greeted by Chiang Kai Shek. . . . Roxyettes go in f< 
tailored blouses for rehearsal. . . . Penicillin, mirac 
drug of the war, produced in Canada. . . . Robot plai 
sites. . . . Rocket guns in action on the Russian fron 

NEWS OF THE DAY— Vol. 15, No. 287— Capture of Che 
bourg. . . . Russians hail first Yank shuttle bombe 
from Italy. . . . S. S. Benjamin Warner launched, i 

NEWS OF THE DAY— Vol. 15, No. 288^-DeGaulle I 
U. S., receives ovation. . . . Nazi army on run j 
Russia, shown in seized German films. . . Capture 
robot bomb ramp, believed aimed at America. . . I 
Americans clear trail of destruction in France. . . ! 
Wallace back from China; film story of epic trip. . . 
Home coming for Dewey. . . . "Last Furlough:" Fil 
Bulletin No. 21. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 90— Campaign report: Dev 
ey's first round. . . . Launch last Liberty ship. . .! 
Circus disaster. . . . First pictures of Cherbourg. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 91— Campaign warms u; 
Dewey holds open house. . . . Democrats map stratej 
.... Vice-President Wallace returns. . . . DeGaulle a 
rives in U. S. . . . Rome, the Nazis' last hours. . . 
Bomber girls. . . . War Bulletin No. 21: "Last Fu 
lough." 

RKO PATHE NEWS— Vol. IS, No. 92— First shuttle ra; 
to Russia bases. . . . Launch the S. S. Benjamin Warn. 
.... Capture of Cherbourg. 

RKO PATHE NEWS— Vol. 15, No. 93— General DeGau 
visits F.D.R. in Washington. . . . Rocket firing plan 
hit Nazis. . . . Dewey family poses for pictures. . J 
Vice-President Wallace visits China. . . . Open intej 
national money parley. . . . Nazi Rome retreat. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEI Vol. 17, No. 309— The ca 

ture of Cherbourg. . . . Yank shuttle bombing. . .1 
S. S. "Benjamin Warner.". . . Dewey family portraij 
. . . Liberation ceremonies. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSREEI Vol. 17, No. 310— The wrec 

age at Cherbourg. . . . Allied plane rockets. . . . D 
Gaulle in America. . . . Buzz bombs — Target U.S.A.? 
Pre -convention huddle. . . . Supplies by air. . . . Dew 
—country gentleman. . . . Berlin evacuees. . . . Walla 
in China. . . . Mystery plane. . . . Gramp at beau: 
contest. 

ALL AMERICAN NEWS— Vol. 2, No. 90— Mexico eel 
brates its independence. . . . French and Colonials tra 
here, then off to war. . . . How milady will wear h 
hair. . . . Name Negro assistant attorney general 
New York. . . . CIO' women workers visit Ft. Knox. . 
Crippled children buy Army ambulance. . . . Negro 
hold freedom rally in New York. . . . Allied troops ta 
Elba. 



Warners Give Equipment 
To Liberty Ship Crew 

Complete 16mm sound projection equipment ai 
prints of five outstanding Warner pictures ha- 
been presented officers and crew of the S.S. Be 1 
jamin Warner as a gift from Harry M. and Ja> 
L. Warner. The films- included "Action in t 
North Atlantic." 'Watch on the Rhine," "Adven- 
tures of Mark Twain," "Casablanca" and "Prince 
O'Rourke." The new Liberty Ship was nam* 
after the father of the Warner Brothers. 



Captain Mentlik Missing 

Captain Lewis S. Mentlik, former New Yoji 
editorial representative of Jay Emanuel Public ' 
tions, has been reported missing in action sin j 
June 14. He was with the 101st Airborne Infa 
try Division, spearheading the invasion of Franc 
Captain Mentlik graduated from Wisconsin Ur 
versity and joined Jay Emanuel in 1938. He e 
tered the army in 1941 and in 1942 married Hel 
Vandel. 



"Angels Sing" at Paramount 

With Betty Hutton, Dorothy Lamour and Fry 
MacMurray as its top trio, "And^ the Ange 
Sing" opened in New York July 12 at the Par 
mount theatre. 



Plays Open in Louisville 

The Iroquois Ampitheatre, at Louisville, Ki 
opened for the season July 3, with "The Stude 
Prince," scaled at 50 cents to $2. The project her 
tofore has offered appreciable competition 
theatres there. 



62 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 19 




SHOWMEN'S REVIEWS 
SHORT SUBJECTS 
ADVANCE SYNOPSES 
SHORT SUBJECTS CHART 



SERVICE DATA 

THE RELEASE CHART 

Thii department dealt with 
new product from the point of 
view of the exhibitor who is 
to purvey it to hit own public. 




Mr. Winkle Goes to War 

Columbia — Soldiers Over 38 

The trials and tribulations of the average G. I. 
lave been exploited in almost every fashion, but it 
■emained for Columbia to present the effects of 
amy life on the older selectee — in this case Edward 
j Robinson as a man of 44, drafted before the 
idoption of the "over 38" regulations. 

The picture has novelty, charm and special appeal 
■or women. The story, by Waldo Ualt, George 
Zorey and Louis Solomon, from the novel by Theo- 
lore Pratt, is a touching and tender little tale about 
i bank clerk who gives up his job, determined to 
>pen a "fixit" shop. This meets with opposition 
rom his wife, portrayed with acidity by Ruth 
.Varrick, but abetted by an orphan boy, he holds to 
ai s decision. Just as the new venture is launched, 
ie is drafted. 

From there, the story takes up his adventures in 
amp, and later an episode of actual combat during 
vhich the central character repairs a bulldozer 
ander Japanese fire, and drives it into an enemy 
nachine gun nest. When he recovers aboard a hos- 
pital ship, he discovers he is a hero. The home 
■own turns out to do him honor, and his wife, con- 
■inced by the orphan boy that her husband's hap- 
)iness lies in the "fixit" shop, gives her consent. 

Ted Donaldson is engaging as the orphan boy, 
ind Bob Haynes has one effective song number, 
rhe musical score by Carmen Dragon and Paul 
Bawtell is particularly felicitious. Alfred E. Green's 
lirection makes the most of the story values and 
he cast is excellent. Jack Moss produced. 

Previewed at the studio. Reviewer's Rating : 
*ood. — Thalia Bell. 

Release date, August 3, 1944. Running time, 77 min. PCA 
Jo. 10032. General audience classification. 

•Ir. Winkle Edward G. Robinson 

drs. Winkle Ruth Warrick 

ed Donaldson, Bob Haymes, Richard Lane, Robert Arm- 
trong, Richard Gaines. 



rake It or Leave It 

Twentieth Century -Fox 
:xperiment in Secondaries 

Producer Bryan Foy, who used to go to the 
lewspaper headlines for his subjects and got fam- 
■U3 that way, went to the storage vaults for this 
ne and came back with a dozen or more sequences 
rom old pictures that still look and sound pretty 
ood. Then he wrapped those up in a camera- 
ecording of Phil Baker doing one of his broad- 
asts for Eversharp — referred to but not spelled 
ut on the screen. After braiding in a small story 
bout a sailor whose wife is having labor pains in 
he audience while he tries for not one but several 
4-dollar questions, he stuck the name of the Bak- 
r air-show on the compilation for a title. 

The enterprise is, at minimum, a triumph in 
conomy of budget, and at maximum it's the sig- 
nal for a cycle of similar films from the storage 
aults of other studios. 

In any case, it's an experiment in secondaries — 
ince it isn't in the cards to offer at scale admission 
rices and singly a film that's eighty per cent 
Idie — and the vote on the usefulness as such is 

lOTION PICTURE HERALD, JULY 15, 1944 



FILM CLASSICS REISSUES 

Film Classics will release 12 of the 31 pic- 
tures acquired from Samuel Goldwyn for re- 
release starting July 15. The first of the 
group will be "Dead End". The list and the 
release dates follow: 

Title Release Date 

Dead End July 15, 1944 

Kid from Spain August 15, 1944 

The Cowboy and the Lady September 15, 1944 

Bulldog Drummond October 15, 1944 

We Live Again November 15, 1944 

Wuthering Heights December 15, !944 

Kid Millions January 15, 1945 

One Heavenly Night February 15, 1945 

Barbary Coast March 15, 1945 

Arrowsmith April 15, 1945 

Goldwyn Follies May 15, 1945 

They Shall Have Music June 15, 1945 

Details regarding the pictures will be found 
in the Release Chart of the Product Digest 
Section. 



not in, although it did all right in front of a 
preview audience that saw it without paying. 

In the first five minutes or less a sailor arrives 
in port, discovers his wife wants an expensive 
doctor to deliver her baby— due any minute now — 
and goes on the Baker program in hope of earn- 
ing some money to pay him. Baker sets him to 
identifying sequences from old pictures, projected 
on a screen in the broadcasting station, and about 
a dozen of these, separated by spurts of dialogue 
between Baker and the sailor, are run off. In the 
remaining five minutes or so of running time, the 
sailor's wife leaves in a hurry for the hospital, 
where she gives birth the same way, and that's 
that. 

Some of the types of interest that makes the 
Baker show a radio attraction accrues likewise to 
the screening of the old sequences, in which Alice 
Faye, Betty Grable and other stars appear. Mr. 
Foy chose musicals principally in his delvings. It 
would be a stretch of ethics to flaunt the names 
of these from a marquee, and the only exploitable 
names in the cast are Phil Baker's and Phil Sil- 
vers', the latter appearing for a minute or less at 
opening of the picture. 

The credit title says Benjamin Stoloff directed 
the picture and that the script was written by three 
persons— Harold Buchman, Snag Werris and Mac 
Benoff — all of whom, in common with Mr. Foy, 
owe bows to the several producers, directors and 
writers who turned out the pictures this one's made 
up of. 

Previewed at the Egyptian theatre, Hollywood, 
where an unnotified audience present to see "The 
White Cliffs of Dover" got a lot of chuckles and 
some laughs out of this free addition to the pro- 
gram. Reviewer's Rating : Maybe. — William R. 
Weaver. 

Release date, not set. Running time, 72 min. PCA 
No. 10088. General audience classification. 

Phil Baker Himself 

Phil Silvers, Edward Ryan, Marjorie Massow, Stanley 
Prasrer. Roy Gordon . Nana Brvant. Carleton Younc Ann 
Corcoran, Nella Walker, Renie Riano. 



Dixie Jamboree 

PRC — Comedy with Songs 

It's the names to bill with and the things their 
bearers do individually that give this comedy- 
with-songs a usefulness beyond common. The 
film sags in spots and meanders some, but unique- 
ness of setting— it happens aboard a Mississippi 
River showboat in the present time — is an offset 
to this, and the corn that's in the medicine-show 
staged on the craft 4s plainly labelled corn so 
that none may mistake the intent. 

Frances Langford as the star of the showboat 
troupe handles her songs, particularly "If It's a 
Dream," with the competency to which her fol- 
lowers are accustomed, and Eddie Quillan gets 
away with a portrayal of a balmy trumpeter in 
satisfactory fashion. Guy Kibbee and Charles 
Butterworth shoulder the burden of the comedy, 
which requires a crowded auditorium to click. 

Jack Schwarz produced the picture, which is 
his best, with Harry D. Edwards as associate 
and with Christy Cabanne directing from a screen- 
play by Sam Neuman based on a story by Law- 
rence E. Taylor. Neuman also collaborated with 
Michael Breen on the five songs which punctuate 
the proceedings to advantage. 

Previewed in studio projection room. Review- 
er's Rating : Fair. — William R. Weaver. 

Release date, not set. Running time, 72 mins. PCA 
No. 9880. General audience classification. 

Susan Jackson Frances Langford 

Captain Jackson Guy Kibbee 

Eddie Quillan, .Charles Butterworth, Fifi D'Orsay, Lyle 
Talbot. Frank Tenks. Elmira Session?. Toe Devlin. T.ou- 
ise Beavers. Ben Carter Gloria Tetter. Edward Shat- 
tuck, Ethel Shattuck, Tony Warde, Angel Cruz. 

Valley of Vengeance 

PRC— Western 

Buster Crabbe and Al (Fuzzy) St. John bring 
their usual brand of fisticuffs and fun-making to 
the screen in_ this Sigmund Neufeld production, 
which is a satisfactory standard Western. 

The story, by Joseph O'Donnell, is told in part 
through the use of flashback, a device not com- 
mon for this type of drama. Buster and Fuzzy, 
separated years before when a wagon train with 
which their families were traveling West was de- 
stroyed by a band of renegades, meet by chance. 
They join forces to find and punish the perpetra- 
tors of the past crime. Aided by Evelyn Finley, as 
secretary of the town banker, they discover that 
the banker set the massacre in motion in order to 
obtain the lands which rightfully belonged to 
the pioneers. The two cowboys place the facts 
before the marshal, and the banker, together with 
his henchmen, pays for his misdeeds. 

Direction is by Sam Newfield. 

Previewed at Hollywood's Hitching Post thea- 
tre, where a matinee audience displayed enthusi- 
asm. Reviewer's Rating: Good. — T. B. 

Release date, May 5, 1944. Running time, 56 min. PCA 
No. 10048. General audience classification. 

Billy Carson Buster Crabbe 

Fuzzy Jones Al (Fuzzy) St. John 

Helen Evelyn Finley a 

Young Billy Donald Mayo 

Young Fuzzy David Polonsky 

Glenn Strange, Charles King, John Merton, Lynton 
Brent, Jack Ingram, Bud Osborne, Nora Bush, Steve 
Clark. 

1993 



SHORT SUBJECTS 

reviews and synopses 



Reviews and synopses of short subjects print* 
in Product Digest are Indexed In the Snort Sal 

jects Chart, Product Digest Sect/on, pages 7996 
1997. 

Running times are those furnished by fho dlt 
tribator. 



AMERICANS ALL (March of Time) 

Dramatic Unity Plea 

This is an attempt to put into a picture argument, 
and therefore more forcefully, what our liberals 
have been saying in other media for some years, 
and increasingly in the past months, as signs of dis- 
unity multiply: that this country is an amalgam, 
and that when one minority is attacked, all others 
become unsafe. As such, it is a good attempt and a 
good device. The exhibitor may bear in mind the 
character of his audience in planning exploitation 
for this subject. Shown are the signs of disunity: 
the desecration of synagogues and churches, the 
rabble rousers, the Jim Crow system. Shown also 
are the attempts at alleviation, and cure : the meet- 
ings of the National Conference of Christians and 
Jews, the lectures to soldiers, the liberal southern 
editors ; and finally, the so-called "Springfield Plan," 
the teaching of tolerance in the Springfield, Mass., 
school system a plan, which the film indicates, is 
spreading. — F. E. S. 

Release date, July 14, 1944 17 minutes 

THE LIBERATION OF ROME (WAC-MGM) 

War Department Report 

A soldier's progress from Sicily to Rome, this 
might also be titled ; for, photographed by camera- 
men of the British Eighth and the American Fifth 
armies, this has the soldier's eye-view of the tre- 
mendously difficult and at times discouraging 
campaign which freed Rome June 4. The scenes 
are mostly "front-line" ; there are others photo- 
graphed by Germans, and by Italian anti-Fascists ; 
all show the harshness of fighting and terrain, 
and include the events at Salerno, Messina, Cas- 
sino, Anzio, and the entrance into Rome. The edit- 
ing makes of this, with some maps, a short sum- 
mary which gives the spectator an adequate grasp 
of what was in effect a whole campaign. The 
narration is objective; it is always the camera 
which speaks. The general effect is grim, but 
thought-provoking. — F. E. S. 
Release date, July 13, 1944 20 minutes 

SPEED COURIERS (Para) 

On Homing Pigeons (R3-&) 

In this short homing pigeons are shown in the 
service of their country in time of national emer- 
gency. Tens of thousands of the birds are seen 
being trained by the Army Signal Corps for use 
on every fighting front. They are attached to the 
Artillery on the fighting front and with the armed 
vehicle forces. An interesting, and timely, se- 
quence shows the pigeons on amphibious landing 
invasion. They substitute for radio communication 
when silent messages must be sent. As example, 
they jump with paratroopers and are then used 
to report landing positions. 

Release date, June 9, 1944 9 l / 2 minutes 

SPEAKING OF ANIMALS— IN A HAREM 
(Para) 

Second of the Series 

In this second subject in the Speaking of Ani- 
mals series, Jerry Fairbanks, the producer, has 
his animals speak dialogue — dubbed, no doubt — 
in a regular continuity. The setting is a typical 
harem scene with dancing girls, slaves, harem 
comics and a sultan, with all the parts played 
by dogs. It is something of a canine burlesque and 
is designed, largely, for laughs. 
Release date, July 14, 1944 . 9y 2 minutes 

LULU IN HOLLYWOOD (Para) 

Technicolor Cartoon (D3-4) 

Little Lulu, with lollypops and slicker, makes 
for Hollywood, for glamor and a screen contract, 

1994 



when follows the usual buildup of star material, 
and Lulu, glamorized and photographed, is screen 
tested, and when directed to portray all the basic 
emotions, fear, horror, joy, tragedy, etc., she re- 
sponds with one deadpan expression, which is 
hailed as terrific histrionisms. A starring role fol- 
lows, and so does acclaim. 

Release date, May 16, 1944 iy 2 minutes 

THE ANVIL CHORUS GIRL (Para) 

Popeye and Bluto (£3-4) 

Olive Oyl is a lady blacksmith in this latest of 
the Popeye series, and she intrigues Popeye and 
Bluto, who are on shore leave. They provide her 
with help, and the subject with gags and action. 
The two, Popeye and Bluto, compete for the honor 
of being first assistant to the female smithy, each 
trying to top the other with feats of strength. In 
a surprise finish Bluto wins out as the strong man, 
but it is Popeye who gets Olive Oyl. 
Release date, July 7, 1944 10 minutes 

CATCH 'EM AND EAT 'EM (Para) 

Sportlight (R3-9) 

The Sportlight opens with a novelty number 
off Pismo Beach, California, with girls and their 
G. I. friends digging in the sands for the large 



Pismo clams. The results of the catch are bake 
over a surf-side fire. Then two American young 
sters are seen hunting frogs with a jacklighl 
among the lily pads of a dark pond. There ar 
more outdoor cullinary scenes with the frying o 
frog legs over a camp fire. In the next scene, wit! 
gastronomies again the goal, Marines, men an< 
women, hunt oysters at New River, North Caro 
lina. A couple on a surfboard hunt the elusiv 
abalone along the Pacific Coast and the reel i 
concluded with a Western barbecue, honest t 
heaven steaks broiled over a charcoal fire. 
Release date, Jidy.7, 1944 10 minute 

UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS, NO. 5 (Para) 

Latest of the Series 

This latest of the Unusual Occupational serie! 
produces diverse sequences, the first an amuse 
ment center where parents are not admitted un 
less accompanied by their children, at the Bron 
Zoo, New York. Another has to do with Carlo 
Diniz, son of a Brazilian consul, who make 
miniature guns. Another is a woman who make 
snoods for horses, and still another a pair, a ma 
and his daughter, who make self-illuminatin 
portraits from bits of broken mirrors. The fin 
sequence depicts the training of our ski-trooper 
10,000 feet above sea level. 
Release date, June 23, 1944 10 minute 



ADVANCE SYNOPSES 

and information 



FLAME OF BARBARY COAST 
(Republic) 

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER AND DIREC- 
TOR: Joseph Kane. PLAYERS: John Wayne, 
Ann Dvorak, Joseph Schildkraut, Helen Vinson, 
Butterfly McQueen, Paul Fix, Russell Hicks, 
Robert Emmett Keane. 

HISTORICAL MELODRAMA. A Montana 
rancher goes to San Francisco, where he falls in 
love with a dancer who is the sweetheart of a 
gambler and dancehall entrepreneur. With the 
help of the girl, the rancher learns to gamble and 
soon wins enough to build an establishment of his 
own. On the night the show opens, starring the 
girl whom he has stolen from the opposition, the 
earthquake of 1906 occurs. The girl is injured and 
discovers that she really loves the rancher. Under 
her influence he reforms and helps to rebuild 
the city. 



LITTLE DEVILS 
(Monogram) 

PRODUCER: Grant Withers. DIRECTOR: 
Monta Bell. PLAYERS: Harry Grey, Paul 
Kelly, Ducky Louie, Jimmy Dodd, Ralph Lewis, 
Gloria Ann Chew, Fred Mah, Hayward Soo 
Hoo, Philip Ahn. 

WAR DRAMA. Prior to Pearl Harbor, an 
American pilot, one of the Flying Tigers, makes 
a forced landing in a Chinese village recently 
devastated by the Japs. He befriends a small 
Chinese boy, and sends him to school. The boy 
forms bands of young patriots who harass the 



Japs, and after war has been declared by the U. 
the boy patriots rescue the flier, who has crashe 
behind the lines. 



EXPERIMENT PERILOUS 
(RKO Radio) 

PRODUCER: Robert Fellows. DIRECTOF 
Jacques Tourneur. PLAYERS: Hedy Lamar 
George Brent, Paul Lukas. 

PSYCHIATRIC MELODRAMA. Set at tl 
turn of the century, this story concerns a youni 
doctor who meets an elderly woman on a trai 
going East. He becomes interested in her fami! 
troubles and upon investigation learns that h( 
wealthy brother, masquerading as a philanthropis 
is really an insane murderer. The doctor has hii 
put away and then woos and wins the maniac 
wife. 

LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE 
(Republic) 

PRODUCER: Harry Grey. DIRECTOI 
Frank Mac Donald. PLAYERS: Roy Roger 
Dale Evans, Sons of the Pioneers, Georj 
"Gabby" Hayes. 

WESTERN. From her late father, Dale Evai 
inherits a Wild West show of which Gabby Hay 
is the manager. A rival show has bought out the 
best stars and the best playing dates, so that tl 
unit is in bad shape until Roy Rogers and the So: 
of the Pioneers join it. The cowboys prove th 
the rival outfit is made up of horse thieves ai 
rustlers, and the criminals are brought to justk 

PRODUCT DIGEST SECTION, JULY 15. 19 



Non-rtop sales drive on Wcr Bonds and Stamps . 



Recruiting drives for all the Services . 



Movies for Allied prisoners of war . • . *1 






Information films for the home front . 



On-the-spot coverage of the fighting . . . *2 



Entertainment films for all of our Armed Forces , 




. m, ,«« f B » ' B/ 
** ' "V B l , 

S3 




Millions collected for the War Funds . 



"Good Neighbor" films for the America* 



"Live" shows touring the greatest 
entertainment circuit of all time . . . 





Movie men and women at war... 

THE more we learn about the movies' part in the 
war, the more